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Draft Minutes May 25, 2010

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I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
3:31 pm

Scott Beaver, Dean Braa, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, David Doellinger, Bryan Dutton, Mark Girod, Scott Grimm, Bob Hautala, Solveig Holmquist, Elaina Jamieson, Robert Monge, Katherine Schmidt, Tad Shannon, Tracy Smiles, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite, Zenon Zygmont.

Ex-Officio: John Minahan, Kent Neely, Evan Sorce.

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 11 May 2010 (document A)
Doellinger changed "gray method" to "grading method." No other changes. Change to be made and minutes approved.

III PRESIDENT'S REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate (document B)

Announced President Schmidt's last meeting.

Executive Committee approved new course, "Introduction to Toxicology."

WOU Finance Information Committee scheduled for Wednesday, 06/02/10. Looking for a senator representative to attend. Requested volunteer.

Evaluation update. The Writing Center tutors are currently assembling evaluation packets and plan to have all packets ready for pickup (any time during the day) Thursday morning for division office managers.

E-mail came out regarding online evaluations for online courses.

Incomplete forms available via Academic Requirements Committee website. Mary Harden sent form via e-mail to all faculty members last week.

Met with the Finance Senate Committee Thursday (the Writing Intensive Committee). It was a summation of the year rather than looking forward. Issues and concerns raised by the Chair, Cornelia Paraskevas, included the following: There is no tangible benefit teaching writing intensive courses because they do not count favorably toward tenure promotion. The committee has no authority or profits for overseeing established W courses and recommending changes. There are no workshops offered for new and experienced faculty of W courses. This is all reasonable and maybe next year the new chair will look at those things.

New senators not here two weeks ago introduced: Jeanine Rockwell-Kincannon, Kevin Helpie, Tad Shannon.

New senator orientation in September. This provides overview of the senate and helps members navigate documents on the Portal (on-line). Offers best practice methods for communicating information to and from divisions.

One more person needed from newly constituted senate to join Committee on Committees for next year. Goals for next year: 1) Review revised charges brought by all committees--they will be brought to floor next year. 2) Facilitating a Rules Committee to establish common bylaws for the Senate Committee. 3) Examining representation relating to FTE. Jeanine Rockwell-Kincannon volunteered.

Academic Excellence Showcase. Bryan Dutton, Chair, Lisa Cater, Jean Dean, Lisa Maroney, Betty Orwick, Jack Templeton, and Rob Winningham.

John Minahan.
Spoke about economic forecast from the Office of Economic Analysis. They show WOU to be $511 M down this quarter. Governor shows $560 M. Governor ordering maintaining wage freezes. Next week there will be a meeting to discuss plans for the campus regarding hard economic times, and Minahan requests input from the faculty. Enrollment and housing strong. Budget is okay.

Evan Sorce, ASWOU.
Last week in office. Applications for next year located outside ASWOU office. Plans on one more bookstore committee.

Kent Neely.
Shared some plans for the future including possibility of new course offerings at new locations. Other universities are looking for new markets beyond existing borders, i.e., Internet. Looking for new classes to serve new needs and serve students who need additional education. WOU will address five-year followups for new offerings.

Institutions are now expected to include information about materials that students will be required to have in relation to courses in the class schedule. WOU will look into how to address that. It is primarily to make students aware of costs associated with classes.

IV OLD BUSINESS

Revise Add/Drop Form presented by Mary Harden.

Motioned by Scott Grim. Seconded by Dean Braa.

Motion to endorse the amendment to Add/Drop Form to add the words "do not" to the three override statements.

Motion passed.

V NEW BUSINESS

Change/Additions to Program Change Form, Robert Monge (presenting for Laurie Burton) documents C, D & E.

Showed overhead of form. Changes to facilitate faculty to be more specific and clarify program changes.

To be first item of Old Business on 07/13/10.

Curriculum Committee Redistribution, Scott Beaver (for Klay Kruczek) document F.

Showed overhead of form. Committee on Committees decided to change representation of Curriculum Committee so that it is strictly divisional, (in the spirit of the U.S. Senate), with one representative from each of the divisions in each of the colleges. The only change that really happened is that the Division of Teacher's Ed. From the College of Education proposal was to change the representation from 2 members to 1. The Division of Teachers' Ed. is on board. All questions will be referred to Mark.

Question raised regarding how the columns were added as there were discrepancies.

Corrected document will be submitted. It will be posted in time for committee meetings next week.

This will be second item of Old Business on 07/13/10.

Honors Committee Redistribution, Scott Beaver (for Klay Kruczek) document G.

Honors Committee reviewed its own composition and put forth this proposal. Committee on Committees reviewed it carefully and considered it for an hour before voting unanimously to send it forward.

Changes Proposed: College of Ed. representative is going from 1 to 2 to specify the Division of Teachers' Ed and adding a seat in either Health and Physical Education or Special Education. The at-large seats are changing to be divisional specific to Psychology and either Business or Computer Science. Proposal is to eliminate the seat of the freshman representative. Any questions will be referred to the head of the committee, Bob Hautala.

Bob Hautala stated intent was to ensure representation university-wide.

Third item of Old Business to be addressed 07/13/10.

VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
Elections.

Newly elected senator position: Jeanine Rockwell-Kincannon.

Election for Executive Officers (paper ballot):
Current nominations: Gavin Keulks for president; Bob Hautala for vice president; Tracy Smiles for secretary; Cheryl Davis for at-large member; Jason Waite for at-large member.

Jason Waite voiced concern raised by Humanties colleagues about transparency of the nominating process. Concerned that there was no division meeting to suggest nominations.

President Schmidt reminded that during the last two senate meetings she announced nominations so that senators could take information back to divisions. Nomination Committee urged people to send names.

Results: President, Gavin Keulks 16; Vice President Bob Hautala 16; Secretary Tracy Smiles 16; At-large 16 votes each Cheryl Davis and Jason Wait.

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT
Joel Alexander - Reported on OUS assessment. Request for individuals from each campus interested in assessment coming forward and joining a workshop for OUS protocol. Reported on proposed high school standards (math). University professors concerned about high school math.

Reported on U of O favoring bonds. Concerns regarding cost of educating students. Universities are more efficient in educating students at lower cost than community colleges. However, university professors have lower salaries, etc., and overall doing more for less cost.

Dean Braa asked whether universities could go to state legislature instead of Board of Education or have independent bonding authority.

Joel Alexander indicated those models have not been worked out.

John Minahan stated bonding would be preferable. Community colleges issue their own bonds, but he does not see getting bonding authority. COPs (bonds for infrastructure). Would have to depend on Marion/Polk Counties for taxation. State funding is probably the best.

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
None

IX ADJOURNMENT
Current officers released. New officers instated.

Moved Dean Braa, Seconded Scott Beaver
4:20 pm

Minutes 11 May 2010

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Draft Minutes 11 May 2010

CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
3:31 pm

Cheryl Beaver, Scott Beaver, Dean Braa, Sue Dauer, Maria Dantas-Whitney, Cheryl Davis, David Doellinger, Bryan Dutton, Michael Freeman, Mark Girod, Scott Grimm, Bob Hautala, Solveig Holmquist, Henry Hughes, Elaina Jamieson, Mike LeMaster, Robert Monge (for Camila Gabaldon), Katherine Schmidt, Tracy Smiles, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite, Zenon Zygmont

Ex-Officio: Kent Neely.

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 27 April 2010 (document A)
Approved without correction.

III PRESIDENT'S REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate (document B)

Scott Beaver gave a report. He met with Provost Neely Thursday afternoon. After hearing concerns of many faculty at meetings, it was requested that Provost Neely order paper SIRs for this term. Provost Neely said it that sounded reasonable, but he would check into logistics and timeline of it. Provost Neely, Wanda and Julie did that and found the paper SIRs could be ordered and processed in time so they would be here before the last week of classes. Provost Neely ordered the paper SIRs and they should be here within seven days and then the process begins to get those going. Campus-wide announcement will be sent out concerning cessation of paper. It is planned to move to the online SIR as soon as possible, at most by the end of the next bargaining cycle. Scott Beaver thanked Provost Neely for his efforts in this matter.

President Schmidt announced the Executive Officer Nomination Committee, including, Mark Girod, Scott Beaver, Elaina Jamison and Jeananne Rockwell-Kincannon.

President Schmidt reviewed executive officer positions and things most important in those positions not found in the bylaws. Showed document on overhead which can be found online. Item #6 for the president, representing faculty, usually a between 8-20 hours, depending on time of year. Item #7 (in bylaws) for vice president to serve as a visible parliamentarian. Requires 3-4 hours a week for one-year commitment. Secretary 6-8 hours per week and one year commitment. If committee for next year chooses to employ a minute-taker, the responsibility goes down to about 4-6 hours per week. This includes executive committee meetings and senate attendance. For at-large members (not found in bylaws) concerns mouse facilitator during meetings and requires about three hours per week and a one-year commitment. Past president has been advising on management matters. It is about two hours a week and he shows up for meetings. This is available online.

Elections to be held in two weeks. All new senators will be voting that day.

Will be electing Committee-on-Committee members today and need one more candidate in the newly constituted senate category. That element will be postponed until two weeks because several divisions have not voted and they do not have senators yet.

Introduced new senators: Tracy Smiles, Maria Dantas-Whitney, Cheryl Beaver, Mike LeMaster, and Michael Freeman

Provost Neely announced there was no report from provost council. It will meet on Thursday.

IV OLD BUSINESS

Proposal: Music Theatre Emphasis, Michael Phillips (doc C).
Dean Braa moved to accept; Elaina Jamieson seconded.
Motion passed to approve Musical Theatre Emphasis to become an option in the existing BA/BS in Theatre.

Memo: Native American Language Policy, Wanda Clifton-Faber (doc D).
Dean Braa moved to accept; Scott Beaver seconded.
Motion passed to endorse Native American Language as a second language policy.

V NEW BUSINESS

Revise Add/Drop Form. Mary Harden indicated need for a change in wording of the form because of problems with faculty forgetting to check off boxes in Reason Box. This would reduce amount of time students are going back and forth if boxes are not checked.

David Doellinger mentioned grading method so students cannot modify form.

This will be the first item of "old business" in two weeks.

Incomplete Grade Policy. Mary Harden indicated that since Summer 2008 there have been 1815 incomplete grades recorded and 930 not removed from books. The problem is excessive paperwork in files when an instructor forgets to fill out form and students do nothing to fix. The result is failing to complete the course. It is suggested that students missing essential coursework for legitimate reason and are doing average or better, should be given the average grade at the end of the term with provision that they have up to 12 months to improve their grade. Incentive will be for students to improve GPA and diminish excessive paperwork. This puts responsibility on students to complete this.

If students who miss essential coursework with below average grades would have 12 months to complete coursework, but if work is not completed, grade will be changed to an F. If student graduates with incomplete courses, it will be permanent.

Instructors and students responsible to form contract for completion of coursework. It is instructor's discretion if student has legitimate excuse to be given extension to complete work and possibility of improving grade. If instructor does not initiate a grade change, it does not change. Gives students incentive to hurry to get work completed.

Hilda Rosselli was concerned if this would be able to be implemented by fall and be included in all handbooks. Would policy be able to come into agreement within all departments and have consistency? Would this influence students to try to get out of major course work at the end of term?

Mary Harden reiterated the issue driving this issue is the number of incompletes in files. This is the only institution (school) that does not convert Incompletes to F's.

Scott Beaver wanted clarification of difference between not completing a course whether a student is doing well or not completing it because they are doing poorly.

Dean Scheck commented that records peppered with I's show a student has no follow-through. I's that stay permanently are "mercy F's" and a way for students to avoid F grades.

Mark Girod concerned about more students debating grades.

Provost Neely suggested that I's be awarded for extenuating circumstances to give the student time to make up course work.

Mary Harden will consider taking back to committee to discuss further. Maybe there should be more stringent conditions.

Committee-on-Committee ballots were distributed to senators for 2010/2011 election. Ballots collected and counted. 17 for Jason Waite/0 write-ins. 17 for Katherine Schmidt/0 write-ins. 17 for Bryan Dutton/0 write-ins. Someone volunteered Amanda Smith to be the senator for the newly constituted senate, but that result cannot be counted.

President Schmidt wanted to remind all that they are planning to make committee more functional, proactive and recognizable in two years.

VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
None

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT
None

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
None

IX ADJOURNMENT
Moved Dean Braa, Seconded Jason Waite.
4:19 pm

Minutes 27 April 2010

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I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
3:32 pm
Joel Alexander, Scott Beaver, Dean Braa, Susan Daniel, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, David Doellinger, Bryan Dutton, Camila Gabaldon, Mark Girod, Scott Grim, Bob Hautala, Solveig Holmquist, Elaina Jamison, Pete Poston, Katherine Schmidt, Jason Waite, John Leadly
Ex-Officio: John Minahan, Evan Sorce

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 13 APRIL 2010 (document A)
Approved without correction.

III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate

The executive committee approved new courses from Music Ensemble and Linguistics as well as minor changes to courses from Rehabilitation Counseling, Education, and French.

Robert Monge will replace Camila Gabaldon as Secretary for the May meetings and we will have a hired note taker for those meetings.

The Pastega Awards have been announced. Congratulations to Mark Girod and Karie Mize. The recognition ceremony is May 5 and all are encouraged to attend.

The deadline for revised committee charges was last week and those will be forwarded to the Committee on Committees who will then give recommendations to the Senate.

The executive Committee met last week with the Committee on Committees and will be meeting next week with the Writing Intensive Committee.

Scott Beaver gave a report on the joint committee on evaluation. They met with Provost Neely last week to address the fact that the SIR is a contractually agreed on instrument and invited the provost or a representative of his choice to work in parallel with the committee on establishing a replacement instrument for the next contract.

This year, we will still need to go with SIR; the question is whether the version will be paper or electronic. With the electronic version, there is concern is about lower than normal response rate when there already is a low response rate, particularly for those faculty applying for tenure and promotion.

Wanda Clifton- Faber clarified that we will be administering the online version during dead and finals week. Labs will be made available so that faculty can take their classes over to do the evaluations.

President Schmidt reminded the senate that we still need 2 at large members for the executive nominating committee.
Elaina Jamieson volunteered.
President Schmidt reminded the senate that we will need an additional person in 2 weeks.

We also need 2010 committee on committee members.
Jason Waite has volunteered as outgoing executive committee member.

The executive committee members are writing position descriptions, to clarify for future holders of these positions what their roles might be.

Mark Girod clarified that incoming senators need to attend the May senate meetings. President Schmidt verified this.


John Minahan, Western Oregon University
We closed registration period up 2.3% in enrollment, which puts us in excellent condition going in to the next biennium.

Our students were the only 2 Fulbright students out of OUS this year.

There will be interviews for Foundation positions soon and he wants to clarify that they are not multiplying positions. When Paul Moredock (the former Vice President for Advancement) left, they did not replace him. Instead Danielle Nelson was named as Director of Advancement and Ghie Carlson was named as Director of the Foundation. Danielle Nelson will be interviewing assistants to deal with the annual fund and the alumni association. They are hiring more people for approximately what they previously spent.
The Auction will be coming up soon and Peter Courtney will chair the committee.
President Minahan thanked the faculty for their efforts around here.
Three individuals were given awards at the national level for advising.

Dean Braa inquired about the status of the three largest universities as public corportations. President Minahan responded that it is still on the table, but not at all a done deal.
Evan Sorce added that the Oregon Student Association is also opposed to it and has been active in its opposition.

Bob Hautala asked for clarification about an Oregonian article President Minahan had mentioned during his report. President Minahan described a recent cover page story which detailed how WOU leads in minority retention.

Those kinds of things, in combination with 2 Fulbright scholars, moves us beyond a regional.

Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate
Not present.

Evan Sorce, ASWOU
First, has a donation box for the Mark Youngsma memorial plaque and tree. They will also be selling Papa Murphy's discount cards next week.
He has been working on voter registration. ASWOU's goal was 200 and have registered around 100.
Working on textbook committee and are looking at how the relationship between publishers and professors works.
There will be a forum next Tuesday on Oregon Cannabis Tax act. Several professors will be presenting and they are hoping to also include law enforcement officers.
ASWOU elections are next week.

Kent Neely, Provosts' Council
Not present.

IV OLD BUSINESS
Proposal: Geropsychology Minor, Rob Winningham (document B)
A proposal from the psychology division for 27 hour minor with 1 required course, 12 hours of additional psychology.
There will be 11 hours of interdisciplinary course work that they can choose from.
Mark Girod moved to approve, Dean Braa seconded.
Passed unanimously.

Proposal: Catalog Expiration Policy, Nancy France (document C)
Dave McDonald presented for Nancy France.
Before presenting, he gave additional information about the advising awards won by Marita Cardinal and Karen Sullivan-Vance.

The proposal would expand the current 5 year catalog window to 7 years, which is more in line with other institutions.
Dean Braa moved to approve, Elaina Jamieson seconded.
The motion passed unanimously.

V NEW BUSINESS
Proposal: Music Theatre Emphasis, Michael Phillips (document D)
This creates a new emphasis within the existing BA/BS degree. It keeps the current core and allows students the option of choosing hat their 24 credits of electives be the Musical Theatre Studio sequence.
Bob Hautala inquired about why they would eliminate electives. Michael Phillips responded that it is already kind of happening as students take classes in the areas they are interested. This lets them choose a set path.

Scott Grimm added that putting this in the catalog is a draw for students. Since they began talking about it, ½ of their auditions have been for Musical Theatre.
It gives the students something that they can put on their resume.

Memo: Charter Additions Proposal, Camila Gabaldon-Winningham (document E)
This proposal was withdrawn.

Memo: Native American Language Policy, Wanda Clifton-Faber (document F)
The Provost is hoping for affirmation from the Senate on this proposed language for accepting tribal languages to fulfill second language requirements.
Dean Braa asked if it will help recruit more students.
Wanda Clifton-Faber responded that they hope so.

Bob Hautala commented that the wording reads as though Native Americans are foreign.
Dave McDonald explained that part of the challenge is semantics between three potential ways of describing a language requirement. All of the terminology options are offensive to someone. This language was crafted with tribal representatives and codifies what we have been doing in practice, it doesn't change it.


VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
none

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT
none

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
none

IX ADJOURNMENT
Moved David Doellinger, Seconded Elaina Jamieson.
4:09

Draft Minutes 27 April 2010

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I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
3:32 pm
Joel Alexander, Scoot Beaver, Dean Braa, Susan Daniel, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Dais, David Doellinger, Bryan Dutton, Camila Gabaldon, Mark Girod, Scott Grim, Bob Hautala, Solveig Holmquist, Elaina Jamison, Pete Poston, Katherine Schmidt, Jason Waite, John Leadly
Ex-Officio: John Minahan, Evan Sorce

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 13 APRIL 2010 (document A)
Approved without correction.

III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate

The executive committee approved new courses from Music Ensemble and Linguistics as well as minor changes to courses from Rehabilitation Counseling, Education, and French.

Robert Monge will replace Camila Gabaldon as Secretary for the May meetings and we will have a hired note taker for those meetings.

The Pastega Awards have been announced. Congratulations to Mark Girod and Karie Mize. The recognition ceremony is May 5 and all are encouraged to attend.

The deadline for revised committee charges was last week and those will be forwarded to the Committee on Committees who will then give recommendations to the Senate.

The executive Committee met last week with the Committee on Committees and will be meeting next week with the Writing Intensive Committee.

Soctt Beaver gave a report on the joint committee on evaluation. They met with Provost Neely last week to address the fact that the SIR is a contractually agreed on instrument and invited the provost or a representative of his choice to work in parallel with the committee on establishing a replacement instrument for the next contract.

This year, we will still need to go with SIR; the question is whether the version will be paper or electronic. With the electronic version, there is concern is about lower than normal response rate when there already is a low response rate, particularly for those faculty applying for tenure and promotion.

Wanda Clifton- Faber clarified that we will be administering the online version during dead and finals week. Labs will be made available so that faculty can take their classes over to do the evaluations.

President Schmidt reminded the senate that we still need 2 at large members for the executive nominating committee.
Elaina Jamieson volunteered.
President Schmidt reminded the senate that we will need an additional person in 2 weeks.

We also need 2010 committee on committee members.
Jason Waite has volunteered as outgoing executive committee member.

The executive committee members are writing position descriptions, to clarify for future holders of these positions what their roles might be.

Mark Girod clarified that incoming senators need to attend the May senate meetings. Presidnet Schmidt verified this.


John Minahan, Western Oregon University
We closed registration period up 2.3% in enrollment, which puts us in excellent condition going in to the next biennium.

Our students were the only 2 Fulbright students out of OUS this year.

There will be interviews for Foundation positions soon and he wants to clarify that they are not multiplying positions. When Paul Moredock (the former Vice President for Advancement) left, they did not replace him. Instead Danielle Nelson was named as Director of Advancement and Ghie Carlson was named as Director of the Foundation. Danielle Nelson will be interviewing assistants to deal with the annual fund and the alumni association. They are hiring more people for approximately what they previously spent.
The Auction will be coming up soon and Peter Courtney will chair the committee.
President Minahan thanked the faculty for their efforts around here.
Three individuals were given awards at the national level for advising.

Dean Braa inquired about the status of the three largest universities as public corportations. President Minahan responded that it is still on the table, but not at all a done deal.
Evan Sorce added that the Oregon Student Association is also opposed to it and has been active in its opposition.

Bob Hautala asked for clarification about an Oregonian article President Minahan had mentioned during his report. President Minahan described a recent cover page story which detailed how WOU leads in minority retention.

Those kinds of things, in combination with 2 Fulbright scholars, moves us beyond a regional.

Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate
Not present.

Evan Sorce, ASWOU
First, has a donation box for the Mark Youngsma memorial plaque and tree. They will also be selling Papa Murphy's discount cards next week.
He has been working on voter registration. ASWOU's goal was 200 and have registered around 100.
Working on textbook committee and are looking at how the relationship between publishers and professors works.
There will be a forum next Tuesday on Oregon Cannabis Tax act. Several professors will be presenting and they are hoping to also include law enforcement officers.
ASWOU elections are next week.

Kent Neely, Provosts' Council
Not present.

IV OLD BUSINESS
Proposal: Geropsychology Minor, Rob Winningham (document B)
A proposal from the psychology division for 27 hour minor with 1 required course, 12 hours of additional psychology.
There will be 11 hours of interdisciplinary course work that they can choose from.
Mark Girod moved to approve, Dean Braa seconded.
Passed unanimously.

Proposal: Catalog Expiration Policy, Nancy France (document C)
Dave McDonald presented for Nancy France.
Before presenting, he gave additional information about the advising awards won by Marita Cardinal and Karen Sullivan-Vance.

The proposal would expand the current 5 year catalog window to 7 years, which is more in line with other institutions.
Dean Braa moved to approve, Elaina Jamieson seconded.
The motion passed unanimously.

V NEW BUSINESS
Proposal: Music Theatre Emphasis, Michael Phillips (document D)
This creates a new emphasis within the existing BA/BS degree. It keeps the current core and allows students the option of choosing hat their 24 credits of electives be the Musical Theatre Studio sequence.
Bob Hautala inquired about why they would eliminate electives. Michael Phillips responded that it is already kind of happening as students take classes in the areas they are interested. This lets them choose a set path.

Scott Grimm added that putting this in the catalog is a draw for students. Since they began talking about it, ½ of their auditions have been for Musical Theatre.
It gives the students something that they can put on their resume.

Memo: Charter Additions Proposal, Camila Gabaldon-Winningham (document E)
This proposal was withdrawn.

Memo: Native American Language Policy, Wanda Clifton-Faber (document F)
The Provost is hoping for affirmation from the Senate on this proposed language for accepting tribal languages to fulfill second language requirements.
Dean Braa asked if it will help recruit more students.
Wanda Clifton-Faber responded that they hope so.

Bob Hautala commented that the wording reads as though Native Americans are foreign.
Dave McDonald explained that part of the challenge is semantics between three potential ways of describing a language requirement. All of the terminology options are offensive to someone. This language was crafted with tribal representatives and codifies what we have been doing in practice, it doesn't change it.


VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
none

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT
none

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
none

IX ADJOURNMENT
Moved David Doellinger, Seconded Elaina Jamieson.
4:09

Draft Minutes 13 April 2010

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Western Oregon University
Faculty Senate Agenda
13 April 2010, 3:30-5:00 p.m.
Columbia Room


Online Documents for Senatorial Review (www.wou.edu/president/facultysenate):
A: Draft of Minutes: 9 March 2010
B: Proposal: Policy Change for M.A. Program in History
C: Proposal: Academic Re-Start Program
D: Proposal: Geropsychology Minor
E: Proposal: Catalog Expiration Policy Change
F: Memo: LACC Committee Update
G: Memo: New Residence Hall

I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
3:32 pm
In attendance:
Joel Alexander, Scott Beaver, Dean Braa, Sue Dauer, Elisa Maroney (for Cheryl Davis), David Doellinger, Bryan Dutton, Kim Jensen (For Maureen Dolan), Camila Gabaldon, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Sandy Hedgepeth, Henry Hughes, Elaina Jamieson, Pete Poston, Katherine Schmidt, Gay Timken, Dana Uveland, Jason Waite, Zenon Zygmont
Ex-Officio: John Minahan, Kent Neely, Evan Sorce
II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 9 MARCH 2010 (document A)
None.
III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate
The executive committee approved course changes for INT, ART, and ED.
Robert Monge will be taking over as the Secretary and Senator from the library in May.
The Pastega Awards will be announced Wednesday, April 14.
All Committee charges are due on April 22.
The Executive committee met with the LACC committee and will next meet with the Committee on Committees.
We need another member for the Executive Committee Nominating Committee.
We also need member for the committee on committees.

John Minahan, Western Oregon University
Enrollment is up 8.5% (approximately 325 FTE). We are in the odd position of having funding for this year and next, but having numbers on the downside within 2 years.
He recently has been thinking about the reality our students live in. Determining truth is harder than ever these days and he hopes that faculty do well in teaching our students how to distinguish it. The distinction between true and false is often blurred in today's world and he realizes how hard it may be to have rational discourse in a world where students hear this all of the time.

Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate
Not present.

Evan Sorce, ASWOU
They are starting voter registration drive and would like faculty assistance with that. Some faculty have been contacted about giving 5 minutes of class time and will be getting a follow up.

This week is 1st amendment week. There are lots of good forums and the 1st amendment wall. An example of a recent forum is whether we have gone too far with 1st amendment rights.

At the OSA meeting the key issues discussed were Tuition and funding, the Oregon opportunity grant, and textbook spending. They are prioritizing textbooks at a local level. Currently there is a working group, but it doesn't have faculty representation, which is key. If anyone is interested in talking to them and can address selection issues please let him know.

Two other issues addressed were cultural competency training for staff and gender neutral areas at universities.

A student, Mark Youngsma, passed away a few weeks ago and they are working on raising money to plant a tree and place a plaque near Campbell Hall. President Schmidt encouraged Evan to bring a donation can and faculty to bring money to donate in 2 weeks.


Kent Neely, Provosts' Council

The Provosts' Council met Thursday, 8 April at Portland State University.

Curricular proposals were presented by
Eastern Oregon University
- BA/BS in Public Administration
- Undergraduate Certificate in Public Service

Southern Oregon University (these were returned to the University)
- New location - MBA in Guanajuato, Mexico
- New Location - MBA in Hanoi, Vietnam
- New Location - MIM in Hanoi, Vietnam

Five Year Follow Up Review Programs- a number of programs have not come up for review. And it has been discovered that we do not have a good rubric for reviewing.
- EOU - Music "Business Administration"
- OHSU - Biomedical Engineering
- OIT - Respiratory Care; Manufacturing Engineering Technology; Renewable Energy Engineering"
- OSU - Construction Engineering Management; Engineering
- SOU - Music (Conducting)
- UO - Marine Biology; Medieval Studies

Learning Outcomes Assessment Task Group will be bringing forward a list of recommendations following the previous year's work.

A faculty survey is being conducted regarding the conversion from quarters to semesters. You have received an email notification from Carol Harding that links to the survey. He encourages faculty to make their voices heard.

Pet Poston inquired about where the savings from this kind of conversion would go. Provost Neely responded that there is a large cost associated with converting, so it would be a while until savings were realized.
Mark Girod asked whay the change was happening. Provost Neely responded that we are one of the few states still on quarters. It is really an issue of pedagogy, transferability, etc.
Solveig Holmquist added that textbooks are designed for semesters, so they could be better utilized in a semester system.
Provost Neely noted that intercollegiate athletics also are impacted.
Solvieg added that many types of intercollegiate activities are impacted. For example, her choir must compete after only 2 weeks in the term against choirs who have been practicing together for much longer.

Evan Sorce added on the topic of textbooks, that students would have to buy fewer. He also added to his earlier request for faculty on the textbooks committee that he particularly hopes that the Math department would give representation to textbooks committee, since the new system they are using has reduced the ability to sell back/buy used textbooks.


IV OLD BUSINESS
Proposal: Policy Change for M.A. Program in History, Ben Lowe (document B)
Proposal to allow the history department to administer their own written comprehensive exams. They already administer their own oral comprehensive exams.
Joel Alexander moved to approve, Dean Braa Seconded.

Pete Poston inquired about the origin of this as a graduation requirement and how chemistry could set something similar up. Provost Neely responded that they would need to make a proposal to the Academic Requirements Committee.
Bob Hautala clarified with Ben Lowe that they were not changing the format or content of exam.

Passes unanimously


Proposal: Academic Re-Start Program, Associate Provost McDonald (document C)
Policy for students with a 5 year or longer separation from the university have the opportunity to have a "restart".
They can choose 1-3 terms to have not included in their GPA. These terms would still be on their transcript, but not in their GPA. The requirements are that they must have a2.5 GPA, be enrolled full time, have a major, and have support of advisor and chair. Adding this policy catches us up with other schools that have similar policies.
Pete Poston moved to approve, Jason Waite seconded.
Bob Hautala asked for clarification about what it would mean if they met the elegibility.
Associate Provost McDonald responded that those grades would no longer count against their GPA. They would still be on their transcripts and they would have to re-take any classes they needed for their major or the LACC.
Evan Sorce asked how many students would utilize this.
Associate Provost McDonald responded that he guessed it would be a small number.

Passes unanimously

V NEW BUSINESS
Proposal: Geropsychology Minor, Rob Winningham (document D)
Psychology is proposing a 27 hour geropsychology minor comprised of 1 required class and 12 other classes chosen from a list. They are hoping that internship would be a part of it. It is an interdisciplinary degree, with lots of options depending on what fields students want to go into.

Dean Braa asked what kind of jobs students might expect to go into with this degree.
Rob Winningham responded with a long list of areas, including long-term care administration, senior center administration, occupational therapy, home health care, social work, hospice, palliative care, and many others.


Proposal: Catalog Expiration Policy, Nancy France (document E)
She is proposing that the catalog expire after 7 years, rather than 5. Most students are taking more than 5 years to finish their degrees. This change will mostly impact students who are part time or take a break. Full time students already tend to choose catalogs from their junior or Senior year. Other OUS have at least 7 years (one has 8).

VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
Memo: LACC Committee Update, Tom Bergeron (document F)
Mostly an update. Have a proposed set of guidelines for LACC courses if curriculum committee is approving them.
They conducted a survey related to learning outcomes and in analyzing results the learning outcomes appear to be being addressed in LACCs.
They have taken a closer look at writing component, have analyzed and taken a look at solicited papers.
There are a few more meetings set for this year and they will have recommendations at the end of the year.

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT
None

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
New Residence Hall, Part II: Living and Learning, Tina Fuchs (document G)
Tina FUchs gave an overview of the programatic aspects of the new Live and Learn Residence Hall.
In the new residence hall, students will be part of a community, where they live in same area and have staff, curricular and co-curricular activities dedicated to that program.

There are many benefits to this type of program. Students in live learn communities tend to have higher scores for peer academic discussions, faculty mentoring relationships, transition to college, civic engagement, academic self-confidence, are more likely to participate in internship/practicum, faculty research, etc.

The residence hall will have 10 communities, with the following themes:
1. The arts
2. Future educators
3. Global village
4. Outdoor adventured
5. Pre-nursing (Mike LeMaster will be working with this group)
6. Green House (5 communities)

Preferably, there would be a faculty mentor for each community.

Each community will have 30-33 people, will be a mix of upperclasmen and freshmen and will be co-ed, which is a change for us.

At the end of February 53 students were signed up for this residence hall. They are adding more now, but are holding places for new students.

Faculty/staff member expectations:
Help with guidance
Mentor/collaborate with RA for programming and support
Balance between academic and non academic activities
Passion for theme
Present, available

Faculty benefits - captive audience, first priority access to classrooms/meeting rooms, opportunity to interact with students outside of the classroom, create new experiences for students, possibly a financial incentive (meal card?).

IX ADJOURNMENT
Jason Waite moved to adjourn, Dean Bra seconded.
Meeting adjourned at 4:46 pm.

Draft Minutes 9 March 2010

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I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
3:31pm
In attendance:
Scott Beaver, Dean Braa, Sue Dauer, Elisa Maroney, David Doellinger, Bryan Dutton, Camila Gabaldon, Mark Girod, Thaddeus Shannon (for Scott Grim), Peggy Pedersen (for Bob Hautala), Sandy Hedgepeth, Kevin Helppie, Kim Jensen (for Maureen Dolan), Henry Hughes, Elaina Jamieson, Katherine Schmidt, Hank Bersani (for Carl Schroeder), Gay Timken, Dana Uveland, Zenon Zygmont
Ex-officio:
John Minahan, Kent Neely, Evan Sorce

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 23 FEBRUARY 2010 (document A)
Approved without corrections.

III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate
Exec approved the following: LIB 609 prerequisite change, CSE 699 changed 1 to 3 credits (this was an error in the original paperwork)
The Pastega Award Deadline is 3/12/2010.

Report from Scott Beaver:
The online evaluation team met for the 2nd time yesterday. They have determined that they don't have the expertise to independently generate questions and are going to try to look at ETS and psychometric data from U of O for ideas. They will invite Provost Neely to the next meeting.

The executive committee also met the international students and services committee.
This year they have been focusing on study abroad:
They have been reviewing "at sea" programs.
Financial aid can now be used for non-WOU programs if students want to study abroad.
They are also working on publicity, including posting opportunities to take courses for LACC credit while abroad.
They have been working on a draft of their charge and will be changing the affiliated directors to ex-officio instead of ad-hoc members.

President Schmidt gave a brief Robert's rules review and reminded the senate that Robert's Rules were created to protect the rights of both the members and the group.


John Minahan, Western Oregon University

He went before reset committee, which is the committee on higher education restructuring.
There also was a board meeting, where the discussion was about finance. They are looking at next biennium.
The first page of his handout is the strategy to move finances. We have been working to move toward offsetting in-state with out of state and international tuition. Through this, 16% of our student population generates 28% of our revenue.
The second page was presented by Mark Weiss.
He has been trying to model it. The first major assumption he is working with is that federal funds will go away. DAS anticipates next biennium to be $2.4 billion below EBL (current service level).
In March, the administration expects to be asked for a plan for 25% reduction. This year were asked for 30%, ended up with 11%.
A 15% reduction is probably realistic.
The major assumption in the model is PERS increases. The 3rd is annual salary increases (5% = placeholder for model - not an offer).

He anticipates ending this year with about a 16% fund balance. Next year, that fund balance will used (11.4 million), which means we are looking at 19-20million dollar deficit in the longer run.

President Minahan added that we are going to keep trying to increase number of freshmen, particularly from out of state and international origins. He is concerned, though that this is just doing what we are already doing. We need to find new ways to generate revenue.
We need to increase numbers in our graduate programs and look for new programs that will generate numbers. Beyond that, he's not sure, because we do not control some of these other variables.
State funding is 30-35% of current budget; he anticipates that will drop, possibly by 10%. The PERS piece is growing of the problems that need to be fixed.

Mark did this model and made it dynamic - many schools are requesting it. If everyone goes down, we will be on the last end that goes down, but will still go down

Good news - he had long lunch with one of our benefactors and earned a scholarship.

Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate
Not present.

Evan Sorce, ASWOU
There was an OSA meeting on Saturday, where they talked about the funding issue. They also discussed the Frohnmeyer report and wrote out 6 points that expressed their position(opposed).
There was a peace march on campus yesterday (42 people turned out). It was a neat experience.
ASWOU working committees are getting responses back.
Recently, he has heard of issues with dead week coming up. ASWOU is hoping to see what the "rules" are and educate students and faculty on those.

Derek, a political science student, has been working with Evan on sustainability on campus. Their focal point is HSS. In the last few weeks, have noticed that pretty much everything being thrown away is recyclable. They want to remove classroom trash cans and put big cans in the hallway. In the hallway, they can have trash with recycling receptacles. They are working on an ASWOU grant, also have gotten over $100 through individual donations. They think it will decrease time spent by janitors and the consumption of plastic liners.

Questions:
Zenon Zygmont inquired if they had spoken with janitorial staff?
Not yet. They have spoken with Dean Scheck and wanted to get opinions from other groups (including faculty) first.

A goal is to give students the incentive to recycle. Part of it is what drives change. From surveys and a petition they have seen interest.

They are hoping to implement this for spring term.

Evan Sorce continued his report:
OSA is still working on textbook affordability. They tried to change it at legislative level. Since that did not work, they are looking at doing it at the local level. One possibility is creating a state-wide book exchange.
Also many math text books are available online. OSA is Looking into that option
Many students have to choose between food and books, which limits their ability to be successful

Kent Neely, Provosts' Council

The Provosts' Council met Thursday, 4 March at Portland State University.
Overview: Movement across Oregon is toward professional Science Masters degrees.

Curricular proposals were presented by
Oregon State University for:
- Master of Natural Resources
- Graduate Certificate in Management for Science Professional
- The Master's proposal was recommended for approval and will go before the Academic Strategies Committee for action.
- This could serve as a foundation for other institutions to offer professional science masters degrees.
- It is an online certificate.
- The Graduate Certificate was accepted.
Portland State University
- Graduate Certificate in Strategic Management of Technology
- Graduate Certificate in Technological Entrepreneurship -
This also demonstrates the change that is going on
- Graduate Certificate in Technology Management
- The Council accepted the Certificate in Technological Entrepreneurship.
- The other two proposals were returned to the institution for clarification as the two degrees had a number of similarities.
University of Oregon
- Doctor of Philosophy in Architecture
- The proposal was recommended for approval and will go before the Academic Strategies Committee for action.
Eastern Oregon University
- Graduate Certificate in the Teaching of Writing
- The Graduate Certificate was accepted
- Delivery of the EOU MBA Program to the EOU/Mt Hood Community College in Gresham, OR
- The proposal was accepted.
Southern Oregon University
- External Review report for a new program, Master of Science in Applied Computer Science.
- The review was accepted and the program proposal was recommended for approval and will go forward to the Academic Strategies Committee for action.

The Provosts' Council membership and/or their representatives attended a workshop the previous day that addressed the new standards of the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. All found it quite beneficial in clarifying procedures. WOU was represented by Kent Neely, Mark Weiss, Hilda Rosselli, Steve Scheck and Wanda Clifton-Faber. They were encouraged that they have taken appropriate first steps to address these.

Bruce Schafer from the Chancellor's Office gave a progress report from the Applied Baccalaureate Planning Initiative. Considerable discussion followed regarding the roles that universities and community colleges would play. Some community colleges think that they should be able to offer a baccalaureate degree in conjunction with applied baccalaureates. An advisory memo expressing the opinion that baccalaureate degrees should be offered by Universities was crafted by Sabah Randhawa and Kent Neely for the initiative committee.

Larry Galizio of the Chancellor's Office and Roy Koch, Provost, Portland State University provided a progress report on the feasibility study for conversion to semesters. Initial conversations revealed a number of logistical challenges (e.g., articulation agreements, registrar practices, advising guidelines and so forth) that would have considerable costs. No precise estimation of costs has been reached. No determination was made of the potential impact on learning or pedagogical practices. Cost estimates for other conversions have been in the millions of dollars.

The Academic Strategies Committee met Friday, 5 March 2010. Reports were received regarding different subcommittees including the Latino Student Success Resource Team, the Central Oregon Student Success initiative and the Graduate Education initiative. A progress report was given from the Provosts' Council regarding their work to align individual institutional missions with that of the Oregon University System. A full report will be presented to the Committee at its April meeting.

FYI: The OUS Chancellor's Office has developed a new Fact Book publication. It is available electronically at www.ous.edu/dept/ir/reportsfb2009/FactBook2009.pdf.

This Friday, campus will be hosting Cesar Chavez Conference. It will bring 1500 students from 40 different high schools. This year, the conference is closed to the general campus because of the demand for the keynote speaker - Edward James Olmos.

Scott- University of Cincinnati cost was high. Have they realized any savings?
Change has not been in place long enough to see savings.
Other institutions have made the change and have not reported sig savings. Main result is pedagogical.

IV OLD BUSINESS
Teacher Education Proposals
These proposals are a result of enrollment management, which suggests there is a retention crisis. Additionally, national policy on teacher education is calling for reform and a survey of our graduates support the need for change.
After campus wide tension, a systematic program of partnership and collaboration emerged resulting in these proposals.


Program Proposal: Early Childhood Only Education, Mark Girod (document B, C, & D)
Dana Uveland moves to approve this proposal, Henry Hughes seconds.
Motion passes unanimously

Program Proposal: Early Childhood/Elementary Education, Mark Girod (document B, C, & E)
Dana Uveland moves to approve this proposal, Scott Beaver seconds.
Motion passes unanimously

Program Proposal: Elementary/Middle Education, Mark Girod (document B, C, & F)
ED would be glad to work with humanities on focus areas.

Scott Beaver moves to approve this proposal, Peggy Pedersen seconds.
Motion passes unanimously


Program Proposal: Honors Program, Sharon Oberst & Gavin Keulks & Jeff Myers (document G & H)
In addition to the sponsors, there was a student member of the honors program in attendance to represent program.
Sharon Oberst gave some background on the proposal:
Since spring 2008, members of honors committee have been working on retention rate. Right now there is a minimum 50% drop out rate. Through surveys and representatives, the students indicated that flexibility and electives in offerings would help.
Committee looked at ways to improve the program and determined that the best way to do that would be to reallocate 6 credits, three from Natural Sciences and three from philosophy. Bob Hautala solicited feedback on this proposal. The committee looked at that feedback and voted unanimously to support it.
Jeff Myers indicated that there are currently 15 credits from lab sciences. These consist of three lecture and two lab hours per class. Comparable classes in their division are valued at 4 credits. The division and committee decided that it would be easy to reduce the honors requirement by reducing the credit hours from 5 to 4, a move that would bring them in to alignment with other classes. This change will not change the number of contact hours, only the paper work.
Gavin Keulks described the changes in the number of philosophy credits. In the program, philosophy had been 9 hours and a reduction to 6 is part of this proposal. There has been a lot of discussion with humanities on this topic.
Philosophy is the only department or division in the honors program that has more credits than the standard LACC and the feeling is that 9 credits of philosophy are unnecessary to most major's career path. In 1996, the Senate did approve a change from 9 credits to 6 credits. That was later there was a changed back to 9 credits at the committee level. The change back to 9 credits never went to senate.

Their student survey (mentioned by Sharon) return rate was 70%. While students do not guide curriculum, their interest in taking classes drives whether they are offered or not. Additionally, the Honors program has received requests to put classes from some divisions (that formerly were part of the curriculum) back in. One way of doing this is by adding the honors elective category.

They have been working on this for 2 years and have a document logging communication about the proposal and process. Representatives met with the senate executive committee to determine the process this would need to go through. The executive committee, in turn, brought in representatives from various committees and consulted with the curriculum committee, who voted unanimously that this was the appropriate process.

Gay Timken moved the approve this proposal. Scott Beaver seconded.

Dean Braa inquired whether the philosophy professors had a chance to speak to their division and to the honors committee.

Susan Daniel responded that when the proposal came to the division meeting, the philosophy program asked to be placed on the agenda as well. The day of the meeting, there was a complaint that the philosophy department was not put on the agenda 2 days prior to the meeting. Eventually, [having them on the agenda] was voted on and approved and they were allotted 10 minutes. They were also invited to honors committee meeting on Thursday. Mark Perlman and Ryan Hickerson both attended. Susan asked Mark Perlman to address that, since she was unable to attend.
Mark Perlman commented that at the meeting the discussion was more about the process than the proposal because content was already decided.
President Schmidt inquired as to whether the question had been answered.
Dean Braa responded that he was not sure. Mark Perlman clarified that, yes, he had a chance to discuss it with the committee.
Gavin Keulks asked if he could respond to the comments made.
President Schmidt said no, the question had been answered.
Gay Timken remarked that it seems like there have been several division meetings where this was discussed and, while we do not always like the outcome of discussions, at some point a change happens.
Susan Daniel responded that she had reviewed humanities minutes and only found 1 meeting where the program had been discussed.

Motion passes 16 ayes, Dean Braa and Zenon Zygmont abstain. One senator needed to leave before the vote.

Proposal: Graduate Policy Change (document I, J, & K)
This proposal is to endorse degrees from countries that are a part of the bologna process. Not having had this in place has meant that we have had to reject some students because of the 4 year requirement.

Scott Beaver inquired if it was a correct assumption that these three year degrees are more applied.
Linda Stonecipher replied yes, that is the case. In the countries where these degrees are offered, the LACC-type classes are met at the high school level.

Dean Braa moved to approve. Bryan Dutton seconded.
Motion passes unanimously.


V NEW BUSINESS
Proposal : Policy Change for M.A. Program in History, Ben Lowe (document L)
The history department would like to administer their own comprehensive exams. Their exams are already different from the requirements of other programs. The main issue is that this would allow summer comprehensive exams. When the program was introduced, they specifically tried to address different demographics, including the working students, who could return each summer to complete the program. As it stands, (without summer comprehensive exams) the students would have to return during another term to take the exams.

Proposal: Academic Re-Start Program, Associate Provost McDonald (document M)
Small segment of students who left the university under academic duress. Often they will mature and return to the university.
Proposing:
That students, upon return (after meeting readmission criteria), after 2 terms in a row of full time enrollment, with a minimum 2.5 GPA, declared major, letter of recommendation from a faculty member, and endorsement of department chair could choose not to have some terms included in their GPA. Those terms would still be on their transcripts, just not used in calculating their WOU GPA. The students could not cherry pick terms or grades and keep good grades an entire term or consecutive terms would be ignored and they would have to re-take those classes.

Bryan Dutton inquired when the letter would be required. Dave McDonald responded that it would be in the third term after readmission.

Scott Beaver asked if there was a waiting period before the students would be eligible to do this. Dave McDonald responded that they would have to wait at least 5 years. Zenon Zygmont inquired if he had considered shortening that time. Dave responded that he is open to it, but 5 years is what is used by others.

Scott Beaver inquired about credits earned at another school in the interim. Dave responded that their re-admission would be based on other work; this would be based on WOU only. Gay Timken asked how the re-admission would be determined. Dave McDonald responded that it would be done in the same way it is now. The registrar looks at WOU and other work before re-admitting.

VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
None

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT
None

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
None

IX ADJOURNMENT
4:52

Draft Minutes 23 February 2010

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I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
3:30
In attendance:
Joel Alexander, Scott Beaver, Dean Braa, Susan Daniel, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, Camila Gabaldon, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Mark Perlman (for Henry Hughes), Elaina Jamieson, Pete Poston, Katherine Schmidt, Gay Timken, Jason Waite, Zenon Zygmont

Ex-Oficio:
John Minahan, Kent Neely, Evan Sorce

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 9 FEBRUARY 2010 (document A)
Approved

III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate (document B & C)
The executive committee approved 805 courses in ASL, Education, Interpreting, Math, Special Education Rehabilitation Counseling, and Teacher Preparation deaf education.
The Union executive board recommended postponing online course evaluations until spring to the Provost. He has agreed.
Arrangements can be made for evaluations to occur this term, if you prefer want to do it this term.

Updated and revised committee charges are due April 22, 2010.
The executive committee spent a significant amount of time discussing the Honors program curriculum change process. That committee should be commend for bringing this issue to the executive committee. After input from many committees, including the curriculum committee, graduate committee, academic requirements committee and committee on committees, it has been determined that the process for these proposals will be to go through the executive committee directly to senate. This will be included in their updated charge. Laurie Burton (curriculum committee chair) was present to answer any questions about the process from the curriculum perspective. There were none.

The executive committee will meet with the International Education Committee on 5 March.
We have a few positions that need to be filled:
Student Media board needs a new representative
We will also need a substitute secretary for at least the last two meetings of the year. We are hoping to hire a minute taker, so this position would primarily be serving as a member of the executive committee and editing the typed minutes.


John Minahan, Western Oregon University
Special legislative session likely to close without loss of fund balances.
We (WOU) will be looking at one-time funding opportunities for special projects.
University Advancement has been being re-organized. It really has two functions: growing endowment and annual giving/ alumni relations. Instead of having these under the same person, the duties have been split. Danielle Nelson is working on alumni relations and they have hired a part time person to grow board/endowment. The goal is to have 3-5 people on the ground fundraising.


Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate
Not present.

Evan Sorce, ASWOU

Apologized for having missed meetings. He is starting two committees: one on catering (separate rate for campus community) and one on the bookstore. They are hoping to revamp the bookstore, making it more profitable and upgrade the online systems.
For any faculty that wanted them, he had tickets for a Friday night concert, including Root down (Reggae) and the Caleb Ray Band (alternative rock).

Kent Neely, Provosts' Council
Nothing from Provosts council; they will be meeting next week.
He attended a special workshop with NWCCU on Wednesday. A key point of our interim report to NWCCU was how we are becoming data driven.

The OUS system is going to be audited for financial efficiencies. One model they are working with is a recent audit at the University of Maryland system.
Some recommendations are:
• An individual is supported for only 120 credit hours, which is the minimum required for a major. Thereafter they would pay a higher rate based on the lack of state subsidy.
• All students would have part of their education from another institution.
WOU will be one of the first institutions to be audited. This fits with the NWCCU changed standards. A shift in the standards is to measuring outputs. If a university declares a mission they must demonstrate in a quantitative fashion that it has fulfilled it.

Last week's workshop was region-wide workshop. It was primarily on how to deal with first standard.
Today, we will be given a progress report about what has been done. The new standard allows the institutions to identify what realms it will be measured by. We will be expected to identify core themes.
Generally four will be:
1. Liberal arts learning environment for our students.
2. Diversified campus community
3. Represent that we are a stable and sustainable institution
4. Student readiness (have we done the work to prepare students for a profession - either through a LA base or through specific training e.g., teacher education)

He has assembled a university advisory council who will meet monthly beginning on Friday. They will be doing the next level of planning and information gathering.

Michael Ellis from university computing gave a demonstration of a key performance indicators (KPI) dynamic dashboard, which is in the portal. His caveat was that the data currently included is fake and is only meant to serve as a model.

The dashboard aligns data based on day of term, not date. Indicators may have one of three different colors of arrow: red, yellow, green. If arrow is pointing up, this year's number is greater than last year's. Hovering over the question mark gives a definition of what is being measured. For some of the data, you can drill down and you may be able to include multiple years.
Eventually the data will be automatically updated with data from banner.
Provost Neely noted that it will be determined who will have access to the data, but that at least division heads will have it available.


IV OLD BUSINESS
None

V NEW BUSINESS
President Schmidt introduced this set of proposals, noting that they are broad and far-reaching. She asked Laurie Burton to speak to the process that they had been through in the curriculum committee.
Summary from Laurie Burton:
These proposals came to curriculum committee in December, January and February. In December, they were new business and there was concern about a perceived lack of collaboration. Voting occurred in January. There was a feeling was that collaboration had not occurred and that vote failed.
After that Teacher Education did a great job of communicating with divisions and creating compromises.
All of the proposals passed unanimously in February.

Mark Girod presented background information for all of the proposals and handed out a packet to the senate (Document E):
This is likely the most widely vetted set of proposals to come before senate in a long time.
Four points driving this and four guiding principles are on cover page.
There have been major changes in field of education - it is a different place and university based teacher education has to respond to that.
With this change, they are hoping to create a sense of professional practice among their majors. Having majors with only courses at the 400 level does not make sense.
The reality of what is detailed on page 12 is that there is huge pressure is on certain areas and we need to train students to complete in this environment.
This would chance the program from 4 terms to 3. The admissions process would still be there, but would be changed to a 2-tiered process, with first tier much earlier on.

The report contains policy papers stating need for this change. Among them are: enrollment management (major attrition),
increased competition in Oregon, data from the Oregon mentor project, and data from graduates.

I looking at a credit hour analysis, the current model is 75% LAS. The proposal would change that to 63%, which is still high compared to other institutions. SOU, for example, is 55% LAS and Michigan state (# 1 ranked) is 57% LAS.
Will still have more credit hours than most of these other institutions

He is pleased to have the unanimous support of curriculum committee.

Laurie Burton added that all of the information is available on the archives linked from curriculum pages.

Gay Timken commend the teacher education faculty. It is timely and, while we may not like everything about it, doing good teacher education is not easy and it is good to be examining how we can get it done
Bob Hautala asked when Education would begin advising pre-education students.
Mark Girod responded that they have already began transferring the advising pre-education students from the advising center.
Students have to meet certain indicators (4 of 5) then are transferred to an education advisor.

Pete Poston inquired about the decrease in credits in science.
Mark Girod explained that with the ability to double-dip with the LACCs, it is essentially a wash.

Dean Braa asked if implementing lower level courses and advising will help with the pipeline attrition.
Mark responded that, yes, that is the hope.

Program Proposal: Early Childhood Only Education, Mark Girod (document D, E, & F)
Early childhood only had 6 majors last year. Teacher education is trying to encourage these students to move toward the early childhood/elementary degree.


Program Proposal: Early Childhood/Elementary Education, Mark Girod (document D, E, & G)
This represents 80% of their students. To earn this degree, they currently have to complete 194-99 credits with no electives.
The proposal will change this to 187-190 credit hours, including some elective credits built in.
Most of the students (98%) earn BS degrees. This change allows a little room for language credits in hopes of promoting more bilingualism in our emerging teachers.

Details are on page 55. Course proposals and syllabi are not included in packet.

Program Proposal: Elementary/Middle Education, Mark Girod (document D, E, & H)

Program Proposal: Honors Program, Bob Hautala & Gavin Keulks (document I & J)
This proposal is redistributing credits. Six credits are being moved around to create an honors elective category.
The process began in 2008 and the proposal has been distributed widely.
They are trying to make curriculum a little more flexible for students and to allow programs that are not part of the established curriculum to offer courses within the program.
The six credits are a result of a reduction of 3 credits in philosophy and reflect a change in credit hours (5 to 4) in the sciences.

Mark Perlman
Objects to the fact that it is being dealt with today. Thinks it should have gone through the normal curriculum process.

Gavin Keulks responded that this has been through a process. The result of which determined that all senate committees are on the same level. All curricular experts have been in favor of treating them as a parallel committee to graduate committee.

Also, the curriculum committee voted unanimously that this was the correct process.

Mark Perlman argued that the idea that this was presented to the divisions, is false, saying that the idea was floated, but never revisited.

Bob Hautala reminded him of an email sent to all faculty containing the proposals.
Gavin Keulks also commented that after this meeting, divisions would have the opportunity to discuss the proposal.

Susan Daniel indicated that she feels that [the philosophy faculty] have not had the opportunity to present their viewpoint, despite requesting it. She feels as though this is parallel to the education proposals, where decisions were made without collaboration.

Gavin responded that Carol Harding put the honors program on the [humanities division meeting] agenda several times last fall and that the Humanities comments were delivered by a Philosophy faculty member.

Bob also pointed that move from 9 to 6 is a return to what the philosophy credit hours were in 1995.

Gavin added that faculty senate voted on the change to six credits and that, without faculty senate approval, it has moved back up.

He continued that philosophy is virtually absent from other honors programs in the state. It is a point of distinction in our program.

Susan said that she still doesn't feel as though she is being heard and would like it to be discussed in an open forum. Her opposition is not to this proposal, it is to the fact that it was not discussed.

President Schmidt reminded the senate that there are 2 weeks until this comes back as old business. She recommends that Carol Harding be contacted about discussing this between now and then.

She also informed the senate Robert's Rules will be followed for the discussion of this when this appears in old business and asked senators to prepare a statement if they plan to say something on the topic.

Gavin recommended reading supporting materials, which contains rationales for decisions. He does not feel that the identity of the honors program is changed with this. Honors programs are unique in that they are not a program with regular faculty.

At this point there was one more item of new business, which needed to be introduced. President Schmidt asked for a motion to extend the meeting.
Joel Alexander moved to extend the meeting. Scott Beaver seconded.

Motion passes unanimously.

Linda Stonecipher presented a memo requesting a change in the graduate program admission policy.
Currently our policy says to be admitted a student must have a 4-year baccalaureate.
Most European students complete a 3 year degree, which is agreed upon under the Bologna accord.
This means that right now students from Europe and African can't enroll in our programs.
The graduate committee voted to approve 3 year degrees from countries that align with the Bologna Accord and is asking the senate to do the same.
The institute for international education did a survey of graduate schools in 2008. Only 15% of respondents don't accept bologna degrees.
Bologna students are the 3rd most important source of students to the US and we are currently losing out on those.

VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
none

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT
none

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
none

IX ADJOURNMENT
5:04pm

Minutes 9 February 2010

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I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
3:31 pm
In attendance:
Rob Winningham (for Joel Alexander), Scott Beaver, Dean Braa, Cheryl Davis, Susan Daniel, David Doellinger, Bryan Dutton, Scott Grim, Bob Hautala, Sandy Hedgepeth, Kevin Helppie (for Solveig Holmquist), Henry Hughes, Elaina Jamieson, Pete Poston, Katherine Schmidt, Gay Timken, Jason Waite, Zenon Zygmont
Ex-Oficio:
Mark Weiss (for John Minahan), Kent Neely

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 26 January 2010 (document A)


III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate
The Teacher education senators are unable to attend today's meeting as they are in a meeting regarding their curriculum proposals.
The executive committee approved course change proposals from Computer Science, Criminal Justice, Linguistics, Religion, and Physical Education.
The Academic Infrastructure Committee now has a website; a revised charge is forthcoming.
The Office on Violence Against Women is applying for $300,000 grant. They need a senator to serve as a representative. Volunteers? Suggestions? Please let President Schmidt know.
The executive committee postponed our meeting with the international studies committee. Instead they met with several committees regarding the process for changing the Honors curriculum. In addition to that meeting, the curriculum committee will be making a recommendation on the process at their meeting on February 16.
Finally, the study abroad program would like to encourage faculty to allow study abroad representatives into their classrooms.

John Minahan, Western Oregon University
President Minahan is ill. Mark Weiss presented on his behalf.
He distributed 2 handouts.
The second quarter financial report was on docket for last board meeting. In it, they project a slight increase in fund balance, which is predominantly due to Chancellor's office additional allocation of state funds, which was received as a result of the tax measures passing. We are also benefiting from lower interest rates on new construction projects.
A perfect storm is indeed approaching.
Yesterday, projections for revenue forcasts for this biennium were decreased.
½ will come from reserves the other ½ will have to be found by the legislature.

OUS put together an issues brief position paper, which WOU helped craft.
Fund balances are at risk to fill the hole ($100 million) this biennium.
Brief includes arguments as to why this is a bad idea.

Additionally, as we look to next biennium, we have several significant impacts for WOU.


  • On spreadsheet, 1.8 million dollars is coming from the recovery act. That is expected not to be there in the next biennium.

  • We also have a projected shortfall from the essential budget level of 10% (about 1 million)

  • PERS also has a deficit and will be increasing rates in the next biennium by 6.5%. For this university that is 1.7 million.

  • We also have potential PEBB increases.

  • After a two year salary freeze this biennium, there is an expectation of an increase in the next biennium. If it were 5% in each of the two years, it would be 4.5 million for the biennium.

  • High School graduating classes are leveling off.


On the positive side, OUS employs 13,000 permanent, full-time employees and 17,000 part-time, including students. We also spend significantly with local vendors and our students are the employees of tomorrow. The system produces more income and jobs than any other part of the state government.


Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate
Not present

Evan Sorce, ASWOU
Not present

Kent Neely, Provosts' Council
At the last Faculty Senate, he reported about the "Tri Board" meeting at Portland State University in January. Since then a report has been made available on-line and he wishes to provide it for the record. Included in that report is a publication of the American Association of Colleges and Universities entitled "Raising the Bar: Employers' Views on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn." It can be found at:
http://www.aacu.org/leap/documents/2009_EmployerSurvey.pdf.

Other information relevant to the role of liberal education can be found at the AAC&U's website:
http://www.aacu.org/leap/public_opinion_research.cfm.

Research from the a fore mentioned report that was used as part of the meeting was done by Heart research .


IV OLD BUSINESS
Program Proposal: Military Science, (document B)
The proposal drops two history courses and adds a military science course. An additional political science course has also been added as an option. The writing requirement will remain any writing class higher than 135.
Scott Beaver moved to approve, Zenon Zygmont seconded.
David Doellinger commented that the history department has discussed this a lot and respects the ability of departments to make their own curricular decisions and understands that they are under pressure. In principle they are concerned about history classes being replaced by military history class with MIL prefix.
Dean Scheck addressed the change. A military requirement is that this course needs to be taught from the perspective of a military and by a military certified instructor. This is the most effective way for the minor to be able to affect that change. He respects the history perspective.
Susan Daniel asked for a description of the new course and courses being replaced. President Schmidt read the new course descriptions.
David Doellinger added that the content of the courses being replaced places war in a social/economic/political context.
Susan inquired as to whether any thought/ effort was made to have a team taught course?
David responded that the history department feels that this is their (military science's) minor and they can do what they want within their minor. As historians they feel history needs context. They would not be interested in the team teaching. The issue the history has with this change is really with the military for requiring this, not with this particular change.
Motion passes with one nay (David Doellinger) and one abstention (Dean Braa).


Curriculum Proposal: General Science, Phillip Wade (document C)
Adds a new science methods course GS 325. The proposal wasput together in conjunction with teacher education and its basis is a mandate that changed the Oregon Science standards and how these courses are taught. It will be a slight reduction in FTE and will integrate several sciences into one course, integrating more scientific inquiry.
Eventually they may take old science methods courses off the books, but for now, are just adding this one.
Dean Braa moved approval, Pete Poston seconded.
Motion passes unanimously.

Program Proposal: Social Science, David Doellinger (document D)
Revising social science major so that the required theory and methods course does not have to be from their area of concentration. The second part of the proposal adds five courses to theory and methods options, based on faculty expertise.
Dean Braa moved to approve, Henry Huges seconded.
Bob Hautala inquired as to whether students would be required to take some theory in their concentration are, the answer to which was no.
Dean Braa added that not all types of methods are available in all areas of social sciences (e.g, statistics), so a student interested in a particular method would need to take a methods course outside of their concentration area.
Motion passes unanimously.

Program Proposal: M.A. Interpreting, Elisa Maroney (document E & F)
This is a 47 credit interpreting masters, delivered in hybrid format. They have determined that there is a need for it and there currently is only one graduate program in interpreting in the US (at Gallaudet). This program would be beyond what that program does, as that program only trains entry level interpreters.
WOU has always been cutting edge in this area. We began training interpreters in 1976, just 2 years after these type of programs began anywhere. They did a national survey and had more than 470 response. Sixty six percent respondents were interested in a graduate program. Forty eight percent of those wanted both interpreting and teaching interpreting, thirty two percent wanted just interpreting.
Dean Braa moved to approve, Bryan Dutton seconded.
Dean Braa asked if they had resources to teach all of this. Elisa responded that they don't, but could make it work because the program is hybrid and they could recruit adjuncts from all over the US to teach online.
Motion passes unanimously.

Program Proposal: M.A. Teaching Interpreting, Elisa Maroney (document G, H, & I)
This is a 65 credit degree program in teaching interpreting (hybrid format). Currently there is only one gradute program (at Northwestern) started in 2005 and only 3 individuals have graduated from that program.
Sixty interpreter educators will retire in next 10 years and 140 will be needed. Patrt of this need is that starting in 2012, to sit for national certification will require a bachelor's instead of an AA.
Twenty percent of survey respondents were interested in Teaching Interpreting alone.
Henry Hughes moved to approve, Gay Timken seconded.
Motion passes unanimously.

Program Proposal: Fire Services Administration, LaRon Tolley (document J)
Proposal to eliminate a minor.
Reason is that currently 97-98% are at a distance and are taking all of the courses online or through a condensed format. They can complete major courses through WOU, but most go elsewhere to complete the minor, as we do not have any minors taught in these formats. Eliminating the minor would enable them to take more courses at WOU, keeping them here as well as their tuition dollars.
One of our main competitors is our partner, EOU. EOU has put all of their courses online and provide multiple options of courses students take there and transfer back here.
Given the economic climate, this program is "under a microscope" due to being under enrolled.
The main motivation for this change is to keep students here.
LaRon Tolley serves on National Fire Science Curriculum Committee and has seen the programs at other college. He is using the examples those programs have set to make this recommendation and truly believes that this is the best option for the program.

President Schmidt presented the following information from the curriculum committee minutes, to give the senate a sense of their deliberations.
4.4.4 Program Changes
The committee noted the following list of majors which don't require minors and discussed the interdisciplinary nature of these majors
- Math / CS double major
- All Teacher Ed majors
- All Bachelor of Music majors
- Interdisciplinary Studies
Both the chair and the Assistant Registrar expressed concern that dropping a minor from the FSA major did not reflect current practice and created a "slippery slope" precedent. The chair suggested that she would prefer to table the motion and bring it to her division for discussion.
The rest of the committee discussion focused in on the idea that because this is a specialized degree it would be appropriate to drop the minor.
Sandy Hedgepeth moved to approve the changes, Rob Winningham seconded.
LaRon Tolley confirmed that we are the only OUS institution currently requiring a minor and that the number of credits in the major would remain the same.
Bryan Dutton inquired as to whether there had been a consideration of offering the degree as something other than a BA/BS.
LaRon responded, yes. Some institutions offer a BA/BS (EOU). Others offer a Bachelors of Fire Service Administration. Yet others offer a Bachelors of Business Administration with a concentration in Fire Service.
Katherine Schmidt asked if thought had gone into being more explicit about what classes need to be taken. LaRon replied yes, it could be spelled out to make them more explicit, but it would exclude the possibility of them taking social science or psychology classes that might be available through distance format. Now the students go on the recommendation of their advisor (him).
Susan Daniel expressed the humanities concerns that the first concern should be for student's education, rather than losing money. And that they would like to see what the program would be without a minor. She mentioned that they were also concerned about the precedence of removing the minor.
Dean Braa addressed the precedent issue, reminding the senate that we already have programs without and most universities don't require minors, so we could be in trouble if we are requiring all majors to have minors.
Scott Grim described the BFA in theater, which was put together without minor. But, extra courses were built into the degree because they needed them. He would feel better if there was some built in explanation for those credits.

David Doellinger inquired where Fire Service Administration is housed on campus, noting that it used to be in social science.
Then FSA and Interdisciplinary studies moved directly under direction of Dean Scheck.
Dean Braa called the question. Henry Hughes seconded.

In favor:
Zenon Zygmont, Rob WInningham, Sandy Hedgepeth, Scott Grim, Cheryl Davis, Dean Braa, Camila Gabaldon

Opposing:
Bryan Dutton, Scott Beaver, Pete Poston, David Doellinger, Jason Waite, Gay Timken, Henry Hughes, Susan Daniel

Abstaining: Elaina Jamieson, Katherine Schmidt

Motion does not pass. 7 in favor, 8 opposing, 1 abstention.

Memo: Modification of Add/Drop Deadlines, Associate Provost McDonald (document K)
Memo is driven by desire to increase retention of students. This endorsement would move the last day to drop to the end of the 4th week and create a withdrawal policy.
Bob Hautala moves to endorse ,David Doellinger seconds.
Sandy Hedgepeth inquired as to the impact on financial aid.
Dave MacDonald replied that it actually may help students with financial aid, as we may shrink the need to repay aid.
Susan Daniel commented that students might not have a grade for a particular course by the time the drop date has passed and may not have the information that they need.
Dave MacDonald replied that yes, this will have to continue to be cooperative between faculty and students.
David Doellinger inquired about situations where a student's registration is held up.
These situations are very rare, but the registrar could waive any penalties
Zenon Zygmont mentioned a rumor that students would be able to add during first week without a signature.
Dave MacDonald responded that this is not true. This change only removes the financial penalty in the first week.
Motion passes unanimously.


Memo: DEP 805 Course Approval Process, Scott Beaver (document L)
This would allow the executive committee to approve changes to 80X courses, rather than bringing them to the full senate.
Bryan Dutton moved to approve, Dean Braa seconded.
Motion passes unanimously.

Memo: Inter-Institutional Faculty Senate Resolution, Ike Nail (document M)

IFS feels very strongly that the 5 points listed are important.
There seem to be some end runs around the normal process
What we are asking for is a reaffirmation of the process that has been in place for years.
Want to make sure that a reorganization without input does not occur.

Dean Braa moved to accept, Elaina Jameison seconded.
Dean Braa commented that this is a good thing.
Camila Gabaldon noted that, while the library faculty agree with the core principles of this document, they did not want to endorse a document as poorly written as this one.
Motion passes. with 2 nays (Camila Gabaldon and Pete Poston)


V NEW BUSINESS
none

VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
none

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT
none

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
none

IX ADJOURNMENT
4:56

Minutes 26 January 2010

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I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
3:21pm

In attendance:
Joel Alexander, Scott Beaver, Susan Daniels, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, David Doellinger, Bryan Dutton, Camila Gabaldon, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Kevin Helppie, Henry Huges, Elaina Jamieson, Pete Poston, Katherine Schmidt, Elisa Maroney, Peggy Pederson, Dana Uveland, Jason Waite, Zenon Zygmont

Ex-Officio:
Mark Wiess (For John Minahan), Kent Neely

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 12 January 2010 (document A)
Approved

III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate
Executive committee approved proposals from chemistry (which in review did impact the biology program, but was referred to executive committee by the senate), English, Dance, Interpreting, and Criminal Justice.

The Pastega Awards committee is now fully staffed with faculty. Bob Hautala, Irja Galvan, Kit Andrews and Hank Bersani will be serving. We have one student representative and will be contacting ASWOU about another.

The committee met with the honors committee. Their primary activities this year are reading thesis proposals and determining the process for finding the Jensen lecture series lecturer.
Challenges have been the filling of at large positions and revisions to honors curriculum.

Next time we will meet with the International Services committee.

John Minahan, Western Oregon University
Not present

Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate
Not present


Evan Sorce, ASWOU
Not present

Kent Neely, Provosts' Council
Provost Neely first ceded the floor to Mark Weiss. Mark Weiss, indicated that President Minahan sends regrets for being unable to attend today's meeting. He is with an athletic director candidate on campus today. Mark will entertain questions if there are any. There were none.

Provost Neely reported that just before the winter break there was a tri-board meeting. This board is made up of the boards of OHSU, the Community College system, and state board of education. The first half of the meeting was devoted to how universities are addressing learning outcomes that will benefit industries. Oregon is one of the LEAP states who are working to establish common learning outcomes. They are trying to determine what about a 4 year liberal arts education will prepare a student to be not just a good citizen, but also an economic asset to the state. One disturbing comment during this meeting came from the owner of a very large corporation who found it puzzling that there couldn't be common curricula and methods for general education at all institutions.
All three units have now adopted the international baccalaureate criteria and general education outcomes for community colleges.


IV OLD BUSINESS
Curriculum Proposal: Music Ensemble, Ike Nail (document B & C)
This proposal makes explicit what has implicitly been done. WOU ensembles have improved in quality and really are no longer open calls for admission. Proposal is to add "admission by audition" to the catalog. This stops students from registering, then dropping when they realize the level is higher than they anticipated. The proposal also adds a non-addition ensemble so that those who may not be at the level of the other ensembles still have an outlet for their musical interests.
Joel Alexander moved to approve, Sue Dauer seconded.
Passes unanimously.

Program Proposal: Biology, Bryan Dutton (document D)
Proposal increases number of lecture contact hours from 3 to 4 hours in each of their introductory courses. Credit would go from 4 to 5. They are removing some courses to make room for the credits and shifting some second year courses to accommodate chemistry changes.
They surveyed students about increasing lecture hours and they were in favor; it also aligns with other OUS institutions.
This sequence is an LACC option, so a note will need to be made in the catalog. It will not change the number of LACC credits needed; there are already 15 credit sequences.
Scott Beaver moved to approve, Pete Poston Seconded.,
Passes unanimously.


Program Proposal: ASL/English Interpreting, Elisa Maroney (document E)
Changes prerequisites from a 200 level to a 300 level. This class is conducted in ASL and students are now required to have 3 years of ASL before entering program.
Joel Alexander moved to approve, Dana Uveland seconded.
Passes unanimously.

Program Proposal: Military Science, Roy Susuico (document F--revised)
This proposal has been sent back to curriculum committee, we will see it again later.


V NEW BUSINESS
Curriculum Proposal: General Science, Phillip Wade (document G)
This proposal adds new general science class for education/pre education majors which will replace multiple other classes, with a net reduction from 6 fte to 4 fte for each class. In March the Oregon Science standards were altered, a new core was added as was a new vertical articulation for sciences, which means each of these areas will be taught in all grades as opposed to a focus on specific areas in specific years.
Program Proposal: Social Science, David Doellinger (document H)
They are revising 2 components of social science major.
Currently students need to do a concentration area within social science and also need to do a methods or theory course in their area of concentration. The proposal decouples area of concentration from methods and theory courses with the goal of having a strong core for social science majors.
The second component of change adds new theory and method courses which reflect new hires and interests.

Program Proposal: M.A. Interpreting, Elisa Maroney (document I & J)

Proposing a Masters degree in Interpreting. It would be the only one in the west. This program would provide interpreters working an opportunity for professional development and growth (Gallaudet is for entry level interpreters). They did a survey in planning this program and determined that there is demand for it. It will be a 47 credit degree.

Program Proposal: M.A. Teaching Interpreting, Elisa Maroney (document K, L & M)
This would be a Masters degree in Teaching Interpreting. It also would be the only one west of Boston. This would be a different method of delivery than the Boston program, which is primarily online. It is a 65 credit degree. To complete this degree, students would complete the courses for the MA in Interpreting, then some additional coursework. This program would also would have a different exit requirement from the MA in interpreting.

Program Proposal: Fire Services Administration, LaRon Tolley (document N)
Proposal eliminates the requirement of having a minor within the degree. Because of the nature of the program the majority are part-time students and employed full time off campus. Because our distance learning options are limited, those students end up meeting minor requirements elsewhere and transferring the credits in.
This degree dates back to 1978, when WOU became one of only 7 sites to partner with the National Fire Academy to offer this degree. We are the only one of those 7 to require a minor. To deliver content, WOU has partnered with EOU and University of Anchorage. The partnership with EOU is becoming more competitive than cooperative. Many students are taking the minor at EOU and transferring it back. A student currently can graduate with only 21 to 30 credits actually from WOU. The agreement with EOU lets their credits count as ours. We have lost several students to EOU in recent years, as their major requires the same number of credits, but with more flexibility since they do not require a minor.

There was some concern about removing the minor expressed by faculty.
By eliminating the minor, hopefully the major can be expanded to make it more robust. A timeline for this would be as soon as possible.

Memo: Modification of Add/Drop Deadlines, Associate Provost McDonald (document O)
Our add/drop/withdrawal policies are currently out of sync with other institutions.
This proposal would move the last day to drop to the end of the 4th week and create a withdrawal policy (currently only medical reasons are valid for a w). This shortens the window to drop a class, but adds withdrawal option.
He also proposes dropping all current penalties for add/drop in the first week. Right now, there is a financial penalty for dropping in the first week, even if class has not even met. After week 1 there would be a 25% penalty plus $20 transaction fee.

Faculty raised the concern that the memo changed both theadd and drop deadlines until the end of the 4th week. David McDonald said that he would be open to the idea of modifying that date and agreed to keep the add deadline as it currently is: end of 2nd week.

Additional New business:
Joel Alexander- when he presented the IFS resolution at the last meeting, it was with the intent of having it voted on for endorsement.
We will vote on endorsing the resolution at our next meeting.

Katherine Schmidt proposed to move the Executive Committee proposal from Committee reports to New Business. Camila Gabaldon Seconded.
Passes unanimously.
The proposal is that the executive committee can act on 800 level courses without bringing them to full senate. This is just a clarification, as these courses could appear to be a program change, which would typically go to the whole senate.

VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
Executive Committee, Scott Beaver: DEP 805 Courses
See above.

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT
none

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
none

IX ADJOURNMENT
4:43pm

Minutes: 12 January 2010

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I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
3:32 pm
In attendance:
Joel Alexander, Scott Grim, Sandra Hedgepeth, Bryan Dutton, Pete Poston, Kevin Helppie, Sue Dauer, David Doellinger, Bob Hautala, Dean Braa, Henry Hughes, Jason Waite, Mark Girod, Zenon Zygmont, Ryan Hickerson, Dana Uveland, Gay Timken, Cheryl Davis, Scott Beaver, Katherine Schmidt, Camila Gabaldon
Ex-Oficio:
John Minahan

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 24 NOVEMBER 2009 (document A)
Jason Waite will be added to the attendance.

III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate (document B)
The executive committee approved several minor course changes, as well as a few new courses.
We need representatives for the Pastega Awards Committee ( 1 COE, 1 LAS, 2 at large faculty positions).
Bob Hautala volunteered for an at large position, but we still need representatives. Please send an email to your divisions to fill the rest of these positions, as this committee needs to convene ASAP.
The online evaluation instrument team is now a joint team with the union. We still need to fill vacancies from CS, HPE, CA, BUS, and NS. If you do not have a representative on the team, this is your last chance, the committee will continue with the staffing it has.
Executive committee met with the Academic Infrastructure Committee, Dean McKiel and Bill Kernan.
This year, they are dealing with three main issues:
1. Wi-fi (this is mostly resolved),
2. Updating and revising the needs assessment document,
3. Collecting data about S&S budget differences between COE and LAS
Executive committee has also requested that they set up a webpage.
The next committee to meet with executive committee will be the honors committee.


John Minahan, Western Oregon University
Joel Alexander took over IFS at last meeting; he will do a good job and represent us well.
The Harlem Globetrotters will be here later in the term.
Enrollment is up 392 students over last year; we will be up at least 4% could be 8%.
The tax measures, if they do not pass, will result in a 10% budget reduction for WOU. This would come out of reserves and would institute furlough days for administrative staff. There will be no reduction in our central student services or courses due to this.
The Frohnmeyer proposal has hit some speed bumps and will not be a part of the leg special session. Board will consider in spring or summer and it will be a part of next session.
There have been a few changes in the Cottage. They have decided not to search for a new VP for the foundation. Instead, they will split the duties between two positions. An email detailing this will be sent out soon.

Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate
Not present

Evan Sorce, ASWOU
Not present

Kent Neely, Provosts' Council
Not present


IV OLD BUSINESS
Curriculum Proposal: Dance, Deborah Jones (document C) (not present)
This would add LACC designation for several courses and add "by consent of instructor" to another.
Motion to approve by Scott Grim, seconded by Bryan Dutton
Passes unanimously

Program Proposal: Educational Media Endorsement, Mary Bucy (document D)
Revamping the program, adding new courses to bring the program up to date, align with standards, infuse technology,
Motion to approve by Dana Uveland, seconded by Scott Beaver
Passes Unanimously

Program Proposal: MSEd Information Technology, Mary Bucy (document E)
Revised and brought up to date. Removing old courses, add portfolio option as an exit option. Also adds new 3 and 1 credit content area electives.
Motion to approve by Dana Uveland, seconded Dean Braa.
Motion passes: 20 Ayes, 1 Nay, 0 Abstentions

Program Proposal: MAT (document F) Steve Wojcikiewicz
Changes MAT program, streamlines it and matches more closely to other programs.
Faculty had questions about the reduction in credits and wanted to hear about the curricular, not just market, reasons for the change. Steve responded that the program would have more focused classes on areas in which they need preparation, allowing for better grasp of the content. Also, several of the credits removed were field experience hours, of which TSPC only requires 15.
This takes the program from the third largest in the state to the 4th smallest (in credit hours).
Joel Alexander moved to accept the changes, Dana Uveland seconded.
Passes Unanimously.

Program Proposal: MSEd in Language Arts (document G) Steve Wojcikiewicz
Changes to allow some core content to be taken in COE, this helps with contexts, scheduling, and number of courses offered. Was developed and approved with Humanities
Dean Braa moved to accept the changes, Henry Huges seconded.
Passes Unanimously .


V NEW BUSINESS
Curriculum Proposal: Music Ensemble, Ike Nail (document H & I)
No representative present

Curriculum Proposal: Chemistry, Pete Poston (document J)
They are proposing to change organic chemistry component of the chemistry program. This would take the lab hours out of the course hours, changing the course to 3 credits instead of 4. Lab hours would be offered in winter and spring. This matches up with other OUS institutions and helps students transfer.
There was some discussion about how this seemed to be a minor program change that did not impact other programs and the question was raised as to whether the Executive Committee could handle this.
Bob Hautala moved that this be removed from old business and that the executive committee deal with it.
Pete Poston seconded.
Passes unanimously

Program Proposal: Biology, Bryan Dutton (document K)
Proposal increases number of lecture contact hours from 3 to 4 hours in each of their introductory courses. Credit would go from 4 to 5. They are removing some courses to make room for the credits and shifting some second year courses to accommodate chemistry changes.
They surveyed students about increasing lecture hours and they were in favor; it also aligns with other OUS institutions.
This sequence is an LACC option, so a note will need to be made in the catalog. It will not change the number of LACC credits needed; there are already 15 credit sequences.


Program Proposal: ASL/English Interpreting, Elisa Maroney (document L)
This is a course change that will result in a change in the program prerequisites. The title is changing to Linguistics of ASL and the number will be 353. The description is also changing.
The prerequisites will change from ASL 6 to ASL 9 and Ling 210. The rationale for this is that students who took this last year had difficulty because it is conducted in ASL and the content was very difficult without a foundation in linguistics. For a frame of reference, 76% of the students who took ASL 8 and Ling 210 passed the course with a B or better, which is a requirement to get into the program.

Program Proposal: Military Science, Roy Susuico (document M)
They are trying to upgrade the minor. Army policy has changed and this will help them come into alignment. The will drop two history courses and add a military science course. An additional political science course has also been added as an option .
They are also changing writing courses from any writing class above WR 135 to any writing course above WR 135 or an approved writing intensive course.
Several titles and descriptions have been updated to align with what is being taught and courses that are no longer taught have been deleted.
There was significant discussion about the intent of the writing requirement and whether a writing intensive class really took the place of a writing course given their intent that "cadets know how to write." The conclusion was that the change in the wrting requirement would be dropped from this proposal.


VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
Academic Infrastructure Committee, Joe Harchanko
Report on Wi-Fi pilot project.
They had 3 objectives:
1) Increase access
2) Demonstrate utility
3) Investigate feasibility of different models on campus
They feel they have met all 3 objectives.
They conducted a survey of pilot project participants: 80% of respondents placed value at high or very high. The full results are included in the handout he distributed.
At the end of the project, they hoped to develop a campus wide, consistent policy. All 3 deans have agreed to support this and currently 87 faculty are using Wi-Fi.

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT
Joel Alexander
As a reaction/revision to the Frohnmeyer repoprt, Chancellor has developed a working document.
The report came about largely due to the fact that we have 6000 line items that must be judged by legislature. Most other state entities do not have this many. Many other university systems get a percentage and do not have to do line item approval. This has advantages, but creates some inefficiencies.
There are several possibilities: one separate entity, several entities, branch campuses. All of these would need to have accountability to legislature.
U of O and PSU have set up performance accountability matrices so that they would not have to be line itemed to the degree they currently are.
IFS had a report form OHSU to hear about the advantages and disadvantages of becoming a public corporation. One major issue is that there may be more revenue scrambling.
IFS has developed a resolution that would include all of the schools in the process going forward.
There were many questions about the implications and causes of the report and potential paths forward.

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
none

IX ADJOURNMENT
4:55

Minutes 24 November 2009

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Western Oregon University

Faculty Senate Minutes

24 November 2009, 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Columbia Room

Online Documents for Senatorial Review (www.wou.edu/president/facultysenate/blog):

A: Draft of Minutes: 10 November 2009

B: Proposal: Art Curriculum Change

C: Proposal:Humanities Curriculum Change

D: Paperwork: Humanities Curriculum Change

E: Proposal: Art Curriculum Changes

F & G: Paperwork: Art Curriculum Changes

H & I: Proposal: Piloting Online Teaching Evaluations

J: Proposal: Dance Curriculum Change

K: Proposal: Educational Media Endorsement Program Request

L: Proposal: MSEd Information Technology Program Request

M: Proposal: MAT Program Request

N: Proposal: MSEd Language Arts Program Request

O: Memo: LACC Ad Hoc Committee Update

P: Memo: Service Recognition and Plastic-Water-Bottle-Free Zones


I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL

3:30pm

In attendance:

Scott Beaver, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, David Doellinger, Bryan Dutton, Mark Girod, Scott Grimm, Bob Hautala, Sandy Hedgepeth, Solveig Holmquist, Henry Hughes, Elaina Jaimeson,Klay Kruczek, Katherine Schmidt, Carl Schroeder, Gay Timken, Dana Uveland, Zenon Zygmont, Jason Waite

Ex-Oficio:
Kent Neely, Evan Sorce

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 10 NOVEMBER 2009 (document A)

Approved with corrections to minor

III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS

Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate (document B)

In the last executive committee meeting, changes to the MS Education Health degree and art course deletions (photography is no longer an option) were approved.

The Academic Excellence Showcase letter was delivered electronically.

In discussion of the proposals that will be discussed today, it was determined that a library faculty member will be a part of the advisory committee for the Edcational Media Endorsement.

The executive committee also met with the Mary Harden, Chair of the Academic Requirements Committee (ARC) and Nancy France. Challenges for the ARC they presented included a lack of continuity in minutes from previous years and the approval of LACC courses. The LACC course approvals is a particular challenges, as the ARC doesn't have a set place in the approval process, there are no guidelines in place for this, and the ARC does not have representatives from all divisions.

On 1/8/2010 the Executive Committee will meet with the Academic Infrastructure Committee (AIC).

John Minahan, Western Oregon University

Mark Weiss presented on behalf of President Minahan.

All faculty are invited to holiday celebration on 12/9.

A focus of this report was the recently-released Frohnmeyer report. University of Oregon's ex-President Frohnmeyer was asked by the Chancellor to determine how the larger institutions would deal with inadequate state funding. His report diagnosed problems in funding and recommends a different governance structure akin to that at OHSU. Consideration of the four smaller schools is conspicuously absent and the Presidents of those schools are concerned. President Minahan has been involved in discussions on this topic around the state. There has been a lot of attention to this report and is likely more to come.


Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate

Not present.

Evan Sorce, ASWOU

He is starting to work with IFC; their next meeting is 12/3.

The students passed a resolution that President Minahan will sign and endorsing and supporting the American Dream Act.

He has already received the booklists for next term and thanks the faculty for supporting this.

The students are about to start a major voter education campaign for the tax measures. They will be bringing in pro and con speakers for the measures.

Kent Neely, Provosts' Council

Good news. When he met with both colleges and spoke about efforts to recruit and retain Latino students, both colleges expressed interest in classes for basic Spanish.

There will be 2 classes offered by DEP in Spanish winter term. Beginning Spanish language and culture will be on Tuesday evenings and Conversational Spanish (for those who may have rudimentary and want to brush up) will meet on Fridays at noon.

The last 2 weeks have been busy for OUS. He has attended meetings with the CIA and OUS re: new degree program and with NWACC on new standards

Wanda Clifton-Faber and the provost attended a meeting with NWACC to review the new standards, which will likely be passed.

The Provosts' Council met at Portland State University, Urban Center, 12 November.

* Discussed and recommended approval for new PhD in Cancer Biology at Oregon Health and Science University.
* Process for developing a Peer Comparator list is under redevelopment following the need to update that of OIT.
* Sabah Randhawa, Provost, Oregon State University and Marvin Kaiser, Dean, College of Liberal Arts, Portland State University, reported on progress in developing Professional Science Master's Degrees (PSM)at their institutions. All Provosts voiced support for developing such degrees and many (including WOU) noted that they had already developed or were developing such degrees.
* Reports were given by Bob Tuner, OUS staff and WOU Professor Emeritus, and Karen Sprague, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies, University of Oregon, regarding steps to comply with directives within SB342. Dr. Turner spoke about the alignment of International Baccalaureate credits across the 7 OUS campuses and the 17 Oregon community colleges.
* Senate Bill 342 which aligns International Baccalaureate credits for OUS institutions and identifies general education outcomes and criteria.
o A unified policy about recognition and awarding of college credit for IB classes taken in high school (Attachment: IB Alignment Policy v6 11 02 2009.docx)
o General ed outcomes were established by an OUS wide committee (including WOU's Carol Harding, Michael Ward, Diane Tarter and Lonnie Guralnick) and with consensus by all committee members (Attachment: IB alignment policy context letter 11 02 09.docx)


Provosts met with the Community College Council of Instructional Administrators, University Place, Portland State University campus 13 November.

* Provosts and their Community College counterparts (CIA) affirmed and endorsed the work that had taken place to fulfill the charges on SB342 and SB442 (Attachment: General Education Outcomes and Criteria - FINAL 9-2-09.pdf). Now the proposals will go before the Joint Boards Articulation Commission (JBAC). JBAC is a policy and action-oriented group, established in 1992 by the Oregon Board of Education and the Oregon Board of Higher Education.
* A good deal of discussion followed a presentation by Larry Galizio (new OUS staff member) regarding the possibility of converting both OUS institutions and community colleges to semesters. SB442 mandated that the conversion possibility be studied. (Attachments: Semester conversion pros-cons.doc, Semester conversion OSBHE Chronology.doc, Semester conversion info from other states.doc)
* Similarly, more conversation surrounded the issues of rural access and success another aspect of SB442. Mr. Galizio will pursue that issue as well.

Last week there was a meeting about HB 3093 between OUS and community colleges
This bill mandates that a plan be developed to deliver applied baccalaureate degrees (Attachment: HB 3093 Applied Bacc - A-Engrossed.pdf). These are currently offered in all but 11 states. Essentially these degrees are for people with AAOS degrees who have worked out in the world, but need a BA. In this case, they would come back to the university to get the general education.

IV OLD BUSINESS

Curriculum Proposal: Humanities, Jason Waite (document C & D)

Request is to change from 64 to 75 credits. Result of assessment of portfolios. The have found a growing reliance on LACC double dipping, creating less upper division work.

The 64 credit major is left over from before double-dipping was allowed.Last week the question of how long the degree takes was raised. The answer is it depends on the student. The degree can go rather quickly. A student starting as a Freshman takes about the same timeto complet as with other majors.

Approval was moved by Henry Hughes

Seconded Gay Timken

It was unanimously approved.


Curriculum Proposal: Art, Jodie Raborn (documents E, F, & G)

Add drawing as a focus area for major/minor, reorganize sequence, ad classes

Approval was moved by Bryan Dutton

Seconded Sandy Hedgepath

It was unanimously approved.

Proposal: Online Teaching Evaluation Pilot, Wanda Clifton-Faber (document H & I)

Proposing a beta test of an online system during winter term, instead of paper and pencil with SIR, saves significant funding and lots of paper.

Carl Schroder moved that we beta test of an online evaluation system during winter term.

Seconded by ?

Faculty Had the following questions:
Q: What questions would be used for winter term and how to get students to do the evaluations.

A:There are already 13 questions since we are using a revised version of U of O's forms. These could be used. She (Wanda Clifton-Faber) has asked for premier parking spaces from the parking committee to be used as an incentive for completing the evaluations.

Q: Is there a place for comments?

A: Yes, there are 2 places.

Q: Will we eventually do it every term?

A: Yes.

Q: If an instructor makes it a requirement that they complete one, is there any proof that students have done it?
A: It may be possible to generate something saying that they completed it.

Q: Our target is currently 50%. Can you report whether 50% of enrollees have completed the survey?
A: Possibly.

Q: Is this academic year's evaluation typically given in winter?

A: Yes. These would be the evaluations used in tenure and promotion,.

Q: So the 13 questions would be the ones given?

A: We are trying to get over the 45 question current instrument

Mark Girod Commented that there are many issues here, but if we do this we should do this correctly. If it means bringing together a body of faculty and taking time then we should do that.

Gay Timken commented that we also need to find a way for PRCs to understand a changed system. Can we as a body provide some guidelines for PRCs?

Wanda commented that we could make exceptions for pilot to those going up for tenure.

Cheryl Davis had questions about timelines and how it would actually be implemented, stating that it feels a little rushed because we are at the end of fall.

Wanda Clifton-Faber responded that we have to order SIR forms next week.

Cheryl responded that those timelines make it feel as though we are not going to have time to do a thorough job.

Jason Waite added that the timeline really speaks to whether we should move forward; We would have a very limited amount of time.

Wanda responded that we are coming up with a prototype,not the "drive model."

Klay Kruzcek inquired as to why this has to be done in winter.
Scott beaver responded that it is contractual and has not been opened as a bargaining point.

Zenon Zygmont observed that many faculty decisions are made before this data would be available.

Dean Rosselli addedthis data would go into annual reports, post-tenure reports, etc. The data would be used in next year's tenure and promotion files.

Mark Girod presented a proposal from the executive committee that senators would return to divisions and recruit representatives to serve on a new committee to develop questions.

Bryan Dutton suggested this as a friendly amendment to Carl Schroder's motion. Carl accepted the amendment.

The motion passed with 2 abstentions.


Klay Kruzcek moved that we add a student to the faculty committee.

Ryan Hickerson seconded.

The motion passed unanimously.


V NEW BUSINESS

Curriculum Proposal: Dance, Deborah Jones (document J)

No sponsor present

Program Proposal: Educational Media Endorsement, Mary Bucy (document K)

Educational Media Endorsement program has been on the books for many years, but has not been in the catalog since 1996. It has been taught since 1996, but usually by having students take courses elsewhere and transfer them in. The major problem in offereing these ciourses has been finding individuals qualified to teach these courses. Now they have found retiring school librarians who are interested in teaching

Summary of changes:

Rather than having a prerequisite on technology, they have included that in the program and moved children's literature to a prerequisite

Media and information literacy have been divided into two courses because they are two different concepts: evaluating what you are getting and evaluating what you are finding.

Courses have been updated

TSPC now requires two practica, so there are now two in the degree.

Putting together an advisory group will include faculty from our library, staff from the school districts, and COE faculty.

Scott- mentioned that faculty are retiring faculty from schools in the areas. Is there a plan for continuity? Yes, advisory committee would be handling that

Program Proposal: MSEd Information Technology, Mary Bucy (document L)\

This degree is separate from all other MSEd courses and has its own core. The content area electives are wide open, selecting from CSE course work Students have to take 21 credit hours, up to six of which can be skills courses.

This proposal is asking to change courses to align with what is currently taught as well as offer a new exit option.

Currently, students can do either a professional project or comps but the faculty would like to offer a new exit (a portfolio), as many studnets in this program are not teachers.. In the portfolio, they would have to demonstrate a familiarity with literature, how they have mastered national educational technology standards and include a selection of work illustrating how they have mastered skills. Students would have to submit an intent to complete a portfolio early on.

Program Proposal: MAT, Marie LeJeune (document M)

Needed to revise MAT program in teacher education (initial licensure program).It had been out of compliance with graduate hours for the college.

An exit survey helpedthem revise the program to meet gaps and come more into alignment. In this proposal, the MAT will go from 57 to 53 credits, which allows them to be within graduate study requirements. To come up with the cchanges, they studied the other MAT programs and tried to make theirs rigorous, but competitive as well.

Currently, four cohorts are admited per year, 2 in the fall and 2 online. Revised, cohorts will be entering in June and Septembe which gives a Summer break and allows students to be in a field experience for an entire year. This also the delivery of the content in their coursework inn a way that is developmentally appropriate.

Content pedagogy has changed from 2 to 6 credits, which is more in line with other initial licensure programs.

A professional seminar runs throughout the program, which helps scaffold them through their professional project. The exit will be professional project with option for thesis

Program Proposal: MSEd in Language Arts, Marie LeJeune (document N)

Currently, education is not listed as an area that they can takecontent from. This proposal adds education in as an area fromm which they can take courses.This will expand the offerings for students, as many courses are not taught at times when practicing students can take them.

VI COMMITTEE REPORTS

LACC Ad Hoc Committee, Tom Bergeron (document O)

The provided memo is his report and he is willing to entertain questions.

Gay Timken inquired about how the writing part came about.
Tom responded that feedback the committee received was that writing on campus is not strong. The strongest feedback was that they needed to do more research, which is what is being done with the samples being requested.

Elaina Jamieson asked f bad writing isa common problem at other universities and if informaiton about how we compare is available.
Tom responded that that has not been investigated.

Evan Sorce commented that, for some majors, it is hard for students to get the courses they need, as they are offered only once a year. The requirement of a 300 level writing course would tax students. Many majors already have a lot of writing.

Dean Rosselli asked about the writing portfolio for all students, commenting that it seems pretty big and that she wondered if the committee has any ideas about how that would work.

Tom responded that they are still working on that. They have talked about a fee that would pay readers.

Dean Rosselli commented that LACC committee is very much comprised of people teaching LACCs, since a portfolio would come at the end of the program, it might be useful to include individuals teaching upper division.

Tom responded that it is a pretty big committee. There are 21 people on the committee.

Mark Girod added that programs may already have existing portfolios that would deal with these issues in place of this.

Tom will report again in March.


VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT

none


VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME

Service Recognition and Plastic-Water-Bottle-Free Zones, Katherine Schmidt (document P)

Have a gift for senators and committee chair people. String attached is that office will be designated as a water bottle free zone.

IX ADJOURNMENT

4:55

Minutes: 10 November 2009

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I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
The meeting was called to order at 3:32 pm.
In attendance:
Scott Beaver, Dean Braa, Tracy Smiles (for Sue Dauer), Cheryl Davis, David Doellinger, Bryan Dutton, Camila Gabaldon, Mark Girod, Scott Grim, Bob Hautala, Sandy Hedgepeth, Solveig Holmquist, Elaina Jaimeson, Klay Kruczek, Carl Schroeder, Gay Timken, Dana Uveland, Jason Waite, Zenon Zygmont, Katherine Schmidt
Ex-Officio:
John Minahan, Kent Neely, Evan Sorce

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 27 OCTOBER 2009 (document A)

Minutes were approved, with typos and name misspellings corrected.

III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS

Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate
We would like an additional representative for the Latino committee. Currently Maria Dantas-Whitney and Jason Waite are our representatives. Any one interested, please let President Schmidt know.
We also need alternate for the finance committee with Mark Weiss. This committee is informed of WOU's finances, disseminates information about the finances, and is advisory to President Minahan. Currently Bryan Dutton and President Schmidt are representatives, but because of potential scheduling issues a volunteer to serve as an alternate is needed. Cheryl Davis volunteered.
President Schmidt passed on a reminder about the H1N1 policy from Provost Neely. Faculty need to be flexible. Don't expect doctor's notes for student absences this term.
The Executive Committee met with the Graduate and Curriculum Committees last week.

The graduate committee will be updating thesis guidelines, creating an online handbook, creating guidelines for the exit process and working with the library on an online repository for theses this year.
The Curriculum Committee is continuing to work out bugs in the online proposal system. They have a goal of April for adding an "edit" feature to the online system. They are also hoping to revisit the diversity guidelines.
Both committees are working with DEP on 800 level classes.

The next committee that will meet with the Executive Committee is the Academic Requirements Committee.


John Minahan, Western Oregon University
President Minahan recently sent out an email with budget information in addition to the presentation to the Senate done by Mark Weiss and wanted to know if there were questions about either of those.
At the senate's request, he provided a follow up on OUS fund balance "fishing."
The Legislative Fiscal office has asked for a report. We have opposed it, but had to fill out the paperwork. Some legislatures define fund balances as fat and are looking to use these. A lot of lobbying has been done, though, and it does not look like there are enough votes to take the balances.

President Minahan reports that he is happy to be back from China, though it was a productive trip. We have two new agreements with universities in China. One will bring upwards of 50 students into MIS program. Another will bring two plus two majors into a variety of disciplines. In addition, one of the universities would like us to jointly operate an English language center in China for the students before they come over, which we would likely do during the summer (due to the location of this university). This will present opportunities for our students and faculty in China
In the next 18 months, he would like to add approximately 100 international students, primarily at the Masters level.

President Minahan asked Dave MacDonald to give a summary of a press release that was released by OUS on Wednesday. The release is on enrollment across OUS system. The bottom line is that enrollments are up 5.8%, with all campuses showing increases, though SOU was the least. WOU was at 5.7% (right in the middle). Fewer Oregon residents came to OUS campuses at the OUS level (he attributes this to rise in community college enrollments), so the growth was fueled by non-resident and transfer students. There is also increased retention and diversity. WOU's diversity went up at a higher rate, and he expects we will continue to be the most diverse campus in OUS. Graduate students increased 4% system-wide, at WOU the increase was 17%.
He also distributed flyer for the new health and wellness center that was just produced.


Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate
Not present

Evan Sorce, ASWOU
Apologized for missing meetings. He informed the senate that he has started IFC process and their first meeting will be 11/19 at 7pm in the Oregon Room (WUC). They will also have a training on 11/22 at 5pm. He has also scheduled a meeting on December 3, but that date may be changed.
He has been surveying students about issues that impact them:

Will work with President Minahan on legislation for Federal Dream Act and SAFRA
Additionally, catering seems to be an issue of importance to students. He will work on a plan to have different pricing for students.

Kent Neely, Provosts' Council
There has not been a provost's council meeting since his last report. They are scheduled to meet later in the week in Portland. He expects to discuss two senate bills: 342, which deals with aligning the international baccalaureate credits across the system, and 442, which is focused on access for rural students and the conversion to a semester system. On Friday they will meet with their community college counter parts to discuss those bill and House Bill 3090 which focuses on instituting applied baccalaureate degrees at all higher education institutions in the state.


IV OLD BUSINESS
Proposal: Credit by Exam Policy, Klay Kruczek of ARC (document B)
The proposal is to change the credit by exam policy for a little more flexibility for departments to make decisions about courses that students may receive credit by exam.
Dean Braa moved for approval, Scott Beaver seconded.
Passed unanimously.

A second part of this proposal is to insert instructions on the website and in the catalog.
Dean Braa moved for approval, Bryan Dutton seconded.
Passed unanimously.

Proposal: Academic Excellence Showcase Support, Bryan Dutton (document C)
The motion was for the Senate to support the 2010 showcase.
Dean Braa moved for approval, Klay Kruczek seconded.
Passed unanimously.

This motion was for the Executive committee to write a letter in support of the showcase to all faculty, asking that they set aside this class time.
Klay Kruczek moved for approval, Elaina Jamieson seconded.
Passed unanimously.

V NEW BUSINESS
Curriculum Proposal: Humanities, Henry Hughes (document D & E)
Jason Waite presented for Henry Hughes.
The Humanities major is unique in that it has the potential for 18 LACCs to count toward major (double-dipping), leaving a smaller number of hours that are devoted exclusively to the major. This has resulted in a watering-down of the major, as has been evidenced by the quality of recent senior projects.
This proposal would raise major from 64 hours to 75 and limit the number of LACCs to 7.
Questions included inquiries about how long it takes to finish the major on average (did not know), why credits were being added not just limiting the double-dipping (that was the original proposal, but Curriculum Committee sent it back because this would be in opposition to a current campus policy) and a comment that 75 credits is not an unusually large major.

Curriculum Proposal: Art, Jodie Raborn (documents F, G, & H)
This is a proposal to add drawing as a concentration area in Art. They need to move the numbers around (currently there are no 200 level drawing classes) and hope that by adding more drawing courses, they can improve performance in other areas where more drawing would be preferred (e.g, graphic design).

Proposal: Online Teaching Evaluation Pilot, Wanda Clifton-Faber (document I & J)
This proposal is that we go to an online, 13 question course evaluation form based on U of O evaluation as a pilot project in winter term. Those 13 questions would be revised by faculty. She would like to not administer the paper SIR this winter as it costs over $8000. Senators will receive credentials so that they can show this system to their divisions.
Many questions centered on how to get student participation in an online form, when it is often challenging to get them to fill out a paper form that is handed out. Ideas for incentives (e.g, extra-credit) or more punitive (e.g, hold grades) means were briefly explored.
This system would cost about $2500 and could be used as many times as we want, as opposed to SIR, which coasts $8000 per administration. Eventually, the system could be (almost) cost-free, as we could host it locally. Results would be available quickly and in a usable format (so faculty could make graphs, charts, etc.).


VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
none

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT
none

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
New Residence Hall, Part II: Living and Learning, Tina Fuchs (document K)
Postponed

IX ADJOURNMENT
4:13pm

Minutes 27 October 2009

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I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
In attendance:
Scott Beaver, Dean Braa, Sue Dauer, E. Michelle Pardew (for Cheryl Davis), David Doellinger, Bryan Dutton, Camila Gabaldon, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Sandy Hedgepath, Solveig Holmquist, Henry Hughes, Elaina Jamieson, Katherine Schmidt, Carl Schroder, Gay Timken, Jason Waite, John Leadley (for Zenon Zygmont)
Ex-Oficio: Mark Weiss (for John Minahan), Dave MacDonald (for John Minahan), Kent Neely

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 13 OCTOBER 2009 (document A)

III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate


  • President Schmidt reminded the senate of the new curriculum deadline: 12 January 2010

  • On November 24, we will get an update from Tom Bergeron on the LACC review committee, as well as projection for the year.

  • A letter of thanks has been sent to Peter Callero for his PEBB service.

  • Practical tip: Introduce your division to the portal and to the online curriculum proposal submission process

  • The executive committee has collaborated with the committee on committees to form a roll out plan for our committee charge review process this year. Each committee will submit a memo to the executive committee when they complete their new charges. These will subsequently be voted on by the Senate.

  • On November 6, the executive committee will be meeting with the Curriculum and Graduate committees.


John Minahan, Western Oregon University (document B)
Dave MacDonald and Mark Weiss gave this report on behalf of the president.

  • Dave Macdonald reported on enrollment:

  • The state has more students going to college than ever:

  • OUS is expecting 6% system-wide increase, though one campus will be below that number.

  • Community colleges are reporting a 15-20% increase

  • We are in the 3rd year in a row of record enrollments; only a few other institutions can make this claim (OSU, PSU).

  • As of Monday (10/26/09) enrollment was 5690; this morning it was 5716.

  • Graduate enrollment is up 20%, freshman enrollment is up 5% and sophomore enrollment is up 10%.

  • The impact of a larger sophomore class is increasing numbers in 200-level classes, which puts pressure on the departments.

  • Latino growth is 15%. This group is key to continued growth.

  • The increase in Latino students was not at the expense of other minority groups - our class is more diverse than last year and we were already the most diverse OUS campus. This can be attributed at least somewhat to the presence of faculty. When visiting the campus, prospective students see faculty, not just staff. Unlike other campuses, our preview days have faculty, which is mentioned all of the time by students who choose to come.

  • Our international student numbers are steady, despite terrible global economy.

  • Looking forward we need to continue to move retention up, continue to grow Latino students and other underserved populations, increase graduate student numbers, increase the diversity of our international students.

  • Overall we anticipate 4-6% growth for next year.

  • Challenges: Budget - need to be mindful, families are having a hard time paying for college. The opportunity grant is declining and the perception is being built that college is more expensive. We need to think about how we move forward with the Tuition promise - Can we sustain it? We need to be aware of the enrollment plans of other institutions and we need to maintain momentum.

  • Gay Timken asked how the administration plans to deal with faculty and classroom needs with increasing numbers, since we are already quite tight.

  • Dave MacDonald responded that the Provost and Deans will be looking at this and that they are already keeping enrollment numbers lower than they possibly could go, so that we can have time to adjust. Mark Weiss added that we are opening a new classroom building.

  • Mark Weiss reported on the financial situation

  • Last year OUS and WOU were asked to come up with plans for reduction up to 30% (about a 6 million dollar decrease). The back of the handout he gave (posted on senate site) sums up appropriation levels, last year and this. Fortunately 30% cut did not occur we received approximately and 11% reduction.

  • During 2009, the economy worsened and we received 5% cuts for over the biennium.

  • This year the 18.2 million we are initially budgeted is supplemented in a large degree by the federal recovery funds without those funds, the cut would have been deeper. Those funds are available this biennium, our understanding is that they will go away next biennium. To address the cuts, universities have responded differently (staff cuts, etc.).

  • The report he handed out will be the one which we report on for the rest of the year.

  • Ending last year we had a fund balance of about $6.1 million, which is about 13% of our budget. Our fiscal goal is to have a fund balance of 10-20%, with a goal of about 15%. Where we ended was not a bad place, considering that state funds were reduced in the last 6 months of the year. Other institutions need to keep a fund balance of 5-10%. Because of the tuition promise we need to have a higher balance, since we can only raise tuition for approximately ¼ of our students, while the other schools can raise it for everyone.

  • This year they are preliminarily projecting a small surplus of $279,000. There are many risks that will likely curtail that surplus and make it a deficit. The current plan will get us to a 13.4% fund balance at the end of the year.

  • The increase in salary expenditures is based on new faculty in both colleges and new staff positions. The staff positions existed in the past and we want to show that we feel it is important to reinvest in ourselves.

  • The top ½ of sheet is education and general funds. The center is the auxiliary enterprises (Housing and dining, health center, bookstore, etc.). The only significant change in those operations is the $20 million in debt for our learning/living center.

  • Last sections is designated operations (Parking, telecomm, DEP, intensive English program, etc.).

  • The back of the page lists risks that may occur, including if the tax measures are voted down:

  • WOU has been asked by OUS how they would respond to a worsening Oregon economy; their response: 1/3 from fund balances, 1/3 from services and supplies, and 1/3 through a furlough program for non-union contract employees.

  • The state is committed to maintain 2005-2006 funding levels to keep federal funds, but some states have asked for exceptions, so this may not be a given.

  • We've been asked to identify reserve balances (all) including auxiliary fund balances. At WOU, this includes money that we have put away to pay off the $20 million debt for the live/learn center. These could be "swept" by the state.

  • If any OUS institutions require additional help, it will likely come at the expense of the others.

  • Next year, we anticipate the federal funds that have filled a gap for us to be gone.

  • Enrollment - If we need to go away from the tuition promise, it could have an impact on enrollment.

  • Value of the PERS trust fund has been hugely reduced and there are likely to be huge increases in the contributions in the next years, (legal limit is 6% per year) and he has been told to expect that.

  • Expectation by all of us that salary increases will occur - need to find funds for this.

  • There was considerable concern over the idea that money that has been designated (for the building) could be taken. Since it has not been spent, it is seen by the state as available.

Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate
Not present
Evan Sorce, ASWOU
Not present
Kent Neely, Provosts' Council
No report today to make time for an expanded president's report.

IV OLD BUSINESS
none

V NEW BUSINESS
Credit by Exam Policy, Klay Kruzcek of ARC (document C)


  • Under the current credit by exam policy, students can challenge a course by taking an exam, and, if the department feels they have successfully passed, they can get credit for that course. A student can not get credit by exam for a course that has a lower number than a class that they have taken.

  • In math, this is an issue, because it is possible for students to take a class, such as calculus in high school, without getting AP or college credit. If they then come to WOU and enroll in calculus 4, that limits the number of other math credits that are available for them to take, making it hard to complete the degree with sufficient credits.

  • The ARC is recommending that the wording "except when specifically allowed by that department" be added to the policy to provide some flexibility and discretion on the part of departments. This proposal would also clean up the language in the catalog.

  • John Leadley asked for clarification that the only current option for these students is to challenge the lower division courses before starting in their math program at WOU. This was confirmed.

Academic Excellence Showcase Endorsement, Bryan Dutton (document D)


  • Bryan Dutton came on behalf of the showcase planning committee to ask the senate for an endorsement of the Showcase, which is held in the spring and sponsored by Phi Kappa Phi and PURE. The senate has done this in previous years, usually by having the executive committee draft a letter to campus in support of the showcase, which is then distributed to campus.

  • Dean Braa added that [the showcase] is a good thing.

Enrollment Numbers, Associate Provost David McDonald (document E)
This was presented as part of the President's report.

VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
none

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORT
none

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
New Residence Hall, Part I: Sustainability, Tina Fuchs (document F)


  • Tina Fuchs gave the first part of a two part report on the new sustainable live/learn residence hall/classroom building being constructed on campus. This part of the presentation focused on the sustainability aspects of the new building. She will focus on the live/learn aspects next time.

  • The new building is being built in the Grove, which will make much of this space more useful for students (currently it is to wet to use for much of the year). They did have to cut down trees to do this, but those trees, as well as some from near the APSC building will be re-used in the project (approximately 31 tables, also wall panels and a grand staircase).

  • They are hoping to design a building that will make students more thoughtful about how they use energy in their rooms. Green qualities are included in all aspects of the construction of building. They are building using the LEED standards, with a goal of reaching platinum status for this building.

  • The building will have low flow faucets, energy efficient appliances, dual flush toilets, waterless urinals and use environmentally friendly cleaning products. There will be a 35,000 gallon cement tank to collect runoff from roof and sidewalks which will have a system to put the "cleaner" collected water into the system to flush toilets. She anticipates that the tank will be pretty full through fall and winter months.

  • The building is oriented in the best way to collect sunlight from the west.

  • Each room will have a dual plug system, which includes some plugs that can be turned off (for plugging in cell phone chargers, etc.) when not actively being used. Rooms will also have light sensors to automatically turn on and off lights.

  • The contractor for this building is known for their work on LEED buildings. They are very organized and do a good job of managing waste. They are also using mostly local and regional material (approximately 90%) from within 500 miles of the site.

  • During construction all of the ducts will be sealed to keep hazardous materials from going into the system before the building is open. They are also using low VOC materials.

  • Educational messages and plaques will be throughout the building, including monitors that will be set up so students know how much energy is being used in different parts of the building at any time. Among these will be a large LCD in lobby (which will hopefully inspire competition to be green).

  • Our target is 54 LEED points for platinum (the platinum range is 52-69 points). If we do this, we would be the largest residence hall to achieve platinum. Smaller buildings have done it, including one 10 bed hall at Duke, but none of this size.

IX ADJOURNMENT
4:38 pm

Minutes October 13, 2009

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I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
The meeting was called to order at 4:33 pm
In attendance: Bryan Dutton, Sandy Hedgepeth, Zenon Zygmont, Elaina Janieson, Dean Braa, David Doellinger, Bob Hautala, Joel Alexander, Jason Waite, Henry Hughes, Gay Timken, Sue Dauer, Dana Uveland, Solveig Holmquist, Cheryl Davis, Mark Girod, Scott Beaver, Katherine Schmidt, Camila Gabaldon
Ex-Officio: John Minahan, Kent Neely

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 14 July 2009 (document A)
Approved without amendment.

III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate (document B)

  • Reminded the senate that the new deadline for proposals to be to either the Curriculum Committee or Graduate Committee for inclusion in next year's catalog is 12th January 2010.

  • Displayed the revised senate website and reminded senators to visit the site prior to the meeting and/or bring laptops to the meetings, as paper copies of agenda items will not be available at meetings

  • President Schmidt received no comments on NWCCU feedback process.

  • President Schmidt requested that senators remind their divisions to:

  • update their website with office hours, class schedules, etc. (a request from the students)

  • include a senate report as a regular part of division meeting agendas so that Senators can communicate more effectively what is happening

  • We had great turn out at our new senator orientation (16) and Planning meeting (13)

  • At these sessions, we came up with 2 out of 3 priorities for year

  • Sustainability

  • Strengthening and reestablishing communication with senate committees. Exec will be meeting with chairs and directors associated with committees

  • The third priority is that senate committees are to revise charges by the end of the academic year
    Executive committee will be meeting with Committee on Comommittees first to establish the roll-out process for the revisions.

  • Informed the senate that all reports will be limited to 10 minutes in length. Sponsors will be given a 2 minute warning and told when time is out.

John Minahan, Western Oregon University

  • Enrollment was 5500 students as of this morning; many of these are part time.

  • We have a freshman class of 950 (had aimed for 1000). This is still 48 more than last year.

  • We are down about 50 transfer students and are down in continuing freshman, however this is expected since last year's freshman class was small. Our continuing numbers in the other classes are strong.

  • We have good numbers in international students - steady from last year - which is good considering there is more competition for these students from other institutions in the area.

  • Made significant progress in the number of Hispanic students, as well as other ethnic minority groups.

  • Graduate masters program up enrollment is up 85 to 452 students. These are extraordinarily good numbers.

  • We are about where it was anticipated we would be with budget.

  • WOU administration is currently working on an exercise for 10% reduction in January/February, which is most likely to happen if ballot measures fail. This is not a surprise. The troubling piece is that the Legislative Fiscal Office also wanted to know our fund balances. Dr. Minahan has written a protest letter regarding this request, as the fund balances are tuition money and not general fund and looking at those funds crosses a boundary.

Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate
Not present

Evan Sorce, ASWOU
Not present

Kent Neely, Provosts' Council

  • Provosts' Council met at OIT on 10/13/09. This meeting was a breath of fresh air after last years discussion of cuts, holds, etc.

  • Discussed new OUS admission system either automatic or standard based on performance in (specific) college prep classes. There was some concern on the part of the admissions officers on exactly what "automatic" means.

  • A few Senate bills and their implementation were discussed:

  • Senate bill 342: Deals with the international baccalaureate program and how these will be accepted across OUS. Now that it is a policy, it will be forwarded to board and officers of community colleges for approval. Also included are general education outcomes for community colleges (AAOT). (See attached)

  • Senate 442: Amalgamation of regional colleges was originally included in this, but has been removed, turning the focus now to access and success of rural community students and the possible conversion to semester system for OUS. If the semester changed happened, it would not be mandatory, but some of the community colleges might also do it. Larry Galaciao is the lead on this.

  • There is no longer a moratorium on academic program proposals, however, there is renewed and more intense scrutiny of them. The primary questions being asked are: Have students requested them, have industries? When the new programs are approved, the Academic Strategies Committee will review these, not the full board, after the Provosts' Council.

  • This time there were 2 programs: A BA/BS in Earth science from PSU and a graduate degree in medical statistics from OHSU.

  • There was some discussion among the senators about the costs, efficiencies and pedagogical changes a switch to a semester system could make. Generally, most comments indicated that this could be a positive change.

IV OLD BUSINESS

  • Curriculum Proposal: Business Administration, H. Bahari-Kashani & J. Leadley (documents C & D)

  • Primarily, this change formalizes what has temporarily been in effect since the first term: changing the business classes from 3 to 4 credits. The old program was never in place; teaching at 3 credits did not happen at all. Since this decision was during the first term of program, based on experience, they do not have any data to show the need (program never really existed).

  • Also made minor changes to align business and computer science courses and distribution.
  • Dean Braa moved to approve
    Bryan Dutton Seconded
    Motion passed unanimously


V NEW BUSINESS
PEBB Open Enrollment, H. McDaniel (document E)

  • It is really important that everyone do open enrollment this year. Blue Cross Blue Shield will become PEBB Statewide (and will be administered by Providence Health Plans).

  • You will want to look up your provider on the PEBB website to make sure that they will be a provider in the new system. Most still will be, but in case not, HR has a form so that you can continue care if you are in the middle of a surgery, pregnancy, ongoing treatment, etc.

  • Feel free to contact Heather to talk about options.

  • Joel Alexander added that in IFS, it was mentioned that PEBB is worried about whether the system can handle too many people doing open enrollment in the last week. Heather mentioned that if the system crashes, HR does have paper forms available.

  • Joel added that there is a change for international travel - you need to go on the PEBB website and get your MedX form (also available in HR) before travelling internationally. This is very important since many countries are not aware of our new carrier and it can save you problems in case of an emergency abroad.
  • Dean Braa reminded the senate of the Service Peter Callero has given on our behalf to the PEBB board and made a motion that the Senate send a letter of thanks to Peter Callero for his service on PEBB board on our behalf.
    Seconded Scott Beaver.
    Unanimously approved

Interinstitutional Advising Assessment Project, K. Sullivan-Vance (document F)

  • WOU has been invited to participate in this project along with Concordia, PCC, PSU, OSU, UO and UP.

  • This project is looking a little more at faculty roles than previous student-centered projects.

  • It is currently going through WOU's IRB; PSU human research board has already approved it.

  • A goal is to try to tie advising to retention, as there is a great deal of lore, but not research, about the link between advising and retention.

  • They are looking at the importance that students and faculty attribute to advising functions. Also faculty experiences and how that impacts advising.

  • This is an overall look, not a critique of individuals.

  • Students will be contacted several times to take a survey, starting in February. Incentive for responding will be four $100 dollar bookstore certificates.

  • Faculty will also be getting emails - their incentive will be $500 in professional development money.

VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
none

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORTS
Report, J. Alexander

  • An emerging theme seems to be seamless nature that is desired outcome of high school to college matriculation. Last year's theme was panic (joke). Underlying that was an interest in what different senates do on their campuses, with the discovery that there is lots of variability.

  • Senate Bill 342 was discussed, as on some campuses students can be admitted at the sophomore level, with sometimes up to 45 credits being earned through International Baccalaureate. On WOU's campus, we evaluate course by course.

  • Request to faculty: please participate in survey before 10/21 - particularly those in English and math: www.corestandards.org

  • Also, select math and reading faculty received a survey from OUS, please respond if you did.

  • IFS will be invited to tri-board meeting in January. The tri-board is the Higher education Board, Education Board, and Business Board.

  • Another concern, some Community Colleges are pushing to offer 4 year degrees in certain areas. These would be human-service degrees in areas that might impact some divisions on campus (e.g psychology, health).

VIII SUSTAINABILITY THEME
Online Submission System for Curriculum Changes, L. Burton, M. Ellis, & Z. Chen (document G)

  • New curriculum system available from the portal

  • Starting this evening or tomorrow morning, you will have a menu option for course or program requests. By Clicking on this, you can start the process.

  • The forms will check to make sure you have filled in appropriate fields. Once you have done that, you can attach files (as many as you want). After this, you will return to menu, where you can check the approval status.

  • Approvers will have an "approve course and program request program", where they will go to approve requests.

  • At this point there is no save or edit option, it is a short form and, really, if changes need to be made, they should be approved by all of the appropriate parties. Eventually, they hope to have a re-submit option in place, so fields could be copied from one proposal to another.

  • There were several questions about the saving and editing options, Michael and Laurie reminded folks that cutting a pasting would be easy between the forms.

  • Bryan Dutton suggested that form templates be made available so folks could think about what they wanted to type before getting to the actual form. Laurie said she would make these available on the Curriculum Committee page.

  • Michael and Laurie will work on developing a page so that Deans can review submitted proposals earlier in the process.

IX ADJOURNMENT: 4:41 PM

Draft Minutes 7/14/2009

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Western Oregon University
Faculty Senate Minutes
14 July 2009, 3:30-5:00 p.m.
Hamersly Library 107


Online Documents for Senatorial Review (www.wou.edu/president/facultysenate):
A: 26 May 2009 meeting minutes for corrections
B: FYI--27 May 2008 meeting minutes documenting NEW deadline for curriculum changes
C: FYI--Music Curriculum Changes, approved by Executive Committee
D: FYI--Theatre Curriculum Changes, approved by Executive Committee
E: Faculty Handbook Revision Process, Provost Neely
F: Business Administration Curriculum Changes
G: Textbook Rental Program, Associate Provost McDonald

I CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
The meeting was called to order at 3:30 PM
Attending:
Katherine Schmidt, Scott Beaver, Mark Girod, Zenon Zygmont, Elaina Jamieson
Sandra Hedgepath, Gay Timken, Camila Gabaldon, Bryan Dutton, David Doellinger, Dean Braa, Carl Schroder

Ex-Officio:
John Minihan, Evan Sorce, Dave MacDonald, Kent Neely, Joe Hutchinson

II CORRECTIONS AND APPROVAL OF MINUTES: 26 MAY 2009 (document A)
No corrections were submitted. The minutes were approved

III PRESIDENTS' REPORTS
Katherine Schmidt, Faculty Senate (documents B, C, and D)


  • There has been a change in the deadline for submitting curriculum changes to the Curriculum Committee. Please share the date [January ] with your Divisions immediately and persistently

  • The Executive Committee took the following actions at their last meeting:

    1. Approved curriculum changes for Music and Art.

    2. Agreed to change the website:

    3. Website as the main content location for upcoming meeting materials

    4. Soon-to-be-updated members list will be moved to a different page on the site

    5. The committee on committees will be updating lists and charges for all committees, these will be posted on the site

    6. Minutes of meetings will be pasted in to the blog for easy search and retrieval

  • There will be an orientation for new senators during new student week; both new and returning Senators are encouraged to attend.

  • There is now a cheat sheet for Robert's Rules of Order on the back of name tags, for the convenience of Senators.

  • The Senate planning meeting for the upcoming year will be 9/22/2009.

  • Bill Kernan has announced that faculty whose computers are being replaced this year will have the option of choosing whether their computer will be a laptop or desktop, Mac or PC. Senators are encouraged to consider requesting a laptop, so that they can bring it to meetings and save resources.

John Minahan, Western Oregon University


  • We have had 3 SOARs so far, which have resulted in a Freshman class of 791 frosh (39 more than last year). We have additional SOARs scheduled and we want to increase this number to 1000, as the Tuition Promise will be hard to hold without 1000 freshman.

  • The State legislature closed without balancing the budget, so budgeting will have to be re-opened. We are planning on 20% budget cut.

  • Composition of the incoming class is bimodal, with the income of parent-dependent students increasing and the income of independent students decreasing. We need to find a way to decrease this bimodality in order to maintain our first generation feel. A possible solution is more scholarships.

  • We have had a focus visit from NWACC and did not score high. Our systems of assessment were ok, but they way in which we use the assessment (e.g. to determine changes in curriculum) did badly. This was common with other institutions. We may need to be more careful about how we make curriculum changes. It may not be enough to say we think it is a good idea.

  • We are up 7.6% in total enrollment; Retention is "out of sight." Because retention rate is so high, more students are taking LACC in their year, meaning we are tight in sections for those courses and have fewer seats for freshmen. We will be adding sections - we cannot afford to lose students because there are no seats.

  • Tuition is up 9% for incoming students, this compares to U of O who is up 15%.

  • Otherwise, we are in good shape financially, though there are some concerns about the Tuition Promise. It does not seem right for the costs to be pushed entirely on to the freshmen, unless the enrollment numbers are very high and they are very rich. They have developed scenarios for making it work.

  • Also, potentially impacting our students this year, the Opportunity Grant will be cut off August 15. Dave MacDonald reported on behalf of the president that 1/3 of our students are eligible for opportunity grants and last year the cut off was in October. There is an effort to have winter and spring awards, but not optimistic.


Joe Hutchinson, Staff Senate


  • Announced that he will be coming to meetings and is pleased that there is a seat for the Staff Senate president

  • He has been working with Drs. Taylor and Killloran on an Emergency Management grant for the last 15 months. Last week they were informed they had received the grant and he is excited about the possibilities for upgrading and enhancing our systems at WOU.

Evan Sorce, ASWOU


  • Brought greetings from students. He looks forward to working with faculty and has been talking to students about what faculty can do to enhance their learning at WOU, including booklists that are availabe well in advance of the beginning of classes.
  • Sustainability is his big issue, more recycling bins, etc.

  • There was some discussuion about the cost of texbooks at the bookstore as compared to other sources. Zenon Zygmont, who was on textbook committee in 2003 remarked that at that time, the bookstore's mark up was 30% new and 35% used. Mark Weiss mentioned that at the root of this is the question of whether we want a bookstore on campus or not. The bookstore is supposed to break even at the end of the year. It has not for the last several years.


Kent Neely, Provosts' Council

  • He had three meetings last week with OUS regarding academic strategies and thanked Dean Rosselli for attending the Provosts' Council in his place.
  • The Academic Strategies committee had 5 priorities that were presented by Jim Fransisconi
    1. Revise institutional missions
    2. Making sure critical needs are being met in the state (teacher education, health professions, etc.)
    3. A recruitment strategy for increasing participation from students in rural Oregon
    4. Latino students parity and success
    5. Priorities for increasing completion and retention
  • The group will likely grow
  • Chancellor spoke of line item veto by governor
  • At board meeting there was a dramatic showing of students interested in keeping tuition low
  • U of O - showcased electronic course evaluation system "what do you think" we are doing a beta test of a similar system this fall
  • There is a moratorium on the board reviewing new programs, but the Provosts' Council did review some to be reviewed by the board when that moratorium is lifted

IV OLD BUSINESS
None

V NEW BUSINESS
Faculty Handbook Revision Process, Provost Neely (document E)


  • Last year, in reviewing the handbook, he realized it was old. Since this is is a critical piece of information for faculty, he looked into revising it. During that process, he learned that faculty had worked on revising it previously and he solicited additional review from that group.

  • The revisions are now almost complete. Wanda Clifton-Faber will be compiling them and they will go on the web, so that there is something in place for fall. The web document will be a live document, with regular opportunities for faculty and div chairs to comment and revise. Bryan Dutton added that the incoming senate and faculty union representatives have reviewed it.



Curriculum Proposals: Business Administration, Hamid Bahari-Kashani (document F)
John Leadley

  • This change would be to the Master of Science in Management and Information Systems. It changes the business courses in this degree from 3 to 4 credits.

  • It is felt that a 3 credits is not enough at the master's level and they have been temporarily been teaching the classes at the 4 credit level with more success.They are also dropping 1 class, so total credits stays approximately the same.

Textbook Rental Grant Proposal, Associate Provost McDonald (document G)


  • It costs $1120 per year for the average full time student to buy text books (varies by discipline). This average has gone up 50% since 96-97; It is one of those "hidden costs" of college

  • FIPSE program (Federal government) is running a grant that would allow universities to develop innovative programs for course material rental

  • There are 3 considerations
    1. Appropriate resource (determined by faculty)

    2. Cost to students

    3. Bookstore impact

  • There is a very short turn around on this, so WOU's chances are good.

  • There was much discussion about the potential impact of this program and the creative ways faculty have already begun utilizing to deal with this issue, including using articles instead of texts and putting them on eReserve and purchasing old editions of the books and making them available at the library.


Additional items?
none

VI COMMITTEE REPORTS
None

VII INTERINSTITUTIONAL FACULTY SENATE REPORTS
None

VIII ADJOURNMENT

Adjourned 4:21




Minutes Feb. 24, 2009

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Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, February 24th, 2009 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center


I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Scott Beaver, Roy Bennett, Mark Perlman for Susan Daniel, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, David Foster, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Shaun Huston, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Elisa Maroney, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Joe Peng, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite, Peggy Pedersen, Katherine Schmidt, Joe Harchenko

II. Corrections and approval of minutes from February 10th, 2009 meeting
Action: Minutes approved with minor corrections.

III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President, Mark Girod's Report

In executive session,
I. Approved course description changes to MUS 418 and MUS 518.
II. Chair of curriculum committee, Lorie Burton, has suggested that we re-examine the description of what qualifies a course for a "D" designation. Executive committee will bring a proposal to the Senate as to how this might unfold.
III. Emily Plec will convene the members of the Faculty Senate Awards Committee in an attempt to ensure that we are best meeting the wishes of contributing families and faculty senate.


President's report, Provost Neely for John Minahan:

Senator Hass has introduced Senate Bill 442 to the legislature, a bill that is meant to investigate the possibility of consolidating the regional institutions of higher education with other existing state universities. President Minahan took the initiative of contacting senator Hass last week and personally delivered a letter to the office of Senator Hass. The principal point in the letter was that Western Oregon University has distinguished itself as a unique university within the Oregon University System (by overcoming considerable financial challenges and continuing to demonstrate momentum in fulfilling a unique mission) and is distinct from the other universities that have been identified as being regional. Because of our success, we should not be looked at as part of the problem nor should we be looked at as part of the solution for other campuses.

WOU continues to do very well in attracting students and admitting students. Compared to last year, we have improved by over 14% in the number of students who have applied for admission at Western. Of those who have applied, we have had 33% who are admitted. We have also had tremendous success in increasing our Hispanic student applications by 36% and increasing our admissions by 65%. We have also had great success in retaining students transitioning from freshman to sophomore.

We have maximized revenue through our retention efforts, through additional recruitment of traditional students, through our new minority recruitment plan, and the continuing recruitment of international students.

Regarding program changes: Program changes should only be brought forward if there is a very clear and persuasive case that can be made regarding retention, recruitment, access, or minimizing expenses.

David McDonald gave a brief summary of yesterday's reading: The panel is aware that we are dealing with a $3 plus billion deficit in terms of the next biennium. The committee is looking for the university system to be part of the solution. Our failure to do so will empower them to make decisions on our behalf. It will be necessary to consider what is best for students.

Mark Weiss also stated: On February 19th, the governor announced furloughs, salary freezes, and some salary rollbacks for state government, Chancellor's office, and the offices of the university presidents. This will be discussed at the next board meeting.
The expected financial impact is a $9 million reduction this year for OUS--$443,000 of that is directly attributable to Western. Consequently, we reduced our appropriation by $443,000. With the additional reduction of about $800 million of revenue shortfall this year, the Oregon university system is being asked to take another $37 million reduction, translating to approximately $1.8 million for WOU. Our expected fund balance for the end of this year is about 12%. We expect the reductions for next biennium to be $4 million per year--that represents 20 % less than the funding level we got from the state in the 07-09 biennium and approx 30% below what we consider to be our essential budget level.

We're in the process now of beginning to put together our next year's budget. We expect our enrollment to remain even. We think a 7% to 9% increase in tuition for the new cohort of students entering the university next year may be necessary. We will have an increase in remission levels. A salary freeze will likely be essential for the next biennium, as will some reduction in S and S budgets.

Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU, Max Beach's Report
No report

Provost Kent Neely's Report
No report. Provosts' Council will meet next week.

IV. Old Business

Request to establish 800 course numbers: JoNan LeRoy Director for DEP

It was proposed that WOU define 800 Professional Development numbers.

Action: Senate unanimously approved to endorse the establishment of 800-level Professional Development course numbers.


Graduate Studies: Linda Stonecipher, Director of Graduate Studies

Proposed: a conditional admission proposal for graduate language requirement. The main intent of this policy is to create an educational environment that emphasizes English language development that will provide international students with the necessary foundation for graduate-level coursework.

Changes to the proposal:
Page 2, Policy Log;
IELTS log will be 6.0 rather than 6.5;
Page 3 part C "During the year of conditional admission" is changed to "During conditional admission";
Page 3 part C #2, "receive at least a B- on all coursework" will be made more explicit by indicating that "all coursework" means "each course"

Action: Senate unanimously approved the proposal with the corrections as noted.

Military Science: Colonel Susuico

Proposal for MS 118 designated as an LACC class.

Action: Senate unanimously agreed to table action on this proposal until the March 10th meeting.

Revised Sports Leadership Minor: Marita Cardinal

Three changes are proposed:

1) Change in language for the elective course options from: "Choose three credits
total from coaching classes and /or practicum" to "Choose six credits of sport- or
coaching-related courses and/or coaching practicum, with advisor approval."

2) Increase the credit hours from 2 to 3 for PE 361.

3) Add PE 420: Motor Learning for Coaches as an alternative to Regular Motor Learning.

Action: Senate unanimously approved the proposed Sports Leadership Minor changes.

Theater Arts: Michael Philips

Proposed: a number of small curricular changes and corrections to theater degree programs. Additional classes are added to fill curricular holes and to better align the program with the National Association of Schools of Theater (NAST). Changes do not alter the total number of required credits for each degree.

Action: Senate unanimously approved the Theater Arts proposed changes.

Graphic Design: Diane Tarter

Proposed title changes for some of the existing courses and three new courses. The
three added courses (Digital Design A423, A424, A425) will run parallel to the
Print Design sequence. The new courses provide more options for graphic design
students. Students may choose to take one or both of the 400 level sequences after
completing all prerequisites in art foundations, introductory 200 level courses, and
the 300 level year-long sequence. This flexible choice option fits within the 84
credits required in the art major. This addition is proposed in order to align WOU's
art program with current practices and university offerings in the state, our region,
and the nation.

Action: Senate unanimously approved the proposed changes to the Graphic Design program.


Music: Joe Harchenko

New course proposal: MUS 404 Junior Seminar. In order for us to be more in line with other institutions, a zero credit-hour requirement that would be passed upon successful completion of the capstone project.

Action: Senate unanimously approved the new course proposal.

V. New Business

No new business

VI. Additional Reports and Items

Office of Institutional Research and Sponsored Projects (OIRSP) report

Action: Senate agreed to table this report and discussion until our March meeting.

VII. Meeting Adjourned

5:00

Senate Minutes 2-24-09

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Minutes 26 May 2009

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Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, May 26th, 2009 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center


I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Mark Girod, Scott Beaver, Susan Daniel, David Doellinger, Marie Lejeune for Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, Camila Gabaldon, Robert Hautala, Shaun Huston, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Roy Bennett, Elisa Maroney, John Minahan, Kent Neely, Katherine Schmidt, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite, Peggy Pedersen, Pete Poston, Solveig Holmquist, Joe Harchanko, Mark Van Steeter, Curt Yehnert

II. Corrections and approval of minutes from May 12th, 2009 meeting

Action: Minutes approved with minor corrections.

III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President Report: Mark Girod

1. New deadline for submitting curriculum changes will be distributed to faculty via email.

2. Executive committee redrafted the WOU diversity statement.

3. A couple of small curriculum changes will be passed on to the new Senate.

4. Please encourage participation in Academic Excellence Day.


University President Report: President Minahan

We leave the year with our enrollment being up 13% and actual admission up over 17% from last year.

We recently held an athletic auction. Although our donor gifts are about one half of what they were the previous year, we're up about $7000 for a net of $23,000 for scholarships for athletics. We cut a lot of our expenses which increased our net in scholarships.

Our 9% proposed tuition increase has gone over fairly well in the legislature. Given that this increase is only for freshmen, the average increase to the student body is less than 3%.

Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU President, Max Beach's Report:
No report

Provost Kent Neely's Report

No Provost Council meeting to report. The next report will be given at the July 14th meeting.


IV. Old Business

General Education Mission Statement and Learning Outcomes: Shaun Huston

Shaun Huston shared the revised Gen. Ed. Mission Statement and Learning Outcomes Document.

Action: Unanimously agreed to accept the Western Oregon University General Education Mission Statement and Learning Outcomes as written.


Review of Interdisciplinary College Study (ICS) courses

Mark Girod reviewed the intent of the ICS review, the ICS course review process, and the ARC recommendations. Provost Neely, after conversations with Nancy France, Niki Young, and Karin Sullivan-Vance regarding the course review process, determined that the proposed process seems achievable.

Action: Senate approved (with one member in opposition) the ARC recommendations with the exception of grandfathering in any courses. All courses are to go through curriculum review.


V. New Business

Senate Elections

Elections were held for Senate positions. Elected were:

Senate President: Katherine Schmidt
Vice President: Scott Beaver
Secretary: Camila Gabaldon
Members at Large for the Executive Committee: Jason Waite, Cheryl Davis

Committee on Committee membership:

The following members agreed to sit on the Committee on Committees:
Klay Kruczek, Mark Girod, Scott Beaver, Dana Ulveland, Robert Hautala

Action: Senate unanimously agreed to accept membership as outlined.


Revised Statement on Diversity: Mark Girod

Mark Girod shared the Executive Committee's work on the Western Oregon University Diversity Statement.

Action: Unanimously agreed to accept the proposed WOU Commitment to Diversity Statement.

Faculty Senate Awards Committee: Bryan Dutton

Bryan Dutton shared the Committee on Committee's Revised Recommendations for the Faculty Senate Awards Committee.

Action: It was unanimously agreed to approve the Committee on Committee recommendations for the Faculty Senate Awards Committee.


VI Additional Reports and Items

No additional reports.


VII. Meeting Adjourned

5:02

Minutes 12 May 2009

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Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, May 12th, 2009 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center


I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Mark Girod, Scott Beaver, Susan Daniel, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, Scott Grim, Robert Hautala, Sandy Hedgepeth, Henry Hughes, Shaun Huston, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Roy Bennett, Elisa Maroney, Mark Weiss for John Minahan, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Katherine Schmidt, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite, Peggy Pedersen, Solveig Holmquist, Joe Harchanko, Mark Van Steeter

II. Corrections and approval of minutes from April 28th, 2009 meeting

Action: Minutes approved with minor correction.

III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President Report: Mark Girod

1. The '09-'10 deadline for curriculum proposals is earlier than this year. An email will be sent out confirming new dates.

2. Please ensure new senators are elected and that they attend the next meeting.

3. Writing 230 was approved in executive session.

4. Tina Fuchs, Dean of Students, is looking for a few good citizens to serve on the University Students Conduct Committee. Please forward the names of any interested and eligible candidates to Tina.


University President Report: Mark Weiss for President Minahan

The Chancellor asked that the Presidents of the seven institutions collaborate on a response to the proposed budget as articulated by the Ways and Means Committee co-chairs. The purpose of this response is to help the committee understand what the proposed budget cuts would mean for Oregon higher education. The projected OUS biennium reduction is proposed to be $129 million of the total appropriation. State appropriations supporting the Chancellor's Office operations will be decreased by 25% below the essential budget level

Items of note:

• that tuition increases greater than 3.6 per year per resident undergraduate would require a 30% set-aside at a difference above a 3.6% increase for need-based financial aid.

• that the system as a whole would reduce salaries and associated benefits by 4.6% from current levels for a system-wide savings of almost $5 million.

• that tuition increases at larger campuses would be about 9% and in no case will be above 10%.

• that increases at smaller campuses, excluding WOU, will average 6% per year. Because of our tuition promise, we will not raise tuition for students in the 'Promise Program.' We will increase tuition for new students entering this year's cohort by 9%.

• that around the system employee position elimination would be about 100 FTE and State Public Service Employees will be about 55 employees with an additional 50 FTE on federal grants that are leveraged with State funds.


Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU President, Max Beach's Report:
No report

Provost Kent Neely's Report

Eastern Oregon University, suffering a fairly serious decline in enrollment, is currently being urged by businesses and local citizens to provide workforce training and re-training initiatives. The university has sought to revive two associates degrees--an AA in Education and an AS in Management.

A number of programs that were in the pipeline prior to the 'moratorium on programs' are being considered by a number of institutions.

The Vice Chancellor for Strategic Planning made a presentation of a compilation of all institutions and presented as a 'Performance Measures Report'--a cumulative gathering of information about how pre-set measures are being met by each of the seven institutions. This report can be accessd at : www.ous.edu/factreport/mp/files/2009%20OUS%20Performance%20Report.pdf


IV. Old Business

Policy on Children in the Classroom

Senators were given the opportunity to voice any concerns raised by faculty as to the content or design of the Policy.

Action: Unanimously agreed to approve the Children in the Classroom Policy as written.


Statement on Diversity

Senators shared any pertinent feedback received from divisions.

Action: Unanimously agreed that Executive Committee would integrate the suggestions that have been submitted and craft an edited version of the statement to be brought back to faculty senate for final approval on May 26th.


V. New Business

Review of ICS Courses: David MacDonald

It was requested that the 'elective-only' ICS courses be involved in a formal review process. This review process would run parallel to the other university course reviews. The purpose would be to tighten policies and procedures around course offerings.

Mark Henkels spoke to the ARC review of the ICS proposal. The IRC provided a number of recommendations. The desire for course assessment was supported.

Committee on Committees: Bryan Dutton

'D' Designation Recommendation

The Committee on Committees considered the request to create a Diversity Committee that would be responsible for evaluating and approving 'D' designation course proposals. The committee recommended that a taskforce be charged with revisiting the criteria for 'D' courses and ultimately establish an evaluation rubric to be used by the Curriculum Committee. The taskforce should be composed of two faculty members from each college along with a representative from the Curriculum Committee.

Action: It was unanimously approved to move ahead with the Committee on Committee's recommendations with the amendment to have a continuing Curriculum Committee representative serve on the committee to provide continuity.

Faculty Senate Awards Committee

After reviewing the guidelines regarding committee membership on the Faculty Senate Awards Committee, it was suggested that the benefactor's instructions regarding committee membership would be helpful.

Action: It was unanimously agreed that the Faculty Senate Awards Committee recommendations be returned to the Committee on Committees to consider : 1) incorporating Library Media Services membership; 2) having rotating membership on the committee to provide continuity; and 3) to address working with the Provost's Office to host an awards ceremony.


VI Additional Reports and Items

At-large elections for Nominating Committee

Action: Roy Bennett and Sue Dauer were elected for the Nominating Committee


VII. Meeting Adjourned

5:00

Minutes 28 March 2009

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Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, April 28th, 2009 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center


I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Mark Girod, Scott Beaver, Susan Daniel, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, Robert Hautala, Michael Phillips for Sandy Hedgepeth, Shaun Huston, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Roy Bennet, Elisa Maroney, John Minahan, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite, Peggy Pedersen, Joe Harchanko, Katherine Schmidt, Mark Van Steeter, Curt Yehnert

II. Corrections and approval of minutes from April 14th, 2009 meeting
Action: Minutes approved.

III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President Report: Mark Girod

Senate Executive Committee referred a number of items to subcommittees: the Committee on Committees has reviewed the 'D' designation report and will be bringing the outcomes of the review to the next Executive Committee meeting; AIC will deliver a report of the traditional wish list for the next biennium; the New Faculty Awards Committee is now fully formed and working on the two Pastega Awards.

Senate election procedures were shared and senators were asked that new division senators be elected and that current and new senators attend the next two senate meetings.

President John Minahan's report:

The Focus North West visit will take place April 29th. The evaluator will look to see that our university has made assessment part of our culture and that we have made advancements since last year.

Professor Wiengard, visiting professor, with an expertise in learning and teacher education will be staying in the President's house for a couple of months.

A workshop will be put together that will inform faculty and staff about email use.

Our Spring term student numbers have increase by 440 students over last year at this time. We currently have over 5100 students enrolled this term.

Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU President, Max Beach's Report:

ASWOU will be having campaigns and holding elections next week.
We are also participating in a picture taking campaign that will be going state-wide.
Student pictures and stories will be shared with the legislature.
An ASWOU news letter will be going out to students and faculty.
Twenty students showed up for the Ways and Means Roadshow.



Provost Kent Neely's Report

No Provost's Council Meeting was held last week. A report will be given at the next Senate meeting.

IV. Old Business

Math: Klay Kruczek

In an attempt to assist math education minor students pass the Middle School Mathematics Praxis Exam, the Math department proposed requiring MTH 392 or MTH 111, MTH 494 and MTH 495 in the Mathematics Education Minor.

Action: Senate unanimously agreed to pass the changes in the Mathematics Education Minor.

Music: Joe Harchanko

Students feel as though they would be better prepared for the full sequence of doing a senior capstone project if they have had an experience at the junior level. In order to make that possible, it was proposed to withdraw an upper level elective and substitute the junior seminar to permit a junior recital.

It was also propose that the Bachelor of Music, with an emphasis in music theatre, will be require to take Ethnomusicology. We would also be eliminating the instrumental portion 154/354 sequence.

Action: Senate unanimously agreed to pass the Music proposal.

German Studies: Curt Yehnert

German Studies proposed increasing the credit amount for courses German 199, German 399, and German 499 from 1-3 credits to 1-6 credits to facilitate students' ability to travel abroad.

Action: Senate unanimously agreed to pass the Music proposal.


Political Science: Ed Dover

The Political Science Department proposed the addition of a concentration area (Public Policy and Administration) due to strong student requests, the evolution of WOU's faculty and their interests, and the growth of health policy and administration as a career option. This change does not require any new faculty or resources.

Action: Senate unanimously agreed to accept the Political Science Department's request to add a new concentration area (Public Policy and Administration).



V. New Business

WOU Policy regarding children in the classroom: Provost Neely

Provost Neely shared with Senate a copy of the revised "WOU Policy regarding children in the classroom."


WOU Commitment to Diversity: Provost Neely

Provost Neely shared with Senate the statement of WOU's Commitment to Diversity. Senate members were asked to take this statement back to respective divisions and elicit feedback from faculty. Feedback should be sent to Mark Girod.

VI. Meeting Adjourned

5:00

Minutes 14 April 2009

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Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, April 14th, 2009 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center


I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Mark Girod, Scott Beaver, Susan Daniel, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, David Foster, Robert Hautala, Sandy Hedgepeth, Shaun Huston, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Shirley Lincicum for Roy Bennett, Elisa Maroney, John Minahan, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite, Peggy Pedersen, Solveig Holmquist for Joe Harchanko, Mark Van Steeter, Curt Yehnert

II. Corrections and approval of minutes from March 10th, 2009 meeting
Action: Minutes approved.

III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President Report: Mark Girod

The following curriculum actions were taken in Senate Executive Committee on 4/8/09

Deleted Courses:


PSY 498/598
PSY 440/540
PSY 471/571
PSY 472/572
PSY 496/596
PSY 649
PSY 632
PSY 627
PSY 624
PSY 623
PSY 619

New Courses:

ED 240 Young Adult Literature
ED 230 Children's Literature in the Classroom
MS 118 Military Physical Conditioning

Please ensure that your division has elected new senators for 09/10 and ask that old and new senators attend both May meetings so that all are available for Senate office elections.

After an incident whereby a student announced that she was bringing her children to class with her, Provost Neely looked into the state of the policy that speaks to having children attend classes. This policy was subsequently examined by an OUS lawyer and the policy language was tightened up. The policy was examined by the Senate Executive Committee and the issues raised earlier by the committee have been adequately addressed.

Elisa Maroney shared with the Senate that Senate President Mark Girod has been newly appointed Chair of the Division of Teacher Education. The Executive Committee did not see any reason that Mark should not fulfill his role as Senate President. The floor was opened to allow Senators to voice any concerns over this issue. Given that no concerns were voiced, Elisa offered to take any concerns received via email and share those concerns with the Senate Executive Committee.


President John Minahan's report:

President Minahan has been preparing for the Ways and Means Budget Review for the Oregon University System.

The Joint Ways and Means Committee will go on the road to receive testimony around the state to talk about the impact of a 30% reduction in budget on local communities with the idea that the impact will be so severe the people will want to see a tax increase.

President Minahan and Paul Mordock have been having conversations regarding our 25000 person alumni base. Currently those who contribute to the University is about 6%. That means we have about 1500 alumni from the 25000 that actually give money to the university. That works out to be approximately $133.00 per donor. A hundred or less donors account for the majority of the money contributed to the university. We have received over one million dollars this year--that is up from last year's $778,000. Because we are not connecting very well to our broad alumni base we are looking at segmenting the alumni group and start addressing specific groups. We will be meeting with division chairs and deans and other university administrative staff to look for strategies that might lead to better access to our alumni base.


Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU President, Max Beach's Report:
No report

Provost Kent Neely's Report

Provost Neely shared the Faculty Engagement Survey 'Invitation to Participate' document. This Invitation describes the purposes for the survey as well as the benefits that might be derived from having faculty participate in the survey.

Provost's Council Meeting

The Higher Education Board approved new admission, enrollment, and tuition approaches to increase student participation in college and manage costs. Additional information can be found at http://www.ous.edu/news_and_information/news/040309.php

Proposed policies regarding undergraduate program demand and minimum class size were presented for the 2009-11 biennium. The Provosts' Council will annually review the number of bachelor's degrees awarded for those awarding fewer than 5 degrees along with enrollment trends for the past 5 years and report to the Board. No undergraduate lecture course enrolling fewer than 10 students will be scheduled unless there is a compelling educational reason that will be determined by the institution's president and provost/chief academic officer. Some courses will be excluded from consideration due to prevailing pedagogy and the nature of the course or program.

A tuition task force established guidelines in terms of tuition. These guidelines state: no student should be deterred from enrolling in college due to tuition costs; need-based aid should increase with tuition rates so as not to impede student access; non-resident students should pay a larger share of instructional costs when marketing conditions permit; and tuition pricing should be moderate and predictable in order to protect quality; and, financial liability must be maintained by balancing the principles of access, affordability and quality.

IV. Old Business

General Education Curriculum Review Committee:

Shaun Huston shared the proposed Draft of the "Western Oregon University General Education Mission Statement and Learning Outcomes." Some suggestions for changes were provided. Shaun asked that other divisions suggest any other changes to the learning outcomes as soon as possible.

Action: Senate unanimously agreed that revisions go back to the ad hoc committee for further consideration and wordsmithing.


Political Science:

Action: Senate unanimously approved PS 204 as an LACC designated course.

Action: The Political Science Department's request to: 1) add a concentration area (Public Policy and Administration) and, 2) propose three new classes (PS 432 Global Health, PS 441 Causes of Peace, and PS 459 Government and Politics of Latin America) was tabled until the next meeting.

Humanities:

Carol Harding reviewed the Humanities program changes that included tightening up the requirements for the Humanities.

Action: Senate unanimously approved the Humanities program changes as outlined.

International Studies:

Robin Smith reviewed the proposal to: 1) change Com 325 Intercultural Communication to PS 204 Comparative Politics; 2) the addition of 9 regional courses and 11 topical courses (all newly additional courses); and, 3) addition of new catalogue language.

Action: Senate unanimously agreed to accept the proposed changes.

Anthropology:

Robin Smith reviewed the proposal to add a new non-thesis track B.A or B.S. in Anthropology (still 64 hour); and, change the thesis track to B.A. only.

Action: Senate unanimously agreed to accept: 1) the Anthropology's institution of a non-thesis track B.A or B.S. in Anthropology; and, 2) to restrict the thesis track to B.A. only.

Action: Senate agreed (with one opposition and two abstentions) to refer the Anthropology's proposal--to award the thesis BA in Anthropology with Departmental Honors to students earning 3.25 overall and 3.5 in the major and have this designation recorded on the transcript and diploma--to the Academic Requirements Committee.

Political Science:

Action: Senate unanimously approved the new courses PS 441 Causes of Peace, and PS 459 Government and Politics of Latin America and tabled consideration of PS 332 Global Health until members from Political Science and Health meet to work out content and name issues.

Action: Senate unanimously agreed to table the Political Science Department's request to add of a new concentration area (Public Policy and Administration).


V. New Business

D Proposals: Laurie Burton

Laurie recommended creating a Diversity Committee similar to the WI committee. This new committee, unlike the Curriculum Committee, would have time to carefully analyze D proposals in a manner similar to the analysis of Q and WI proposals. The first order of Business for a Diversity Committee would be to update the D forms. The current forms are outdated, unclear and vague. It was suggested that the Committee on Committees review this proposal in an expedited manner.


Math: Laurie Burton

In an attempt to assist math education minor students in passing the Middle School Mathematics Praxis Exam, the Math department is proposing requiring MTH 392 or MTH 111, MTH 494 and MTH 495 in the Mathematics Education Minor.

Music: Solveig Holmquist

Students feel as though they would be better prepared for the full sequence of doing a senior capstone project if they have had an experience at the junior level. In order to make that possible, it is being proposed to withdraw an upper level elective and substituting the junior seminar to permit a junior recital.


German Studies: Carol Harding

German Studies is proposing increasing the credit amount for courses German 199, German 399, and German 499 from 1-3 credits to 1-6 credits to facilitate students ability to travel abroad.


VII. Meeting Adjourned

5:00

Minutes 10 March 2009

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Faculty Senate Minutes Western Oregon University Tuesday, March 10th, 2009 @ 3:30 Columbia Room, Werner University Center
I. Call to order and roll call 3:30
In Attendance: Scott Beaver, Roy Bennett, Mark Perlman for Susan Daniel, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, David Foster, Sandy Hedgepeth, Shaun Huston, Klay Kruczek, Elisa Maroney, John Minahan, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Joe Peng, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite, Peggy Pedersen, Katherine Schmidt, Joe Harchenko, Mark Van Steeter, Kurt Yehnert

II. Corrections and approval of minutes from February 24th, 2009 meeting
Action: Minutes approved with minor corrections.

III. Reports of the presidents
Faculty Senate President Report: Elisa Maroney for Mark Girod
The following curriculum actions were taken in Senate Executive Committee on
3/4/09 - information provided after the 3/10/09 meeting
Added D designation to an existing course:
Anth 435D/535
Change in prerequisites:
Mth 489/589 Mth 494/594 Mth 398
Mth 491/591 Mth 495/595 Mth 395
Mth 493/593 Mth 497/597 Mth 391
New courses:

Anth 452C U.S.-Mexico Border Field School Anth 432D Human Rights Anth 413 Field Experience Anth 395D Medical Anthropology Anth 381D African Film and Society Anth 373 Primate Comparative Evolution PS 459D Government and Politics of South America PS 441D Causes of Peace PS 432D Global Health
Also approved generic 807 and 808 course numbers for use in DEP as per
discussion in senate on 2/24/09
Title changes: Deleted courses:
Ed 672 Anth 365
Ed 452 Anth 340
Fr 410 SpEd 607

Approved catalog changes describing programs for:
Early Intervention/Special Education I & II
Master of Science in Education: Special Education

President John Minahan's report:
Compared to the rest of the OUS system, Western is in very good shape with a 38% increase in admitted students and an 8.6% increase in applications. Comparatively, Eastern and Southern are down significantly. We have a very strong showing from minority students and Latino students. At this point we are down in out-of-state
U.S. students. In addition, we are down 1.5 % in bed reservations for the residence hall but this is in contrast to unusually high numbers last year.
At this point, Senate Bill 442 references to mergers are out. The conversations now in place revolve around other perceived cost-cutting measures, such as converting the entire university system to the semester calendar. We are also being asked to look at combining all enrollment management functions into one office on each campus which we have already essentially done. We will submit a report of those two findings by October, 2010.
There are a number of changes to the bill that make a difference to us: we would keep the interest on all tuition and revenues gained; there is consideration of a standard application form and process for everybody in the system; articulation agreements between community colleges and pubic and private schools; a single electronic imaging and storage for documents using standardized management programs (budget and personnel standardized) for financial aid; and, standardized classroom schedules.
There is talk that Southern will tie in with the university of Oregon so that students can automatically get accepted into U of O after two years at Southern.
We are supposed to be reviewing our mission statements and submit any changes in our mission no later than July 1, 2010.
Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report
ASWOU President, Max Beach's Report: Max Beach thanked those faculty members who allowed ASWOU into classrooms to promote the postcard collection campaign. ASWOU collected 514 postcards to take to the capital. In addition, members of ASWOU have been working to get free wireless Internet access here on campus for students and faculty. Finally, there has been some discussion regarding working with faculty to develop events (such as lobbying) over at the capital of the course of next term.
Provost Kent Neely's Report Provost Neely shared a March 6th Oregon University System News Release entitled: Higher Ed Board Discusses Immediate, Future Budget Cuts and Serious Impacts for Oregon Public Universities. Much of the provosts' council meeting dealt with financial matters. Of interest was the UO and SOU fund balances, voluntary work reduction (voluntary FTE reduction to OUS employees in senior positions that could save the OUS approximately 4.6%); cost saving measures such as system-wide common acceptance system; shared services; a more differentiated tuition system; changes in rules involving low enrollment courses; quarter to semester plans; and a look at different class and course structures.
Provost's Council has placed a moratorium on advancing new program proposals to the OUS board for consideration until the current budget situation is more clearly defined.
Provost's Council has a subgroup working on a policy regarding what classes or courses will be affected by a minimal enrollment expectation (10 students or more). Given that some courses are typically low in numbers due to the nature of the course, the subgroup will be looking at special considerations that need to be given to adhere to the expectations.

III. Additional Reports and Items:
Office of Institutional Research and Sponsored Projects (OIRSP) Presentation
Ella Taylor shared information on a number of OIRSP mandates as well as responding to questions posed by faculty senate over the course of last week. Covered by Ella Taylor were: types of assistance provided by SP; SP functions; regulations governing sponsored projects; and, examples of university resources. More information, including proposal information and forms can be accessed at the Sponsored Projects website (http://www.wou.edu/provost/oirsp/sponsored.php). Given that grants are of varying magnitudes and complexities, and in need of various levels of assistance, those with questions on any grant specific, or how individual grants might best be handled are urged to contact the OIRSP for clarification and assistance.

IV. Old Business
None

V. New Business
General Education Curriculum Review Committee - proposed outcomes: Shaun Huston Shaun Huston provided a draft of the committee's proposed learning outcomes. The 19¬member committee relegated the determination of outcomes to a smaller group of four members who were able to establish trans-disciplinary outcomes that focused on action (what students would presumably be able to do as a result of going through this curriculum). It was requested that this proposal be taken back to divisions for review. The next step will be to identify specific courses that student learning might be assessed in regards to the proposed learning outcomes.
Political Science: Ed Dover The Political Science Department would like to request three changes: 1) the addition of a concentration area (Public Policy and Administration) due to strong student requests, the evolution of WOU's faculty and their interests, and the growth of health policy and administration as a career option. This change does not require any new faculty or resources; 2) a proposal for three new classes (PS 332 Global Health, PS 441 Causes of Peace, and PS 459 Government and Politics of Latin America); and, 3) the addition of PS 204 Introduction to Comparative Politics.
Humanities: Carol Harding A proposal for a catalogue revision that better structures how students would be advised to fulfill a major in Humanities. The new catalogue language lists two blocks of classes helping to eliminate some of the seeming randomness in the current catalogue descriptions.
International Studies: Robin Smith It is proposed to: 1) change Com 325 Intercultural Communication to PS 204 Comparative Politics; 2) the addition of 9 regional courses and 11 topical courses (all newly additional courses); and, 3) addition of new catalogue language.
Anthropology: Robin Smith Proposed is a new non-thesis track B.A or B.S. in Anthropology (still 64 hour); and, a new thesis track B.A. only. In addition to this, the Anthropology department requests authorization to award the thesis BA in Anthropology with Departmental Honors to students earning 3.25 overall and 3.5 in the major and have this designation recorded on the transcript and diploma.

VII. Meeting Adjourned
5:00

Minutes 11-25-08

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Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, November 25th, 2008 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center



I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Scott Beaver, Roy Bennett, Susan Daniel, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, Kathy Farrell, David Foster, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Shaun Huston, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Elisa Maroney, Mark Weiss for John Minahan, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Joe Peng, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite


II. Corrections and approval of minutes from November 11th, 2008 meeting
Action: Minutes approved.


III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President, Mark Girod's Report

In executive meeting:

1. Executive approved University Computing Services' web-editing support for faculty senate on an ongoing, "as needed," basis. Faculty Senate will pay $500.00 annually for this support. Requests to edit web pages and/or post files will occur within 72 hours. Either the Director of UCS or Faculty Senate Executive Committee can terminate this agreement at any time providing at least one academic quarter notice.

2. Please forward names of division representatives who will sit on Faculty Senate Awards Selection Committee to Bryan Dutton after Dec. 2nd division meetings.

3. Please recruit for Hispanic Committee Advisory Council. These names should be forwarded to David McDonald.


Mark Weiss' Report (for President John Minahan)

During last week's regularly scheduled Budget and Finance Committee meeting,
information was shared regarding the finances of the university. University's finances are strong, but given the current climate, there may be some clouds on the horizon.

The November 19th revenue forecast for this biennium and next biennium was adjusted--$170 million down for this biennium and an additional $750 million for next biennium.

Oregon University System was asked last week to take $10 million out of its state appropriation. A pro-rata amount for Western Oregon University would be roughly $500,000 representing about 5% of our appropriation for the last six months of the year, or about 1.2% of appropriation for the entire biennium. President Minahan was asked by the Chancellor's Office to state what actions we would take as a result of that reduction. We would reduce fund balance and take advantage of selective vacancies by not filling those positions and, where reasonable, cut back on some S&S costs. Raising tuition would be a last resort. We anticipate, however, ending up the year on target with a fund balance of approximately 15%.


Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU, Max Beach's Report
No report


Provost Kent Neely's Report

Provost Neely reported on wireless Internet access. Regular office Internet access per faculty member is $12.00 a month. Wireless access would be an additions $5.00 a month--$17.00 a month for both, or $204.00 for the academic year to provide faculty members with both office and wireless service.

We will provide wireless Internet access to any faculty member who needs it in order to provide their regular job-related duties. Service can be acquired, beginning the 2nd of February. This will allow sufficient time for the appropriate security devices to be put into the system. Those wishing wireless access will make requests through Division Head and Dean. Deans will fund the access out of their own budgets until the end of the fiscal year, at which time it will be decided whether S&S budgets need to be augmented to accommodate the wireless costs.


IV. Old Business

Academic Excellence Showcase:
The Academic Excellence Committee asked for Senate support that would be demonstrated though the endorsement of a university-wide letter. Executive Committee reviewed the Academic Excellence Showcase letter and endorsed the letter.

Action: Unanimously agreed that Senate would lend full support to the Academic Showcase Letter.

Restructuring of Gen Ed Committee:

Action: Unanimously agreed that Provost Neely would be added to the Gen Ed Committee as an Ex Officio Member.


V. New Business

Graduate School Policy Consideration:

Linda Stonecipher, Director of Graduate Studies, presented two documents regarding Reduced Enrollment Policy. The reduced enrollment policy will allow international students to enroll for a maximum of four terms of thesis, professional project or comprehensive exam work. This allows international students to take fewer than 9 credits in their final term and still comply with immigration regulations of maintaining full time enrollment through their program of study. This allows students to work on graduation requirements without having to register for unnecessary coursework or attempting to complete degrees with unreasonable deadlines.


VI. Additional Reports and Items

General Education Review Committee: Shaun Huston

Shaun Huston reported on the faculty survey that was designed last year and administered earlier this term. There were 109 total responses to the survey. The survey gave the committee a snapshot of faculty views of what students ought to be learning, and how well they are learning those things. The committee will provide survey data summary reports to Senate. Given a concern regarding confidentiality of data, username and password will not be broadcasted nor will the database username and password be provided to people to simply to look at the data in the survey. Huston will talk with Ella Taylor about removing the survey from Survey Monkey and archive the data on another less-accessible medium.

Western Oregon University doesn't have outcomes for general education right now. We have the statement of institutional aspirations for learning and a short set of outcomes for LACC specifically, but not for the Gen Ed Program more broadly. This suggests that a next step for the committee will be to look closely at developing general education outcomes. A subcommittee will be developed and then report back to the full committee with recommendations for outcomes.

International Education and Services Committee report: Doug Smith

Doug Smith reported on the assessment of WOU's progress in supporting international students. Challenges: 1) discrepancy has emerged as to indicators of student preparations and successful integration into academic program; 2) we still have much work to do improving communication across university units. The committee determined areas of focus and a number of recommendations were given. Recommendations included: A greater number of international students could make use of the writing center. The Intensive English Program should exist in a stronger structural relationship with other academic units; advising needs to be improved; students should be assigned a faculty advisor upon arrival to the campus; faculty workshops should be developed to assist faculty in dealing with international students. In the immediate future: the committee intends to survey faculty on their experience teaching and advising international students; the committee will find out what students themselves say about their experience at WOU; the committee will find ways of enhancing measures already in place during international student orientation.

International Education and Services Committee would like Faculty Senate to support the work and recommendations made by the committee.

Before doing so, and prior to sending this report out to the campus community, Senate will review the report once again at the January 13th Faculty Senate Meeting. Faculty Senate and will invite ISSA Director Neng Yang to share the ISSA perspectives on the report.


VII. Meeting Adjourned
5:05


4


approved_senate_minutes_11-25-08.doc

Minutes 10 February 2009

| No Comments

Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, February 10th, 2009 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center

I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Max Beach, Scott Beaver, Sue Dauer, Bryan Dutton, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Shaun Huston, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Elisa Maroney, John Minahan, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Joe Peng, Dana Ulveland, Curt Yehnert, Katherine Schmidt, Mark Van Steeter, Peggy Pedersen, Sandy Hedgepeth, Joe Harchenko, Jason Waite

II. Corrections and approval of minutes from January 27th, 2009 meeting
Action: Minutes approved with minor corrections.

III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President, Mark Girod's Report

Minor curricular changes approved in senate executive session:


SpEd 607
SpEd 609
SpEd 610
SpEd 620
SpEd 625
SpEd 628
SpEd 639
SpEd 671
SpEd 682
SpEd 4/509
SpEd 4/586
SpEd 4/587
SpEd 4/588
SpEd 4/589
SpEd 4/590
ASL 406
ASL 407
ASL 408
ASL 409

Title Changes


PS 492
PS 497
PE 203
PE 121

Prerequisite Changes


ENT 320
GEOG 207
PE 371
PE 473
PE 483

Title and description changes:

MS 405

Minor Program Changes:

Special Education/Rehabilitation Counseling minor: shuffled courses around in the minor, no new courses, edits to wording in catalog.
President John Minahan's report:

As things continue to get worse in the state financially, pressure continues to build on the Oregon University to make cuts and to plan for reductions. Our revenue stands strong. We are up about 35% in undergraduate admits. At this point we have 1149 undergraduates admitted, as compared to 848 last year. At this point we are working very hard to maximize our enrollment and maximize our tuition revenues the best we can to stay away from some of the difficulties that are likely to come our way.

Mark Weiss then spoke to the basic budget strategy. The likely worst case scenario as it relates to the Oregon University System, and Western in particular, is about 20% reductions in state appropriations. That amounts to about $400 million per year for each of the next two years. We are in the process of developing a plan that has two major goals: 1) having our students succeed here at Western; 2) to preserve employment to those people around the university. We will know more after the State economist makes a revenue forecast on February 20th.

We currently have $50 million to spend on our new residence hall and the Health and Wellness Center.

We project no reduction in personnel to the end of the year. We anticipate being more selective in replacing positions that become vacant or approving any new positions. Our goal for the rest of this year, and going into the next biennium is to avoid lay-offs.

We will probably give about a million and a half dollars back to the state. This would come out of our fund balance.

Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU, Max Beach's Report

Last week we had our Green Week--our annual Energy Sustainable Practices event that we hold on campus. Students pledged to change their practices toward more sustainable practices.

Our student fee committee has proposed a $9.00 fee increase. Open hearings will be held tonight and tomorrow evening. Final decisions will be made next week.

ASWOU and the Oregon Student Association are working in the legislature with five priorities: tuition and funding; need-based aid; student parent child-care; tuition equity and some anti-bullying legislation for k-12.

We have a lobby day on the 26th of February.
Provost Kent Neely's Report

OUS Board and Provost Council met here last Thursday. The majority of the meeting time was taken up by the Chancellor's report. He expressed concern about the current biennium and the ability to meet required budgetary commitments through the end of the fiscal year, 30 June. The legislature is working very hard trying to find solutions to the rapidly declining revenue for the state agencies and, consequently, OUS has been asked to look at a variety of measures meant to reduce expenses. The legislature is especially interested in low enrollment programs and lowered enrollment trends at regional campuses. Simultaneously, institutions are in the process of reviewing tuition rates and determining the best scenario for rates for the coming two years. We can expect that thresholds for class section minima to come under intense scrutiny for the fall and following terms.

The Chancellor has made it clear that this is not the time for new program requests even for justified requests. If something does go forward, we can expect a high level of scrutiny about demonstrating demand, revenue, expenses, and also the number of graduates that a program would produce.

A summary of the board meeting can be found at: http://www.ous.edu/news_and_information/news/020609.php

IV. Old Business

None

V. New Business

Request to establish 800 course numbers: JoNan LeRoy Director for DEP

It is proposed that WOU define 800 Professional Development numbers.

Request to establish 807 and 808 Professional Development courses: JoNan LeRoy

It is proposed to define 807 Professional Development Seminar and 808 Professional Development Workshop coursework.

807 and 808 Professional Development courses would be coordinated by DEP. 807 and 808 classes will not be published in the schedule of classes. The Registrar's Office would transcript Professional Development courses. This proposal also includes the stipulation that these specialized courses cannot be part of any WOU degree.


Graduate Studies: Linda Stonecipher, Director of Graduate Studies

Proposed: a conditional admission proposal for graduate language requirement. This proposal was approved by Faculty Senate Graduate Studies Committee on Jan. 20, 2009. The purpose of the Conditional Admission Policy for International Graduate Students is to provide students who have English skills that are slightly below admission requirements with the opportunity to take English language courses for a year in order to improve their language skills. The main intent of this policy is to create an educational environment that emphasizes English language development that will provide international students with the necessary foundation for graduate level coursework.


Military Science: Colonel Susuico

Proposal for MS 118 designated as an LACC class. Four year ROTC students are required to take PE 118 every single term. PE 118 is open to all students in Western. This proposal is to create a MS 118 course that is strictly for ROTC students. This way students will pay for, and receive credit for MS 118 rather than having students enroll in a couple of PE 118 classes and just show up for the other PE 118 classes. A maximum of 12 MS 118 credit hours would be taken over the four years.

Revised Sports Leadership Minor: Marita Cardinal

The current minor in Sports Leadership is in need of revision because of curricular and personnel changes that have occurred in the Division of Health and Physical Education over the past few years. Three changes are proposed:

1) Change in language for the elective course options from: "Choose three credits total from coaching classes and /or practicum" to "Choose six credits of sport- or coaching-related courses and/or coaching practicum, with advisor approval."

2) Increase the credit hours from 2 to 3 for PE 361

3) Add PE 420: Motor Learning for Coaches as an optional choice.


Theater Arts: Michael Philips

Michael Philips presented a number of small curricular changes and corrections to theater degree programs. Additional classes are added to fill curricular holes and to better align the program with the National Association of Schools of Theater (NAST). Changes do not alter the total number of required credits for each degree.


Graphic Design: Diane Tarter

Proposed title changes for some of the existing courses and three new courses. The three added courses (Digital Design A423, A424, A425) will run parallel to the Print Design sequence. The new courses provide more options for graphic design students. Students may choose to take one or both of the 400 level sequences after completing all prerequisites in art foundations, introductory 200 level courses, and the 300 level year-long sequence. This flexible choice option fits within the 84 credits required in the art major. This addition is proposed in order to align WOU's art program with current practices and university offerings in the state, our region, and the nation.

Music: Joe Harchenko

New course proposal: MUS 404- Junior Seminar. This is in response to students' requests that certain topics covered in the senior seminar would be more helpful covered in the junior year. We would be removing one elective from the degree.

 Currently music majors are required to do a capstone project, such as a senior recital. This is a critical component of our assessment and necessary for our NASM accreditation. Currently, we assign an incomplete to students in MUS 405 until they have completed their capstone project, which often must be scheduled in the term following MUS405 due to performance schedules and hall availability. Also, the work for the capstone project is really covered in the MUP sequence, or occasionally by other courses, and the grading for MUS 405 is not really related to the capstone project. In order for us to be more in line with other institutions, a zero-credit hour requirement that would be passed upon successful completion of the capstone project needs to be created.

VI. Additional Reports and Items

No additional reports and items

VII. Meeting Adjourned
4:45

Minutes 10 February 2009

| No Comments

Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, February 10th, 2009 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center

I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Max Beach, Scott Beaver, Sue Dauer, Bryan Dutton, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Shaun Huston, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Elisa Maroney, John Minahan, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Joe Peng, Dana Ulveland, Curt Yehnert, Katherine Schmidt, Mark Van Steeter, Peggy Pedersen, Sandy Hedgepeth, Joe Harchenko, Jason Waite

II. Corrections and approval of minutes from January 27th, 2009 meeting
Action: Minutes approved with minor corrections.

III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President, Mark Girod's Report

Minor curricular changes approved in senate executive session:


SpEd 607
SpEd 609
SpEd 610
SpEd 620
SpEd 625
SpEd 628
SpEd 639
SpEd 671
SpEd 682
SpEd 4/509
SpEd 4/586
SpEd 4/587
SpEd 4/588
SpEd 4/589
SpEd 4/590
ASL 406
ASL 407
ASL 408
ASL 409

Title Changes


PS 492
PS 497
PE 203
PE 121

Prerequisite Changes


ENT 320
GEOG 207
PE 371
PE 473
PE 483

Title and description changes:

MS 405

Minor Program Changes:

Special Education/Rehabilitation Counseling minor: shuffled courses around in the minor, no new courses, edits to wording in catalog.
President John Minahan's report:

As things continue to get worse in the state financially, pressure continues to build on the Oregon University to make cuts and to plan for reductions. Our revenue stands strong. We are up about 35% in undergraduate admits. At this point we have 1149 undergraduates admitted, as compared to 848 last year. At this point we are working very hard to maximize our enrollment and maximize our tuition revenues the best we can to stay away from some of the difficulties that are likely to come our way.

Mark Weiss then spoke to the basic budget strategy. The likely worst case scenario as it relates to the Oregon University System, and Western in particular, is about 20% reductions in state appropriations. That amounts to about $400 million per year for each of the next two years. We are in the process of developing a plan that has two major goals: 1) having our students succeed here at Western; 2) to preserve employment to those people around the university. We will know more after the State economist makes a revenue forecast on February 20th.

We currently have $50 million to spend on our new residence hall and the Health and Wellness Center.

We project no reduction in personnel to the end of the year. We anticipate being more selective in replacing positions that become vacant or approving any new positions. Our goal for the rest of this year, and going into the next biennium is to avoid lay-offs.

We will probably give about a million and a half dollars back to the state. This would come out of our fund balance.

Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU, Max Beach's Report

Last week we had our Green Week--our annual Energy Sustainable Practices event that we hold on campus. Students pledged to change their practices toward more sustainable practices.

Our student fee committee has proposed a $9.00 fee increase. Open hearings will be held tonight and tomorrow evening. Final decisions will be made next week.

ASWOU and the Oregon Student Association are working in the legislature with five priorities: tuition and funding; need-based aid; student parent child-care; tuition equity and some anti-bullying legislation for k-12.

We have a lobby day on the 26th of February.
Provost Kent Neely's Report

OUS Board and Provost Council met here last Thursday. The majority of the meeting time was taken up by the Chancellor's report. He expressed concern about the current biennium and the ability to meet required budgetary commitments through the end of the fiscal year, 30 June. The legislature is working very hard trying to find solutions to the rapidly declining revenue for the state agencies and, consequently, OUS has been asked to look at a variety of measures meant to reduce expenses. The legislature is especially interested in low enrollment programs and lowered enrollment trends at regional campuses. Simultaneously, institutions are in the process of reviewing tuition rates and determining the best scenario for rates for the coming two years. We can expect that thresholds for class section minima to come under intense scrutiny for the fall and following terms.

The Chancellor has made it clear that this is not the time for new program requests even for justified requests. If something does go forward, we can expect a high level of scrutiny about demonstrating demand, revenue, expenses, and also the number of graduates that a program would produce.

A summary of the board meeting can be found at: http://www.ous.edu/news_and_information/news/020609.php

IV. Old Business

None

V. New Business

Request to establish 800 course numbers: JoNan LeRoy Director for DEP

It is proposed that WOU define 800 Professional Development numbers.

Request to establish 807 and 808 Professional Development courses: JoNan LeRoy

It is proposed to define 807 Professional Development Seminar and 808 Professional Development Workshop coursework.

807 and 808 Professional Development courses would be coordinated by DEP. 807 and 808 classes will not be published in the schedule of classes. The Registrar's Office would transcript Professional Development courses. This proposal also includes the stipulation that these specialized courses cannot be part of any WOU degree.


Graduate Studies: Linda Stonecipher, Director of Graduate Studies

Proposed: a conditional admission proposal for graduate language requirement. This proposal was approved by Faculty Senate Graduate Studies Committee on Jan. 20, 2009. The purpose of the Conditional Admission Policy for International Graduate Students is to provide students who have English skills that are slightly below admission requirements with the opportunity to take English language courses for a year in order to improve their language skills. The main intent of this policy is to create an educational environment that emphasizes English language development that will provide international students with the necessary foundation for graduate level coursework.


Military Science: Colonel Susuico

Proposal for MS 118 designated as an LACC class. Four year ROTC students are required to take PE 118 every single term. PE 118 is open to all students in Western. This proposal is to create a MS 118 course that is strictly for ROTC students. This way students will pay for, and receive credit for MS 118 rather than having students enroll in a couple of PE 118 classes and just show up for the other PE 118 classes. A maximum of 12 MS 118 credit hours would be taken over the four years.

Revised Sports Leadership Minor: Marita Cardinal

The current minor in Sports Leadership is in need of revision because of curricular and personnel changes that have occurred in the Division of Health and Physical Education over the past few years. Three changes are proposed:

1) Change in language for the elective course options from: "Choose three credits total from coaching classes and /or practicum" to "Choose six credits of sport- or coaching-related courses and/or coaching practicum, with advisor approval."

2) Increase the credit hours from 2 to 3 for PE 361

3) Add PE 420: Motor Learning for Coaches as an optional choice.


Theater Arts: Michael Philips

Michael Philips presented a number of small curricular changes and corrections to theater degree programs. Additional classes are added to fill curricular holes and to better align the program with the National Association of Schools of Theater (NAST). Changes do not alter the total number of required credits for each degree.


Graphic Design: Diane Tarter

Proposed title changes for some of the existing courses and three new courses. The three added courses (Digital Design A423, A424, A425) will run parallel to the Print Design sequence. The new courses provide more options for graphic design students. Students may choose to take one or both of the 400 level sequences after completing all prerequisites in art foundations, introductory 200 level courses, and the 300 level year-long sequence. This flexible choice option fits within the 84 credits required in the art major. This addition is proposed in order to align WOU's art program with current practices and university offerings in the state, our region, and the nation.

Music: Joe Harchenko

New course proposal: MUS 404- Junior Seminar. This is in response to students' requests that certain topics covered in the senior seminar would be more helpful covered in the junior year. We would be removing one elective from the degree.

 Currently music majors are required to do a capstone project, such as a senior recital. This is a critical component of our assessment and necessary for our NASM accreditation. Currently, we assign an incomplete to students in MUS 405 until they have completed their capstone project, which often must be scheduled in the term following MUS405 due to performance schedules and hall availability. Also, the work for the capstone project is really covered in the MUP sequence, or occasionally by other courses, and the grading for MUS 405 is not really related to the capstone project. In order for us to be more in line with other institutions, a zero-credit hour requirement that would be passed upon successful completion of the capstone project needs to be created.

VI. Additional Reports and Items

No additional reports and items

VII. Meeting Adjourned
4:45

Minutes 27 January 2009

| No Comments


Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, January 27th, 2008 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center


I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Scott Beaver, Roy Bennett, Mark Perlman for Susan Daniel, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, who for Shaun Huston?, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Elisa Maroney, John Minahan, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Joe Peng, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite, Curt Yehnert, Mark Van Steeter, Peggy Pedersen, Sandra Hedgepeth, Katherine Schmidt, Joe Harchenko

II. Corrections and approval of minutes from January 13th, 2009 meeting
Action: Minutes approved with minor corrections.

III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President, Mark Girod's Report

1. Joel Alexander, Inter-institutional faculty representative, has shared that there will be a faculty sponsored coffee, Friday, Feb. 6th at 7:30 just prior to the OUS board meeting. Room to be announced.

2. Honors course proposal deadline has been extended to February 9th.

In executive meeting:

1. Executive agreed to reimbursed Shaun Huston's personal payment for Survey Monkey.

2. Approved minor changes to Special Education 200 and 409 as well as
minor program changes (catalogue language) in music.


President John Minahan's report:

Board meeting is at WOU next month. In April, we will have the bi-yearly official board meeting here. We will be sharing aspects of our university with the board members. Please consider attending.

There is a bill in the legislature by representative House talks about merging two regional universities; we, however, are not one of the universities being considered. There is also talk of restructuring the system so there wouldn't be as many universities. We are not in that conversation. We are under the assumption that this institution does not want to be merged. However, if anyone in the institution sees advantages to merging, and would like to raise issues, they are welcome.

We are moving ahead with decisions about our residence hall construction and the Health and Wellness Center. This been through the senate but must still go through the house. The cost is $30 million.

Our freshman numbers are up 18% above last year. This winter we are up 7.7%, that's 356 students this term, mostly continuing numbers.

We are anticipating a 20% cut in budget. We will plan for the worst. Our priority is to keep personnel. We are financially sound.

Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU, Max Beach's Report
No report

Provost Kent Neely's Report

Provost Neely shared an Academic Infrastructure Committee progress report. This included information on smart classrooms, technology upgrades, equipment, expenditures, and future initiatives. PowerPoint report is available online at http:www__________________

In Provost's Council, there was continuing discussion regarding change in admission procedures that will allow for an automatic entrance into an Oregon university. That is moving forward.

We have been having a number of conversations regarding the current economy. Provosts have been asked to prepare a variety of responses to questions that would serve the Chancellor and his staff as they brief the legislature.

The sustainability Center in Portland continues to move forward. They are trying to achieve a Living Building. This is a new designation which is above lead status which would indicate that the building has a negative impact where it exists. There will be opportunities for campuses and private industry to showcase projects. This is about a $25 million project.

IV. Old Business

Dance Proposal: Deborah Jones
(See Jan. 13 minutes for summary of proposed changes).

Action: Senate unanimously approved the Dance proposal.

Academic Requirements Committee: "Q" Designation Courses
(See Jan. 13 minutes for summary of proposed changes).

Action: Senate approved (with three abstentions) the motion that stated that ARC will execute a review of potential "Q" classes and bring that back to this body with language that will indicate that "Q" designation courses will be found online.


Music, new course; MUS 105: Kevin Helppie
(See Jan. 13 minutes for summary of proposed changes).

Action: Senate unanimously approved the new course MUS 105 to be added to the LACC.

Health: Kathy _____ for Peggy Petersen
(See Jan. 13 minutes for summary of proposed changes).

Action: Senate unanimously approved the Health proposal.

English: Curt Yehnert representing Marjory Lange
(See Jan. 13 minutes for summary of proposed changes).

Action: Senate unanimously approved the proposed English curriculum changes.

V. New Business

No new business

VI. Additional Reports and Items

No additional reports and items

VII. Meeting Adjourned
5:00

Minutes 13 January 2009

| No Comments



Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, January 13th, 2009 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center


I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Scott Beaver, Roy Bennett, Mark Perlman (for Susan Daniel), Gwenda Rice (for Sue Dauer), Bryan Dutton, David Foster, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Shaun Huston, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Elisa Maroney, John Minahan, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Joe Peng, Dana Ulveland, Joe Harchenko, Peggy Pedersen, Mark Van Steeter, Sandy Hedgepeth, Katherine Schmidt

II. Corrections and approval of minutes from November 25th, 2008 meeting
Action: Minutes approved with correction as noted.

III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President, Mark Girod's Report

1. We are still working to constitute our new Faculty Senate Awards Committee. One representative still needed from Business and Economics.

2. University Computing Services has developed a system, at the request of the registrar, complying with FERPA guidelines, that enables students to get academic performance references by faculty. More will be shared with the university committee shortly.

3. In executive meeting:

Executive Committee approved minor curriculum revisions: SPED 672; ENT 320;ENT 330;BA 315; MUS 181; MUS 182; MUS 183; Dance 496; SPED 447; HIST 698; CJ 322; Music History to Musicology


President John Minahan's report

Applications and admits are currently well ahead of last year's numbers. Given the economic situation, we are hoping that this pattern continues to hold. However, the government must reduce the state budget by a proposed $140 million. This equates to a budget reduction across all state agencies by 1.1%. This means an approximate $9 million cut for the Oregon State University system and a $442,000 impact for WOU. Given that our fund balance is high, we are able to cover this from our fund balance. In addition, we were able to cover the money our students lost from the Oregon Opportunity Grants. This worked out to an average of $80 for each full time student, and $40 for part time students. Our students have been notified that WOU will cover that cost this year. We will also spend $250,000 on Perkins loans (a revolving loan account that we have). We will also finish the phase two project on HSS. This is about a 2.5 million dollar project. The remaining $600,000 to finish the project has been moved into the project fund.

We anticipate seeing a 10% budget decline next year in the state. That is $4.5 million. It is possible that this could go to 15%. We will try to keep revenue stream up to offset budget declines.

Searches are fine. No additional positions will be added unless covering retirement or loss of personnel.


Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report


ASWOU, Max Beach's Report

No report


Provost Kent Neely's Report

Provost's Council will be meeting this Thursday. At the next meeting, Provost Neely will share the events at the Provost's Council as well as the progress that has been made by the Academic Infrastructure Committee.



IV. Old Business

Graduate School Policy Consideration: Mary Bucy, chair of Graduate Studies Committee

To maintain compliance with immigration international students must be full time with the exception of one term where students may be under a nine-hour load. Our resident students have five years to complete a 45 credit hour degree--our international students have five terms to finish a degree. Theses must be completed in about two terms while our resident students normally take at least three terms. Comprehensive exams are often given prior to completion of all classes. Given these circumstances, we have brought forth the 'Reduced Enrollment' proposal.
Modeled on OSU plan, our plan will state that students enrolled in the three-hour course (699 Completion of Thesis or Comprehensive Study, name yet to be determined) will be recognized as full time students. Immigration will allow students to stay for four terms under this status. This was unanimously approved in Senate Graduate Committee

Action: Senate unanimously agreed to approve the reduced enrollment policy.




V. New Business

Proposal from Academic Requirements Committee: Mark Henkels and Sheryl Beaver.

The Academic Requirements Committee shared a proposal that would identify and clarify the Qualitative Literacy courses that could be used to meet Bachelor of Science degree requirements. The changes that would be incorporated into the WOU course catalogue were shared.

The goal of Quantitative Literacy ('Q') courses at WOU is to expose students to the wide range of applications of mathematics and/or statistics in various disciplines and to produce students who are proficient in a core set of mathematical competencies. In a 'Q' course, college level mathematical and/or statistical concepts will be developed and used as an integral part of the course.

Guidelines for 'Q' Approval:
Students must have regular, frequent, assessable opportunities to use the mathematical and/or statistical related concepts.

The mathematical content should relate in a meaningful way to the discipline and should further the student's knowledge both in the discipline and in mathematical concepts.

The primary focus of the class should be the mathematical content OR the student is required to complete a product that requires them to complete a significant exercise or exercises applying the quantitative concepts with at least 33% of the course grade based on mathematical components of the class.

Curriculum Proposal from Music: Kevin Helpie

Kevin Helpie proposed a new course: MUS 105 The Magic of Mozart: An Appreciation of Music Fundamentals and the Ideals of the Enlightenment. The course explores how Mozart was in innovator in using a variety of traditions in new and innovative ways to express the tenets of the Enlightenment; takes a "birds-eye" view of the life of the composer; and, examines the irony of Mozart's use of an elitist art form as a vehicle to express a humanistic agenda.

Curriculum Proposal from Health Education: Peggy Pedersen

This proposal reduces the number of HE electives from 44 (minimum of 36 credits with HE prefix in consultation with advisor) or 24 upper division credits with HE prefix. This will change the existing total hours required for the HE major from 97 to 77.

A reduction of total hours required in the major puts the Community Health Education program more in line with other majors on campus and with similar health majors at other OUS institutions. The focus on upper division electives with a HE prefix reduces the need to micro manage a large open elective pool of 44 credit hours. Substitutions of courses in the elective pool should be greatly reduced, if not totally eliminated. The proposed changes will not impact other programs or Divisions on campus.

Curriculum Proposal from English: Marjory Lang

To simplify the English major, and make it a stronger program it is proposed to revise and clarify the numbering of the new literary studies sequence. The sequence of courses will be changed from the current ENG 223W and ENG 415 to ENG 218W, ENG 318, and ENG 418. The numbering of the new literary studies sequence will be clearer for students, advisors, and anyone from outside WOU who reads/evaluates students' transcripts. ENG 418, unlike 415, will not be a required course for the literature track, but one of the 400 level options. ENG 318 becomes the required theory course for the Literature track.

Curriculum Proposal from Dance: Deborah Jones

Deb Jones presented course and program changes. These are as follows: Dance Minor program change: Amendments to the minor are as follows: 1) The number of hours for required modern technique (previously 9 hours, now 6 hours); 2) Amended elective technique hours (previously 6 hours, now 11 hours); 3) Amended the required choreography courses from 10 hours to 4 hours. Improvisation (1 credit) and Composition I (3 credits) are required; Composition II (3) and Group Choreography (3) are now elective courses; 4) Elective credits have changed from 5 to 9 credits. Total hours for the minor remain the same: 33 total.

Changes to both major and minor include adding the following new courses: D220, 221, 222 Beginning Modern IV, V, VI; D210, 211, 222. Beginning Ballet IV, V, VI; D140 Conditioning for Dancers, D240 Wellness for Dancers, D451L Dance Production Lab

Change in both major and minor: D450 Dance Repertory - Course title amendment. This has also been moved from a required course to an elective. D496W Creativity - course description change

VI. Additional Reports and Items


Update from International Students and Scholars Affairs: Neng Yang

Neng Yang shared a report on International Students and Scholars Affairs with Senate. This included mission, curriculum, and events.

Joe Sendelbaugh reported on banner-based data

Joe Sendelbaugh spoke to how well our international students are doing. Between summer 2006 and summer 2008, international students show a grade point average 3.06. An Intensive English Program subgroup shows a 3.15 grade point average. Thirty-one graduate level international students will earn degrees before the end of winter term (13 professional projects, 18 comprehensive exams). Funding has been made available for two positions in the Writing Center--one of these being specifically for international students.


VII. Meeting Adjourned
5:00

Minutes 10-28-08

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Minutes 10-14-08

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Minutes 25 November 2008

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Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, November 25th, 2008 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center

I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Scott Beaver, Roy Bennett, Susan Daniel, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, Kathy Farrell, David Foster, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Shaun Huston, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Elisa Maroney, Mark Weiss for John Minahan, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Joe Peng, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite


II. Corrections and approval of minutes from November 11th, 2008 meeting
Action: Minutes approved.


III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President, Mark Girod's Report

In executive meeting:

1. Executive approved University Computing Services' web-editing support for faculty senate on an ongoing, "as needed," basis. Faculty Senate will pay $500.00 annually for this support. Requests to edit web pages and/or post files will occur within 72 hours. Either the Director of UCS or Faculty Senate Executive Committee can terminate this agreement at any time providing at least one academic quarter notice.

2. Please forward names of division representatives who will sit on Faculty Senate Awards Selection Committee to Bryan Dutton after Dec. 2nd division meetings.

3. Please recruit for Hispanic Committee Advisory Council. These names should be forwarded to David McDonald.


Mark Weiss' Report (for President John Minahan)

During last week's regularly scheduled Budget and Finance Committee meeting,
information was shared regarding the finances of the university. University's finances are strong, but given the current climate, there may be some clouds on the horizon.

The November 19th revenue forecast for this biennium and next biennium was adjusted--$170 million down for this biennium and an additional $750 million for next biennium.

Oregon University System was asked last week to take $10 million out of its state appropriation. A pro-rata amount for Western Oregon University would be roughly $500,000 representing about 5% of our appropriation for the last six months of the year, or about 1.2% of appropriation for the entire biennium. President Minahan was asked by the Chancellor's Office to state what actions we would take as a result of that reduction. We would reduce fund balance and take advantage of selective vacancies by not filling those positions and, where reasonable, cut back on some S&S costs. Raising tuition would be a last resort. We anticipate, however, ending up the year on target with a fund balance of approximately 15%.


Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU, Max Beach's Report
No report


Provost Kent Neely's Report

Provost Neely reported on wireless Internet access. Regular office Internet access per faculty member is $12.00 a month. Wireless access would be an additions $5.00 a month--$17.00 a month for both, or $204.00 for the academic year to provide faculty members with both office and wireless service.

We will provide wireless Internet access to any faculty member who needs it in order to provide their regular job-related duties. Service can be acquired, beginning the 2nd of February. This will allow sufficient time for the appropriate security devices to be put into the system. Those wishing wireless access will make requests through Division Head and Dean. Deans will fund the access out of their own budgets until the end of the fiscal year, at which time it will be decided whether S&S budgets need to be augmented to accommodate the wireless costs.

IV. Old Business

Academic Excellence Showcase:
The Academic Excellence Committee asked for Senate support that would be demonstrated though the endorsement of a university-wide letter. Executive Committee reviewed the Academic Excellence Showcase letter and endorsed the letter.

Action: Unanimously agreed that Senate would lend full support to the Academic Showcase Letter.

Restructuring of Gen Ed Committee:

Action: Unanimously agreed that Provost Neely would be added to the Gen Ed Committee as an Ex Officio Member.


V. New Business

Graduate School Policy Consideration:

Linda Stonecipher, Director of Graduate Studies, presented two documents regarding Reduced Enrollment Policy. The reduced enrollment policy will allow international students to enroll for a maximum of four terms of thesis, professional project or comprehensive exam work. This allows international students to take fewer than 9 credits in their final term and still comply with immigration regulations of maintaining full time enrollment through their program of study. This allows students to work on graduation requirements without having to register for unnecessary coursework or attempting to complete degrees with unreasonable deadlines.


VI. Additional Reports and Items

General Education Review Committee: Shaun Huston

Shaun Huston reported on the faculty survey that was designed last year and administered earlier this term. There were 109 total responses to the survey. The survey gave the committee a snapshot of faculty views of what students ought to be learning, and how well they are learning those things. The committee will provide survey data summary reports to Senate. Given a concern regarding confidentiality of data, username and password will not be broadcasted nor will the database username and password be provided to people to simply to look at the data in the survey. Huston will talk with Ella Taylor about removing the survey from Survey Monkey and archive the data on another less-accessible medium.

Western Oregon University doesn't have outcomes for general education right now. We have the statement of institutional aspirations for learning and a short set of outcomes for LACC specifically, but not for the Gen Ed Program more broadly. This suggests that a next step for the committee will be to look closely at developing general education outcomes. A subcommittee will be developed and then report back to the full committee with recommendations for outcomes.

International Education and Services Committee report: Doug Smith

Doug Smith reported on the assessment of WOU's progress in supporting international students. Challenges: 1) discrepancy has emerged as to indicators of student preparations and successful integration into academic program; 2) we still have much work to do improving communication across university units. The committee determined areas of focus and a number of recommendations were given. Recommendations included: A greater number of international students could make use of the writing center. The Intensive English Program should exist in a stronger structural relationship with other academic units; advising needs to be improved; students should be assigned a faculty advisor upon arrival to the campus; faculty workshops should be developed to assist faculty in dealing with international students. In the immediate future: the committee intends to survey faculty on their experience teaching and advising international students; the committee will find out what students themselves say about their experience at WOU; the committee will find ways of enhancing measures already in place during international student orientation.

International Education and Services Committee would like Faculty Senate to support the work and recommendations made by the committee.

Before doing so, and prior to sending this report out to the campus community, Senate will review the report once again at the January 13th Faculty Senate Meeting. Faculty Senate and will invite ISSA Director Neng Yang to share the ISSA perspectives on the report.


VII. Meeting Adjourned
5:05

11 November 2008

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Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, November 11th, 2008 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center


I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Scott Beaver, Roy Bennett, Susan Daniel, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, Kathy Farrell, Katherine Schmidt, David Foster, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Joe Harchanko, Sandra Hedgepeth, Shaun Huston, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Elisa Maroney, John Minahan, Kent Neely, Joe Peng, Mark VanSteeter, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite


II. Corrections and approval of minutes from October 28th, 2008 meeting
Action: Minutes approved.


III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President, Mark Girod's Report:

1) Bob Hautala has been serving as faculty senate representative to the Oregon University Senator Advisory Committee and will continue to do so.

2) Called on David McDonald--McDonald reported that a committee is being formed to guide and inform the university's actions to increase and retain the number of Latino and Hispanic students. Faculty Senate is asked to find a faculty representative of this 'yet to be established' Advisory Committee. The representative should have a sensitivity to, and a willingness to work with, students of Hispanic backgrounds. The committee will likely meet two to three times a year.

Senators are asked to report back to division and collect names of those interested in serving on this committee.

3) On July 8th, Senate approved the formation of new committee called the Faculty Senate Awards Selection Committee--a committee responsible for faculty awards selection, such as the Pastega Awards for Scholarship and Teaching. Senators are asked to take this information back to divisions and put forth a call for division representatives to serve on this committee. Please forward names to Bryan Dutton.

4) Senate Committee's web pages and document archives need to be updated and maintained. Given that chairs do not always have the requisite skills to do so, Bill Kernan was contacted to check on the possibility of Computer Services support in updating Faculty Senate Committee's web pages. Kernan thought this would be a possibility. This will be brought back for Senate's consideration next meeting as new business.


President John Minahan's Report:

1) President Minahan reported on the Presidential initiative on sustainability. This is a committee that was formed at the OUS level. Western Oregon University is ranked low in energy consumption. President Minahan expressed concern that there is an impression that there are easy and smart ways of reducing energy costs on the campus. Also of concern was that, throughout the scholarship review and throughout the board meeting review, no questions were raised about fairness or ethical issues involved around the use of energy. These include questions as to how consumption is measured, and the prolonging of disproportionate use of energy by Americans. Provost Neely has been asked to look at the issues of fairness that should be part of the calculus of energy consumption and conservation. Under conditions that included ethical consideration, President Minahan signed the commitment to go ahead with the initiative on sustainability. WOU will continue our green stance.

2) Legislative and Fiscal Office has asked us to begin developing plans for up to 20% budget cuts. Anticipated is a 5% cut in 07-09, 10% in 09-11, and then two subsequent 5% incremental cuts. It is the Chancellor's Office that is responsible to produce such a plan. We have no intention at this time identifying what cuts we will make. However, we will maintain our revenue sources. We will continue our efforts for retention and recruitment of students. Any cuts will be prioritized, with the reduction of under-enrolled sections being a last course of action.


ASWOU President Max Beach's Report

Max Beach reported that ASWOU was able to register over 1000 students to vote in this year's election. Beach is also preparing for the incremental fee committee process, working on a styro foam ban in the Monmouth Independence area, and writing an executive order that promotes sustainability within ASWOU and our student clubs pertaining to using recyclable material as well as locally produced goods. President Beach is also requesting that students pass a resolution in honor of the passing of John Peterson, former ASWOU president 92-93, and will send a condolence letter to Peterson's family.

Provost Kent Neely's Report

1. Provost Neely reported on an executive order by Governor Kulongoski--to develop a Post-secondary Education Model to be used by state policy makers, helping to determine the reasonable costs of providing a quality post-secondary education for Oregonians. The Post-secondary Quality Education Commission has taken leadership in establishing actions to complete this model in the form of the 40-40-20 initiative, an initiative still in its infancy. Discussion at Provost Council was how to see how this might come to fruition. A press release of this initiative can be found at http://governor.oregon.gov/Gov/P2007/press_182807.shml


2. Inter Institutional Faculty asked for research about the efficacy of dual credit programs. Data has been collected and the early results are that dual credit programs are effective. They will continue to gather data on a wider range of offerings to see if that holds true.

3. Board member, David Yaden, said that there is an opportunity for a sustainability center to be build in Portland where campuses across the state could showcase sustainability efforts.

4. Provost Neely spoke briefly about the Learning Outcomes and Assessment Initiative that is taking place across the state. More information regarding these efforts can be accessed at: http://www.aacu.org/value/

5. Data is being collected on failed and diminished searches so that board members are better informed as to the state of faculty searches, and also to enhance presentations to the legislature in demonstrating how we are not competitive with our peer institutions in terms of attracting faculty. The current numbers show that 25% of searches failed. This number jumps to 35% when diminished searches (other than first candidate accepted) are included.


IV. Old Business

None

V. New Business

Academic Excellence Showcase:

Jeff Templeton reported on the Academic Excellence Showcase to be held on Thursday, May 28th, 2009. Templeton noted that last year's event featured 300 talks, posters, and performances by WOU students. In addition, 75 faculty members served as session chairs and/or faculty sponsors. Templeton asked that: a) faculty support and endorse the showcase; b) that faculty not hold classes on that day; and c) that Faculty Senate serve as a conduit to get the showcase information out to faculty and students. Templeton also noted that submissions will be due in approximately late April. The Academic Excellence Showcase website will provide more information. (http://www.wou.edu/showcase/)

The General Education Review Committee:

Speaking for Shaun Huston, Jeff Templeton stated that the Gen Ed Review Committee would like to invite Provost Neely to act as an ex-officio member of the committee. Senate is being asked for approval to invite Provost Neely given that the committee is under the auspices of the Faculty Senate

VI. Additional Reports and Items

Academic Infrastructure Committee: Shirley Lincicum gave a report on the Wireless Internet access project initiated last year, and provided a follow-up proposal for Faculty Senate's consideration. As eight requests from last fall were funded, the request was to get Faculty Senate's approval to request funding from the administration to fund the remaining 9 of the 17 approved requests.

Action: It was approved to support the Academic Infrastructure Committee's request to administration for the additional $1440.00 needed to fund the remaining 9 wireless connections.

VII. Meeting Adjourned
5:05


Minutes

Minutes 28 October 2008

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Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, October 28th, 2008 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center


I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Kit Andrews, Scott Beaver, Roy Bennett, Susan Daniel, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, Eric Bruce for Kathy Farrell, David Foster, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Sandy Hedgepeth, Shaun Huston, Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Elisa Maroney, John Minahan, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Joe Peng, Mark VanSteeter, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite


II. Corrections and approval of minutes from October 14th, 2008 meeting
Action: Minutes approved with minor correction. Corrections noted and made.


III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President, Mark Girod's Report

In executive meeting:

1. Bryan Dutton and Sarah Boomer, both from the Academic Infrastructure Committee, will serve on the Campus Budget Committee. Bryan will serve Fall term; Sarah, Winter term through Spring term.

2. Course title change: Ed 643 Contemporary Teaching Strategies to ED 643 Secondary Learning and Development.

3. Reviewed WOU's Drug and Alcohol-Free Community Policy. Feedback provided to Gary Dukes, Vice President of Student Affairs.


President John Minahan's Report

President Minahan reported on enrollment figures: New record enrollment. Basic credit hour programs grew by 4.6%. We currently have 4691 students in basic classes (not counting continuing education students). Will report a head count of 5371 in the newspaper. This number includes part time students. Last year, that head count report was 5037. As a result, the budget is in very good order.

Will be asking Deans and Provost to spend down a fund balance to 15%.

Questions brought further discussion regarding wireless Internet access and adding new faculty.

Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU, Max Beach's Report
No report

Provost Kent Neely's Report

No report from Provosts' Council as the Council will not meet until Nov. 6.

Provost Neely reported on the first OUS Sustainability Conference held at the University of Oregon. This conference was a response to a directive from Governor Ted Kulongoski directing state agencies to develop sustainability plans--plans that move to achieve greenhouse gas reduction and reducing energy consumption. To find out more regarding the work of some of the conference's plenary speakers see:
Leith Sharp of the Harvard Green Campus Initiative (www.greencampus.harvard,edu/about/startup.php);
Larry Eisenberg of LACCD Builds Green (www.laccdbuildsgreen.org);
and Alan Durning, or Sightline Institute (www.sightline.org).
Sustainability is an active agenda item for OUS institutions and sustainability issues will continue to be considerate at WOU.




IV. Old Business

None


V. New Business

None


VI. Additional Reports and Items

Study Abroad report: Karen Haberman

Karen Haberman provided a report on the International Education and Services Committee's review of the Study Abroad Program. This was a report initially requested by Associate Provost, David McDonald. The goal of the report was to provide a comprehensive review of the current status of Study Abroad on campus. The report considered program strengths, as well as the areas that need improvement. Finally, recommendations were provided by the committee that would address weaknesses of the Study Abroad Program as well as ways to maintain the strengths of the program. The report also addressed the alignment of the Study Abroad Program to the standards and recommendations set forth by the Association for International Educators (NAFSA).

Action: Senate gave support to the report as it moves forward to Dave McDonald's office.

Honors Program report : Gavin Keulks (WOU Honors Director)

Gavin Keulks reported on the Honors program "Challenges and Opportunities." This report was primarily an informational session to explain what the Honors program does and what some of the challenges facing the program are as a necessary precursor to putting forth concrete proposals for improvement. According to Keulks, among the challenges are lack of flexibility in the curriculum; incompatibility of the Honors Program with other WOU programs; and, an indefensible 55 hour writing intensive requirement. Opportunities were seen to be a relatively high student demand for the Honors Program and a student body with academically qualified students. Keulks reported on some of strategies to improve the program.

More information regarding the Honors Program can be found at: http://www.wou.edu/provost/honors/

Appointment of IIFS representative:

Action: Joel Alexander appointed as Inter Institutional Faculty Representative.

Updating curriculum change paperwork

Both Curriculum Committee and the Graduate Committee gave consideration as to how to integrate the "Program Log Form" into the program or curricular change process. Both committees are in support of integrating the program log form with the caveat that the third question should be designated "For Dean's Use Only."

Given the need to act on this proposal, senate considered how to move forward in a timely manner.

Action: Agreed that the proposal would be voted on today.

Bryan Dutton reviewed changes to the Curriculum Committee and the Graduate Committee Guidelines and Procedures forms. The changes endorsed by both the Curriculum Committee and the Graduate Committee, incorporating the Program Log Form, were shared.

Action: Senate agreed to adopt the changes to the "Curriculum Committee Guidelines and Procedures for Curricular Proposals" and "The Graduate Study Committee Guidelines and Procedures for Curricular Proposals," with the inclusion of the wording change in both documents from "Curriculum Change Log" to "Program Log Form."

VII. Meeting Adjourned
5:05

Minutes 7-8-08

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Minutes 14 October 3008

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Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, October 14th, 2008 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center


I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Joe Peng, Sandy Hedgepeth, Katherine Schmidt, Kathy Farrell, Sue Dauer, Elaina Jamieson, Robert M. Hautala, Klay Kruczek, Cheryl Davis, Kent Neely, Mark VanSteeter, Jason Waite, Kit Andrews, David Foster, John Minahan, Susan Daniel, David Murphy, Ike Nail (for Joe Harchenko), Shaun Huston, Elisa Maroney, Mark Girod, Bryan Dutton, Roy Bennett, Scott Beaver, Pam Salmous (Grad Student Rep), Dana Ulveland

Item moved from section VI : Election of faculty senate secretary
Action: It was approved that Dana Ulveland would act as Senate Secretary

II. Corrections and approval of minutes from July 8th, 2008 meeting
Action: Minutes approved with two minor corrections. Corrections noted and made.


III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President, Mark Girod's Report

A note to faculty that curriculum proposals are due to the Curriculum Committee by the first meeting in January.

Time given to Shaun Huston to provide initial report on work of the Gen. Ed. Review Committee.

Shaun Huston Report:

Reported that the General Ed Program Ad Hoc committee met and has outlined the following steps:
1. Faculty survey was produced
2. Survey submitted to faculty (at last count 101 respondees);
3. Committee will meet this quarter to review results and then determine next course of action.

President John Minahan's Report

President Minahan reported on the current enrollment figures for the university. At this point, current student FTE is 4441, up slightly from last year's fourth-week tally of 4244. Total head count is 5,181, an increase to date of 166 or 3.31%. International Student numbers are 325, up 81 from last year. Freshman numbers are down slightly, from 959 to 904 from last year but up 202 continuing students which includes 112 freshmen.

The university has been able to continue to staff courses at 18 to 1 for upper division courses and 24 to 1 for lower division courses.


Thirteen new faculty hires were made during the 2007-2008 school year.

VP of Finance and Administration, Mark Weiss's Report

Vice President Weiss gave a short summary regarding the state of the projected construction of the new student residence hall. Due to perceived need, administration went to E-board (the legislative Emergency Board) to request an additional 9 million dollars in order to construct a 300 bed residence hall rather than the initial 200 bed residence hall. The Emergency Board increased the Other Funds Capital Construction expenditure limitation of the Department of Higher Education by $8.8 million for the new student residence hall. However, given last week's interest rate increases, the project is now being reconsidered further by WOU administration.

Provost Kent Neely's Report
Provost Neely reported on the Provosts' Council Academic review report. The review report included a new program review policy, that provides a systematic way to improve programs by examining: adequacy of resources needed to sustain a quality offering; continued ability to address access and market demand; currency of the curriculum within the evolution of the discipline or field; and Success of the program in terms of student learning. Detailed information can be accessed at OUS and Institutional Academic Program Review (www.ous.edu/about/provcouncil/pacapp.php)
Provost Neely also reported on a pilot report from the OUS Office of Institutional Research that seeks to answer key questions about students taking college work in the form of dual credit. The pilot report tried to answer key questions about students taking college work in the form of dual credit. The OUS Office of Institutional Research report can be accessed at (http://www.ous.edu/dept/ir/reports/dualcredit/DualCreditinOregon04-2008.pdf)


Provost Neely commented on OUS's announcement that Oregon will participate in a new initiative sponsored by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), designed to improve general education outcomes of college students and to help them reach a level of learning that they need to succeed in the global economy and society. The goals of the initiative include such things as: establishing 21st century aims and outcomes for general education programs to successfully prepare students for global, civic and economic challenges facing Americans; and, providing education "roadmaps" that help transfer students achieve their educational goals even as they attend multiple institutions. Details can be found at (http://www.ous.edu/news_and_information/news/072808.php)

Provost Keely also commented on the Association of American Colleges and Universities "Liberal Education and America's Promise" (LEAP) initiative to champion the value of a liberal education, focusing campus practice on fostering essential learning outcomes for all students, and advancing and communicating about the importance of undergraduate liberal education for all students. Details (www.aacu.org/leap/index.cfm).


Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU, Max Beach's Report
No report


IV. Old Business

Earth science program changes

Steve Taylor reviewed the Earth Science Program curriculum proposal. The proposal represented a fine-tuning of Earth Science curriculum with a goal to strengthen and modernize the major to best serve student needs. (Refer to Faculty Senate Meeting Minutes 6/8/08 for detail).

Action: Proposed modifications to the Earth Science curriculum are approved.


V. New Business

None


VI. Additional Reports and Items


Appointment of IIFS representative
Action: It was approved that Ike Nail would act as IIFS representative.

Updating curriculum change paperwork

Bryan Dutton presented suggestions for Guidelines and Procedures for Curriculum Proposals. The primary purpose was to bring instruction sets up to date, and to reflect current practice. There was some discussion regarding the incorporation of the curriculum log into the guidelines. Proposed changes are tabled until next meeting.

Action: It was approved that Deans would give curriculum log to Senate President, who will then distribute the log to the chairs of the Curriculum Committee and the Graduate Committee so that each committee can review and consider incorporating the log into the Guidelines for Curricular Proposals. The revised guidelines will be brought back to Faculty Senate on October 28th.

VII. Meeting Adjourned
5:05


Minutes 5-27-08

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Minutes 8 July 2008

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Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
June 8, 2008 3:30
Hamersly Library 107

I. Meeting was called to order at 3:30. In attendance were Mark Girod, Elisa Maroney, Scott Beaver, Shaun Huston, Joe Harchanko (for Keller Coker), Zhuoming "Joe" Peng, Bob Hautala, Roy Bennett, Klay Kruczek, Bryan Dutton, David Murphy, Cheryl Davis, Sue Dauer, Wangeci Gatimu, WOU President John Minahan, Peter Courtney, Jennifer Hansen, Nancy France, Judy Vanderburgh
Dean of library, Steve Taylor, and Jeff Templeton

II. The minutes from the Faculty Senate meetings of 5/13/08 were approved by unanimous voice vote.

III. Faculty Senate President Mark Girod's Report
Faculty Senate still in need of secretary. Still no takers. Joe Harchanko agreed to take notes for the summer meeting. Executive session approved new education class that was previously a special topics, and approved prerequisites in Spanish and German.

President John Minahan's Report
WOU finished the financial year with 15% fund balance. Complete report on projects is forthcoming. Dorm rates are increasing. We have a current deficit of 50 beds for the fall, prompting plans to reactivate Maske earlier than planned to accommodate demand for dorms. An $11 million bond authority to cover new residence hall. It would be 250 beds. A request to the board will ask for $17 million to expand plan. Planning to build by 2010.

Data on enrollment for last academic year shows that we are very close to our highest average ever. We are down 3% for summer enrollment.

The Chancellor's management team for small universities came up with no usable recommendations. Recommendations for registration and optical image scanning would result in cost increase over current methods.

Management and Systems Information degrees should be approved Friday July 11.

We are looking for opportunities for naming buildings. Nursing building is ahead of schedule. Natural Science will be finished with in the next 30 days.

Peter Courtney presented a poster created by the Oregonian newspaper commemorating the recent and now famous episode at the WOU vs. Central Washington women's softball game. The Oregonian will send a copy of the poster to every high school in Washington and Oregon. The event was nominated for an ESPY award for Sports Event of the Year.

Staff Senate President Alice Sprague's Report
Jennifer Hanson was introduced as new staff senate president.

ASWOU President Max Beach: No Report
Hilda Rosselli, Provosts' Council Report: No Report

IV. Old Business
Committee on Committees recommendation regarding Faculty Awards:
Elisa Maroney stated that the Committee was charged with deciding about what to do with awards given to faculty. The committee on committees recommended a new committee. There was concern expressed about the committee's representation concerning professional programs. Bryan Dutton suggested the scope of the new committee would be a short-term commitment concerned only with addressing awards issues. Bob Hautala asked if we need a whole new committee, citing that some departments have trouble filling existing slots.

In response, Elisa stated that the new committee would not meet regularly, but as needed to handle scholarship and teaching awards. It would be a short investment of time to meet obligations. Its role would pull responsibility out of other committees. Part of the new committee's charge would be to come up with criteria for awards.

Approval of a new Graduate Performance Certificate in Music was passed with a unanimous voice vote

IIFS replacement: Ike Nail and Mark Perlman were nominated to fill vacancy on IIFS. Mark Girod stated that he would contact the nominees for further discussion.

Secretary election: Suggestions included a rotating secretary suggested and a paid position for someone from Institutional and Teaching Research to take notes that would be passed on to executive committee. No final decisions were made.

V. New Business
Committee on committees: Bryan Dutton, Ryan Hickerson, Shaun Huston, Sue Dauer, and Bob Hautala were voted to fill vacancies on the Committee on Committees.
Program changes from Earth Science:
Four new courses were proposed consisting of a 100 level ES199 Special Topics (4 credits), and three new upper division courses: ES 304 Looking at fossils, ES341 Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems, a Course in Volcanology and a Course in Seismology. Rotation would not require additional FTE.
Eight courses would have title and description changes.
Changes to Earth Science major and minor, Earth System Science Minor, and Geology Minor were proposed.
The changes were referred for a vote in fall. Refer to Appendix A for details.

The meeting was then adjourned.


Appendix A
Memorandum
Earth Science Program - Earth and Physical Sciences Department

From: Earth Science Faculty Members (J. Myers, S. Taylor, and J. Templeton)
To: NSM Division Curriculum Committee, Division/Department Chairs, Campus
Curriculum Committee, Faculty Senate, WOU Administration
Date: April 30, 2008
Re: Proposed modifications to Earth Science courses, major, and minors

We have enclosed proposed modifications to the Earth Science curriculum for review by the WOU campus community. The proposed curriculum changes are summarized as follows: 1) permanent course changes and approvals, 2) modifications to the Earth Science Major, and 3) modifications to the Earth Resources, Earth System Science, and Geology Minors. The Earth Science Major was extensively reorganized in 2000, a process that was reviewed and formally approved by the WOU curriculum committee, faculty senate, administration, and OUS board. The changes proposed herein represent a fine-tuning of Earth Science curriculum, the goal of which is to strengthen and modernize the major to best serve student needs.

1) Permanent Course Changes and Approvals:
 Add new course: ES 199 - Special Topics in Earth System Science (4 cr)
 Change description to ES 203/203L - Principles of Geology
 Add new course: ES 304 - Survey of the Fossil Record (3 cr)
 Change course title, number, description, and number of credit hours for ES 303 - Geo-Techniques: Petrographic Microscopy (1 cr) to ES 301 - Petrographic Microscopy (2 cr)
 Change course title, number, description, and number of credit hours for ES 301 - GeoTechniques: Quantitative Applications (1 cr) to ES 302 - Quantitative Methods (2 cr)
 Change course number and title for ES 302 - GeoTechniques: Geology in the Field to ES 303 - Geologic Field Techniques
 Add new course: ES 341 - Fundamentals to Geographic Information Systems (4 cr)
 Change description to ES 351 - Geology for Educators
 Add new course: ES 354 - Volcanoes and Earthquakes (3 cr)
 Modify prerequisites and description for ES 392 - Sedimentary Geology
 Change number of credits for ES 454/554 - Volcanology from 3 cr to 4 cr
 Modify prerequisites for ES 492/592 - GIS Applications in Earth Science

These changes will have minimal impact on faculty FTE and will not require any new faculty lines in Earth Science. In addition, the proposed modifications will have no impact on campus scheduling or room assignments as most of the impacted classes are taught in the dedicated Earth Science Lab (NS 218) or NS 101 in the late afternoon and evening hours. More detailed justification statements for these course changes are provided on the attached curriculum change forms.

The modifications to the Earth Science Major and the Earth Resources, Earth System Science, and Geology Minors are summarized and justified, where appropriate, below.

2) Modifications to the Earth Science Major:
 Change required number of credits from 74-75 to 73-78. The change in the number of credits is necessary to accommodate the various curriculum modifications proposed herein.
 Remove the CS 161 and CS 162 (Computer Science I and II) option from the Earth Science Major. As originally conceived in 2000, the Earth Science Major was designed with two quantitative-skills options, CS 161-162 (Computer Programming) or MTH 251-252 (Calculus). During the past eight years, the scope and focus of CS 161 and CS 162 have changed to provide more of a starting foundation for the computer science majors, rather than a general elective for non-CS majors. Few Earth Science students have elected to take the CS option since its inception, and the CS 161-162 course content is no longer applicable to our major. For these reasons, we would like to eliminate the CS 161-162 option from the Earth Science Major.
 Add three Math options for students to choose from in Major. In addition to eliminating the CS option in the major, we propose to create three Math options for students to choose from. The three options will be (A) MTH 112-MTH 243, (B) MTH 243-MTH 251, and (C) MTH 251-MTH 252. We are modeling and adopting best practices from the Biology Major. Having three math options, will provide greater flexibility for students majoring in Earth Science.
 Changes in "GeoTechniques" courses (ES 301-303). Remove ES 301, 302, 303 GeoTechniques (3 cr) from Earth Science Major and replace with ES 301 Petrographic Microscopy (2 cr) and ES 302 Quantitative Methods (2 cr). These changes are needed to update the catalog to reflect operating procedures that have been completed via "Request for Temporary Course Approval" for the past two years. These changes will align course numbering to follow fall-winter-spring rotation, thus improving sequencing through the Earth Science degree. The change from one three-hour lab per week (1 cr.) to one hour of lecture and two hours of lab per week (2 credits) will allow for greater class productivity with two class meetings per week, and increasing the number of credits will bring these courses more in line with the workload. The "Geology in the Field" course is no longer being offered on a regular basis, so we need to remove this from the Earth Science Major, but retain it as an option for future use.
 Change the Computer Science requirement for the B.S. and B.A degree requirments. In the notes section, we propose to change the Computer Science requirement to "completion of 2 to 4 credit hours of Computer Science coursework depending on the chosen Math option". Students working towards the B.S. and B.A. degrees will complete MTH 112, MTH 243, MTH 251, and/or MTH 252 for a total of 8-10 hours. They will need to complete 2 to 4 credit hours of Computer Science to fulfill the Math and Computer Science graduation requirement of 12 credits.
 Replace WR 321 with WR 322 in notes section. "For this major, 4 hours of Writing Intensive course work should come from WR 322 (Technical Writing)." This change is necessary because the English Department recently split the old WR 321 (Business and Technical Writing) into two courses.
 Changes to "Choose 1 course in Volcanology/Petrology" section of ES major:
o Add the new course ES 354 Volcanoes and Earthquakes (3 cr) to increase potential electives options for Earth Science majors.
o Change number of credits from (3) to (3-4) to accommodate increase in credits from 3 to 4 for ES 454.
 Changes to "Choose 1 course in Environmental Geology/Surface Processes" section of ES major:
o Add the new course ES 341 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems to increase potential electives options for Earth Science majors.
o Change number of credits from (3) to (3-4) to accommodate the new 4-credit course ES 341.
 Change to "Choose 1 course in Sedimentology/Paleobiology" section of ES major:
o Add the new course ES 304 Survey of the Fossil Record (3 cr) to be offered in 3 year rotation with ES 431 and ES 491/591.

3a) Modifications to the Earth Resources Minor:
 Remove ES 454 Volcanology and ES 460 Energy and Mineral Resources from list of required courses. Instead, add list of limited electives to include ES 321 Structural Geology, ES 354 Volcanoes and Earthquakes, ES 454 Volcanology, and ES 460 Energy and Mineral Resources. This list of limited electives will allow students greater flexibility to successfully complete this minor and increase the breadth of Earth Resources courses in the minor.
 Add ES 341 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems to electives list.
 Modify number of credit hours for minor from 27 to 27-30 to accommodate the above changes. The total number of courses required to complete this minor will remain the same, but the number of credit hours will possibly increase depending on whether students complete 3 or 4 credit hour courses.

3b) Modifications to the Earth System Science Minor:
 Create four sets of related elective courses for students to choose from for this minor. These lists of limited electives will allow students greater flexibility to successfully complete this minor and increase the breadth of Earth system courses in the minor.
o Choose two courses from the following list: ES 331, ES 390, GS 351
o Choose one course from the following list: ES 341, ES 473, ES 476, ES 492
o Choose one course from the following list: ES 354, ES 454, ES 460
o Choose one course from the following list: ES 304, ES 431, ES 453, ES 491
 Modify number of credit hours for minor from 27 to 25-28 to accommodate the above changes. The total number of courses required to complete this minor will remain the same, but the number of credit hours will possibly increase depending on whether students complete 3 or 4 credit hour courses.

3c) Modifications to the Geology Minor:
 Remove ES 301, 302 303 GeoTechniques (3 cr) from Geology minor. Replace with ES 301 Petrographic Microscopy (2 cr) and ES 302 Quantitative Methods (2 cr). Refer to justification statement above in Earth Science Major for rationale for making this change.
 Increase number of credit hours for minor from 27 to 28 to accommodate the course change in hours. While the number of credit hours will increase by one, the total number of courses required to complete this minor will decrease by one.

The administrative routing sheets and request forms for the proposed curriculum changes are attached.

Minutes 5-13-08

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Minutes 24 February 2008

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Faculty Senate Minutes
Western Oregon University
Tuesday, February 24th, 2009 @ 3:30
Columbia Room, Werner University Center


I. Call to order and roll call 3:30

In Attendance: Scott Beaver, Roy Bennett, Mark Perlman for Susan Daniel, Sue Dauer, Cheryl Davis, Bryan Dutton, David Foster, Mark Girod, Bob Hautala, Shaun Huston,or Elaina Jamieson, Klay Kruczek, Elisa Maroney, David Murphy, Kent Neely, Joe Peng, Dana Ulveland, Jason Waite, Peggy Pedersen, Katherine Schmidt, Joe Harchenko

II. Corrections and approval of minutes from February 10th, 2009 meeting
Action: Minutes approved with minor corrections.

III. Reports of the presidents

Faculty Senate President, Mark Girod's Report

In executive session,
I. Approved course description changes to MUS 418 and MUS 518.
II. Chair of curriculum committee, Lori Burton, has suggested that we re-examine the description of what qualifies a course for a "D" designation. Executive committee will bring a proposal to the Senate as to how this might unfold.
III. Emily Plec will convene the members of the Faculty Senate Awards Committee in an attempt to ensure that we are best meeting the wishes of contributing families and faculty senate.


President's report, Provost Neely for John Minahan:

Senator Hass has introduced Senate Bill 442 to the legislature, a bill that is meant to investigate the possibility of consolidating the regional institutions of higher education with other existing state universities. President Minahan took the initiative of contacting senator Hass last week and personally delivered a letter to the office of Senator Hass. The principle point in the letter was that Western Oregon University has distinguished itself as a unique university within the Oregon University System (by overcoming considerable financial challenges and continuing to demonstrate momentum in fulfilling a unique mission) and is distinct from the other universities that have been identified as being regional Because of our success, we should not be looked at as part of the problem nor should we be looked at as part of the solution for other campuses.

WOU continues to do very well in attracting students and admitting students. Compared to last year, we have improved by over 14% in the number of students who have applied for admission at Western. Of those who have applied, we have had 33% who are admitted. We have also had tremendous success in increasing our Hispanic student applications by 36% and increasing our admissions by 65%. We have also had great success in retaining students transitioning from freshman to sophomore.

We have maximized revenue through our retention efforts, through additional recruitment of traditional students, through our new minority recruitment plan, and the continuing recruitment of international students.

Regarding program changes: Program changes should only be brought forward if there is a very clear and persuasive case that can be made regarding retention, recruitment, access, or minimizing expenses.

David McDonald gave a brief summary of yesterday's reading: The panel is aware that we are dealing with a $3 plus billion deficit in terms of the next biennium. The committee is looking for the university system to be part of the solution. Our failure to do so will empower them to make decisions on our behalf. It will be necessary to consider what is best for students.

Mark Weiss also stated: On February 19th, the governor announced furloughs, salary freezes, and some salary rollbacks for state government, Chancellor's office, and the offices of the university presidents. This will be discussed at the next board meeting.
The expected financial impact is a $9 million reduction this year for OUS--$443,000 of that is directly attributable to Western. Consequently, we reduced our appropriation by $443,000. With the additional reduction of about $800 million of revenue shortfall this year, the Oregon university system is being asked to take another $37 million reduction, translating to approximately $1.8 million for WOU. Our expected fund balance for the end of this year is about 12%. We expect the reductions for next biennium to be $4 million per year--that represents 20 % less than the funding level we got from the state in the 07-09 biennium and approx 30% below what we consider to be our essential budget level.

We're in the process now of beginning to put together our next year's budget. We expect our enrollment to remain even. We think a 7% to 9% increase in tuition for the new cohort of students entering the university next year may be necessary. We will have an increase in remission levels. A salary freeze will likely be essential for the next biennium, as will some reduction in S and S bugets.

Staff Senate, Jennifer Hansen's Report
No report

ASWOU, Max Beach's Report
No report

Provost Kent Neely's Report
No report Provosts' Council will meet next week.

IV. Old Business

Request to establish 800 course numbers: JoNan LeRoy Director for DEP

It was proposed that WOU define 800 Professional Development numbers.

Action: Senate unanimously approved to endorse the establishment of 800-level Professional Development course numbers.


Graduate Studies: Linda Stonecipher, Director of Graduate Studies

Proposed: a conditional admission proposal for graduate language requirement. The main intent of this policy is to create an educational environment that emphasizes English language development that will provide international students with the necessary foundation for graduate-level coursework.

Changes to the proposal:
Page 2, Policy Log;
IELTS log will be 6.0 rather than 6.5;
Page 3 part C "During the year of conditional admission" is changed to "During conditional admission";
Page 3 part C #2, "receive at least a B- on all coursework" will be made more explicit by indicating that "all coursework" means "each course"

Action: Senate unanimously approved the proposal with the corrections as noted.

Military Science: Colonel Susuico

Proposal for MS 118 designated as an LACC class.

Action: Senate unanimously agreed to table action on this proposal until the March 10th meeting.

Revised Sports Leadership Minor: Marita Cardinal

Three changes are proposed:

1) Change in language for the elective course options from: "Choose three credits
total from coaching classes and /or practicum" to "Choose six credits of sport- or
coaching-related courses and/or coaching practicum, with advisor approval."

2) Increase the credit hours from 2 to 3 for PE 361.

3) Add PE 420: Motor Learning for Coaches as an alternative to Regular Motor Learning.

Action: Senate unanimously approved the proposed Sports Leadership Minor changes.

Theater Arts: Michael Philips

Proposed: a number of small curricular changes and corrections to theater degree programs. Additional classes are added to fill curricular holes and to better align the program with the National Association of Schools of Theater (NAST). Changes do not alter the total number of required credits for each degree.

Action: Senate unanimously approved the Theater Arts proposed changes.

Graphic Design: Diane Tarter

Proposed title changes for some of the existing courses and three new courses. The
three added courses (Digital Design A423, A424, A425) will run parallel to the
Print Design sequence. The new courses provide more options for graphic design
students. Students may choose to take one or both of the 400 level sequences after
completing all prerequisites in art foundations, introductory 200 level courses, and
the 300 level year-long sequence. This flexible choice option fits within the 84
credits required in the art major. This addition is proposed in order to align WOU's
art program with current practices and university offerings in the state, our region,
and the nation.

Action: Senate unanimously approved the proposed changes to the Graphic Design program.


Music: Joe Harchenko

New course proposal: MUS 404 Junior Seminar. In order for us to be more in line with other institutions, a zero credit-hour requirement that would be passed upon successful completion of the capstone project.

Action: Senate unanimously approved the new course proposal.

V. New Business

No new business

VI. Additional Reports and Items

Office of Institutional research and sponsored projects report

Action: Senate agreed to table this report and discussion until our March meeting.

VII. Meeting Adjourned

5:00

Minutes 11-13-07

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Minutes 23 May 2000

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 Please note: These minutes are still going to the 99/00 senate
members only who are on the senate distribution list. I will have a
new distribution list by the next meeting. Please share this
information with your senate replacements until I get things fixed.
Of note: the summer meeting time (July 11, 3:30 tentative). Sarah 


Faculty Senate Meeting Minutes 

Tuesday, May 23, 2000 

Columbia Room, Werner University Center 



1.0 Call to Order 



2.0 Call of the Roll: 

There were three substitutions: Bryan Dutton

for Irja Galvan, Mark Perlman for Dean Bethea, and Hamid

Behmard for Mike Ward. Several new-term senators were present

but I didn't put new nametags out for them so there was no formal

roll for them. The following old-term senators were absent: Brian

Bonnlander, Meredith Brodsky, Brian Caster, Tina Fuchs,

Wangeshi Gatimu, Rebecca Marsh-McCannell, lMing Chi-Own,

Darryl Thomas, and Stephanie Tunison were absent. 



3.0. Corrections to and approval of the minutes from the previous

senate meeting/Agenda Adjustments. Minutes approved. There

were no agenda adjustments. 



4.0. Reports of the Presidents 



4.1 Senate President


Joel thanked the senate for an "active year," and the faculty who

have joined the Scholars' Network. He hopes to be an active

advisor for the Executive Committee next year. 



4.2 President of Western Oregon University


President Youngblood was not present. 



4.21 Budget: 

Provost Minahan gave an extensive budget

presentation and, along with Dean Chadney, answered a variety of

questions. To accompany his presentations, Provost Minahan

distributed three hand-outs: (1) the budget report (to all senators);

(2) the Legislative Fiscal Office's memorandum on the impact of

the pending Sizemore initiative (to all senators); and (3) a

summary of reports about academic ownership/intellectual property

rights (limited copies; Joel has master copies).


Only the budget report was extensively reviewed. Key points:

freshman are presently up 6.1%; transfers up 12.0%, and

graduates down 43.8%. Total: up 5.4%. The Provost stressed

that these figures typically decrease and we should view next year

as potentially "flat" and "tender." The Provost also explained that

we will be giving back $781,560 based on not exceeding annual

projections. All these figures are in the handout provided.


Initial comments from the Provost included the following:


(a) Given the completion of the library, a larger push to build

Foundation funds for scholarships will be made next year as it

seems that other state universities are using small scholarships to

most effectively recruit students.


(b) He predicts a 3.5% tuition increase that will defray costs next

year. He said that the state could mandate up to 5% tuition

increases. Nevertheless, given recent negotiations, an increase of

200 FTE students needs to be met next year even with projected

tuition increases.


(c) New lab fees for courses in the Natural Sciences Division

will, in part, supplement the existing science budget.


(d) A breakdown of where there have been specific gains and

losses in students in particular programs will be available soon.


(e) Certain programs may be cut (the Japanese minor was

specifically mentioned) or altered. For example, the Provost and

the Dean expressed interest in expanding the current MAT to

students who have recently completed specific BA/BS degrees

when asked about this topic (given the fact that the current MAT is

competitive and fully enrolled).


(f) Both the Dean and the Provost stated that faculty positions

may also be altered given retirements (it was not stated whether

this would be limited to Divisions or not). For example, a retiring

member of "X" could be replaced by a "Y" (I wasn't about to specify

programs - and neither was anyone else).


(g) The Provost hopes to make budget reports a quarterly event. 



4.3 Student Body President


The new Student Body President, Andy High, introduced himself

and his new platform, which includes educating students about the

impact of the Sizemore initiative, improving the student weight

training facilities, and developing a women's center on campus. 



5.0 Consideration of Old Business 



5.1 On-Line Course Routing Form: Joel is still waiting for more

input on these drafts. 



5.2 WRC ad-hoc committee. 

The motion to form a committee to

investigate membership in the WRC was unanimously approved.

Peter Callero will head this committee and faculty interested in

working with Peter should contact him. 



6.0 Consideration of New Business 



6.1 Elections. 

The following nominees were elected:

John Leadley (President) - all but one (John Leadley) approved

Janeanne Rockwell-Kincanon (V. President) - unanimous

Sarah Boomer (Secretary) - unanimous

David Hargreaves - (EC member at large) - unanimous 



7.0 Reports of Interinstitutional Faculty Senators: None 



8.0 Reports 



8.1 Academic Requirements: 

Joel read a report from Solveig

Holmquist, Chair of the ARC, that summarized the primary item of

the committee - evaluation of writing course requirements at

Western. Copies were not distributed and will be maintained in my

(secretary) file. Major conclusions:


(a) Many Western students are weak writers but, unfortunately,

skip taking WR115, a basic writing course, because it does not

fulfill the LACC; WR115 is not a formal pre-requisite for WR135, an

analytical/argument-based expository writing course (and LACC).

There are presently not enough faculty to teach WR115 to the

numbers of students estimated to need it. Students are given a

writing "entrance/evaluation exam" as part of SOAR but, at

present, decisions about placement are not required (only

advised) using results.


(b) Writing Intensive Courses are poorly designated and

standardized. Their effectiveness is not well understood. Some

programs offer no WI courses.


Discussion of these issues, both by ARC and Faculty Senate,

yielded the following recommendations:


(a) Put more resources into faculty to teach 115 and 135


(b) Require/enforce that every major offer at least one WI course


(c) Improve listing WI in schedule; specifically, make a separate

"WI class" listing within each schedule. Put this information on the

web as well.


(d) Make SOAR writing evaluations into true placement tests and

use them for placing students into either 115 or 135.


(e) The Senate briefly courted the motion of requiring that a C in

WR135 be mandatory for passing; after discussion, however, it

was decided that this be discussed further as "new business" at

the next meeting (July 11, 3:30, pending further notice).


(f) Develop improved mechanisms for evaluating WI courses; this

was recommended by ARC but no specific ideas were generated at

Faculty Senate. 



8.2 Curriculum Committee: None 



8.3 Graduate Study Committee: None 



8.4 Honors Committee: 

Marjorie summarized this years' activities,

including moving thesis timeline earlier, Pastega Award recipients,

the Ashland excursion, and the development of an Honors Center

in the Old Library. 



8.5 International Education/Services Committee: 

John

summarized this years' activities. In sum, 246 liberal arts/sciences

majors and 94 education majors participated in study abroad

programs in, in descending order of popularity, Europe, Americas,

Asia, and Africa. Programs included national, local, and campus-

based trips for 1-3 months. He encouraged faculty to consider

teaching abroad as well, and discussed examples from faculty

here. He emphasized that, while students and faculty participating

in overseas experiences is not a big money-maker for campus, it

should be supported and encouraged in the context of our liberal

arts philosophy and education values. He discussed the impact of

international students on campus (primarily Japanese students at

present), emphasizing their cultural and financial impact on

campus. He also asked that faculty be sensitive to the special

needs of these students. The proposed cutting of the Japanese

minor was discussed in light of all of these issues. 



8.6 Academic Information Committee: None 



8.7 Jenson Lectureship Committee: Janeann is now taking

suggestions for next years' speakers. 



8.8 Honor Code Committee: None. 



The Meeting was adjourned.


Corrections:



Faculty Senate:


Carol Harding made three important corrections, the first of which


has bearing on the upcoming July meeting.


(1) Relevent for New Business/Writing Courses: The grade of C-


(not a C, as stated incorrectly in the minutes) is the proposed


passing grade for WR135 (the LACC requirement).


(2) The SOAR writing test will be a pilot program beginning this


year; it has not been implemented before.


(3) Mike Ward was also elected to Executive Committee.



 


Minutes 9 May 2000

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 Tuesday, May 9, 

3:30 p.m.
Columbia Room 


1.0 Call to Order 


2.0 Call of the Roll: 

There were three substitutions: Maureen
Dolan for Chehallis Strapp, Kevin Helppie for Judy Bullington, and
Mark Perlman for Dean Bethea. The following senators were
absent: Stephanie Tunison, Laura Riolli-Saltzman, Bryan Dutton
(who was scheduled to substitute for Irja Galvan), Tina Fuchs,
Meredith Brodsky, and Brian Bonnlander. 


3.0. Corrections to and approval of the minutes from the previous
senate meeting/Agenda Adjustments. Minutes approved. There
were no agenda adjustments. 


4.0. Reports of the Presidents 


4.1 Senate President

Joel welcomed new senators and reminded them to be present for
the vote regarding Executive Committee members, two positions of
which are "non-officer." Joel also thanked faculty input for the OUS
Scholars Network and said there were close to thirty Western
faculty participants. He solicited additional input for non-Western-
affiliated IRB panel members. He is still collecting on-line routing
form comments. 


4.2 President of Western Oregon University

President Youngblood said there was no report. 


4.3 Student Body President

Obie Garza summarized Diversity Month activities - including the
new Diversity Achievement Awards which went to Kim Jensen and
Leo Rasca-Hidalgo. He also mentioned the recent student
Leadership Awards and his hope that the Chican@ studies minor
would be resolved. He announced the new student president's
platform includes continuing diversity issues, developing a women's
center, and improving the weight-training facilities. 


5.0 Consideration of Old Business 


5.1 Chican@ studies minor. Please consider handouts provided
by the Division of Social Sciences regarding their position on the
minor. Also, a secondary handout that summarizes all courses for
the minor was provided at the meeting. The minor includes a 12-credit
core of
classes with "Chican@" in the title plus a more broad choice of
electives (students would choose 12 credits from electives).

I will attempt to briefly summarize major points of discussion as
this portion of the meeting lasted approximately 90 minutes. At some
point
during this period, one meeting extension was approved.

Prior to this meeting, the multi-disciplinary "Chican@ studies"
minor was unanimously passed by Education and Humanities.
Social Science, however, wanted to broaden the minor name to
"Chican@/Latin@ studies" in order to reflect their comparative and
more broad philosophy of evaluating and discussing groups of
people. It was further argued that breadth was more suited to (a)
the campus ideals; (b) the general issue of diversity; and (c)
attracting and including more students in the program.
Roshani presented a compromise that Social Science, the
Curriculum Committee, and the Registrar decided upon at the prior
week's Curriculum Committee meeting: to allow a student to "fill
in" either "Chican@" or "Chican@/Latin@" at graduation; they
could, within the context of the broad elective component of the
minor, tailor coursework to either Chican@ or broad
Chican@/Latin@ studies. Students involved in the minor had
tentatively agreed to this compromise, albeit only last-minute.

Initial criticism to this compromise came from visiting students and
faculty and eventually included more faculty senate and
administration discussion. Statements included that this minor, as
originally titled, reflected the minority student population in the
region and on campus and thus should remain "Chican@" because
of identity and heritage issues. Second, it was felt that the
"Chican@" was at the root of every core course within the minor
and altering the name on the basis of elective offerings may
mislead students pursuing the minor. Third, it was felt that, while
the minor core courses were specific, the ideals of breadth,
diversity, and cultural context were maintained by the electives -
and thus did not violate campus philosophy.

Rebuttle arguments came primarily from Social Sciences faculty
and involved, again, comparative approaches and
what it means to be a "multidisciplinary minor." The role/duty of
Faculty Senate in "mandating" this name/program was also
questioned. It was also suggested that some faculty may only
teach elective courses for the minor if the Chican@/Latin@
designation was used because of concerns that minor students
would expect otherwise broad courses to be taught more
specifically (either that or they would be less motivated/interested
in broad issues). Thus, the issue of academic freedom was
broached. Several faculty said this was illogical because the point
of the electives was to add breadth. Several faculty also shared
experiences with teaching or developing broad elective courses for
multidisciplinary minors.

A move to approve the original Chican@ title was made. The
motion passed by 13 to 5. It was next moved to allow Social
Science faculty to reconsider keeping their courses in the minor.
This was unanimously passed. Social Science has one week to
consider pulling out certain courses from the new Chican@ minor.
Student guests thanked the senate for their decision and asked
that Social Science please keep their broad courses in the existing
minor. 


6.0 New Business.

Carl distributed a summary of a proposal that WOU join Workers'
Rights Association. This item should be discussed with your
division. It will appear as old business at the next senate meeting. 


7.0 Reports of the Interinstitutional Faculty Senators:

Bob Turner briefly summarized the recent IFS meeting: key points
included the upcoming Sizemore and McIntyre initiatives and the
aforementioned Scholars' Network. 


8.0 Reports of the Faculty Senate Sub-Committees

No substantial reports were given. 


The meeting was adjourned.


Minutes 25 April 2000

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 Tuesday, April 25, 

3:30 p.m.
Columbia Room 

1.0 Call to Order 


2.0 Call of the Roll: 

There was one substitution: Bryan Dutton for Irja
Galvan.
The following senators were absent: Dean Bethea, Brian Bonnlander,
Meredith
Brodsky, Tina Fuchs, Stephanie Tunison, and Wangeshi Gatimu. 


3.0. Corrections to and approval of the minutes from the previous
senate meeting/Agenda Adjustments. Minutes approved. There
were no agenda adjustments. 


4.0. Reports of the Presidents 


4.1 Senate President 




4.11 Joel reminded all senators that new senator positions must be
decided by the next meeting. New senator information can be
provided to Joel (alexanj@wou.edu) or Sarah (boomers@wou.edu).
New senators are required to come with old senators to the May 9
meeting. 


4.12 Executive Committee elections will take place
May 23. The nominating committee for this committee will be
decided upon after all new senate positions have been determined.
While the role of the vice president has not changed for the next
academic year, it has been discussed that we may want to
incorporate faculty senate webpage maintenance into his/her
duties and take that up formally next year. 


4.13 Joel reminded senators of the recent email detailing all
Executive Committee-approved course approvals. 


4.14 Joel requested input/suggestions for an outside non-research,
non-WOU-affiliated member to serve on the IRB committee, the
federal grant-mandated committee on campus that oversees
research involving human subjects. 


4.15 Joel reminded senators that course change forms REQUIRE
Ed. Media and library signatures so that potential course impact on
these resources may be communicated. 


4.16 The W and D designated course issue remains in limbo until
the ARC can present more exact findings. Joel hoped that their
long-awaited report would take place at the next meeting. 




4.2 President of Western Oregon University

President Youngblood said the budget report will be on next month's
agenda.
There was no further report.

President Youngblood and Provost Minahan were asked about
whether the catalog would be 1, 2, or 4 year and much discussion
ensued. Provost Minahan noted the large cost (approx. 40K) of
publishing new catalogs, although noted that many are handed out
as recruiting tools (and the true effectiveness of this is not known).
While he commended the obvious curriculum development going
on, he hoped that faculty would recognize the need for a long-term
catalog and understand that not every change needed to go into
catalogs (sub-catalog information provided within departments, for
example, could suffice over some periods of time). Joel asked
whether a "mini-catalog" that was less expensive to produce could
be written to solve the problem of using the expensive catalog as a
recruiting tool. The Provost said this was under consideration. 


4.3 Student Body President

Obie Garza was not present. 


5.0 Consideration of Old Business 


5.1 The new "on-line routing form" was discussed, with some differences
in
opinion. Some senators believed that there should be an
intermediate form that addressed courses that were both "in-load"
and "self-sustained." Some senators believed that additional
information about "financial issues" or needs should be addressed
in the form. Other senators had no problem with the existing form.
Specific comments should be sent to Joel and he will assimilate all
comments for another review. An ancillary discussion of how the
"eCollege" training for the on-line MAT was had. Senators
involved in this training discussed pitfalls with software and
hardware, the huge time commitment, and the necessary learning
curve that will have to take place. 


5.2 New Masters in School Counseling. The presentation about
this new degree highlighted state employment needs for School
Counselors and the unique disability emphasis this degree would
offer in comparison with degrees at other institutes. Primary
discussion involved questions about FTE (2 will be added) and
comments from Provost Minahan indicating that this may be tough
to approve beyond campus because OSU has a comparable degree (that
ironically originated from WOU when we ran a joint education program
years ago). The faculty senate approved the new degree program. 


6.0 Consideration of New Business: none 


7.0 Reports of the Interinstitutional Faculty Senators: none 


8.0 Reports of Faculty Senate Sub-Committees 


8.1 Academic Requirements: None 


8.2 Curriculum Committee: 

Brian reminded everyone that next meeting
will be May 16. 


8.3 Graduate Study Committee: None 


8.4 Honors Committee: None 


8.5 International Education/Services Committee: None 


8.6 Academic Information Committee: None 


8.7 Jenson Lectureship Committee: 

Janeann reminded everyone
about the upcoming spring lectureship - now two weeks away. 


8.8 Honor Code Committee: Kim Jensen discussed the progress the
committee had made this year (based on the report handed out at
the last meeting). She pointed out perceptions that there should
be a "shift in culture" on campus to one of academic honesty,
pointing out student support for more guidance and awareness
when it comes to these issues. Other committee members
present described specific ideas, including more faculty orientation
on the topic (particularly for new faculty), encouraging all faculty to
"read the existing rules" at the beginning of classes in the fall, and
actually having students sign awareness statements. Some
discussion ensued about potential legal issues involved, although it
was pointed out that students enter into a contract via enrolling that
assumes they know about the existing code which is, in itself, part
of the contract. Some senators felt more student orientation
activities need to take place so that that awareness was made early.
Some senators felt we should be careful to emphasis "honesty" not
"dishonesty" in the language of any codes being considered. After
lengthy discussion, it was moved that the committee be continued next
year and charged with the task of defining specific measures to address
these issues and, in the long term, defining the most appropriate "code"
for this campus. This motion was approved. 


The Meeting was adjourned.


Minutes 11 April 2000

| No Comments

Special Senate Meeting: Martin Morris Presentation/On-Line
Curriculum Grant Information 

March 14, 2000 

Columbia Room, 3:30 p.m. 

1. Call to Order. 


2. Call of the Roll. 

Lowell Spring was present on behalf of Irja
Galvan. The following individuals were not present: Dean Bethea,
Judy Bullington, Ming-Chi Own, Tina Fuchs, Wangeshi Gatimu,
David Hargreaves, Linda Keller, Rebecca March-McCannell, Donna
Perry, Janeanne Rockwell-Kincanon, Stephanie Tunison, and Mike
Ward were absent. Several guests, both administrative and from
the School of Education, were present. 


3. Presentation from Martin Morris and Discussion.

This is a hopefully brief and general overview of what was an
informative 90 minute combined presentation and question/answer
session. The object of the meeting was to inform. No specific
votes or motions were taken. For additional information, please
review original materials about this grant and intellectual property
rights provided earlier via email. Some key points:

(a) The LAAP Grant is funded through OUS and eCollege, with
OUS funds supporting assessment and salary and eCollege money
for technology (server, laptops, and software) and training-related
travel stipends. OUS funding accounts for nearly twice the amount
provided via eCollege. "Ownership" of on-line converted materials
still remains somewhat "muddy" and, as recommended by Martin,
should remain a point of discussion as this campus becomes more
involved in both the internet and in grant-supported curriculum.
Likewise, general issues regarding copyrights and intellectual
ownership, academic freedom, and the appropriateness of on-line
courses for particular disciplines should remain a topic of discourse.

(b) The specific cohort target for these funds consists of
transitional teachers in the classroom who have a bachelors degree
in their content area but still need formal licensure. Such
transitional teachers have three years to obtain their licenses.
There are approximately 126 transitional teachers working in the
state and this program hopes to recruit 25. During involvement in
the on-line version of this MAT, masters students will have a
classroom mentor. Several questions were discussed regarding
student access not only to hard/software but also to weekend
contact with professors. In addition to on-line materials, it was
also suggested that video/audio presentations were being persued.
This program has been accredited. There will also be an additional
cohort involving special education.

(c) As indicated by Martin and several School of Education faculty
present, the implementation of the transitional license/MAT
program for its summer debut is proceeding on schedule. Current
faculty have now been scheduled for summer on-line courses and
will be involved in conversion/course preparataion this spring. OUS
funds will cover salary for extra preparation time (approximately
$1500 per faculty) and eCollege money is supporting laptops (PC
or Macs loaded with necessary software) and training for those
faculty involved in the conversion process. All faculty will receiving
regular FTE for on-line courses (i.e. entirely comparable to non-on-
line format equivalent classes).

(d) In terms of grant submission/approval protocol issues, Martin
noted that it was unfortunate this grant was available over a
matter of days and submitted without, indeed, more faculty input.
He and the Provost spoke on the need for improved mechanisms
for monitering and managing grant submissions on this campus. In
particular, grants requiring matching funds (historically, anywhere
between 5-100K) may need more formal scrutiny (e.g. via a
committee). However, it seems even more imperative, should such
a committee evolve, that all grants be prepared and
submitted in a timely and organized fashion if they are to be
reviewed properly and meet deadlines.

(e) The last major point I will highlight regarded the question
Faculty Senate was asked to consider when this issue was
originally brought forth: "Does an 'on-line' version of a class require
a course change/curriculum committee approval?" The Provost
suggested that the essence of a course lies not in the catalog
description but in the syllabus. Thus, even though a catalog
description usually does become altered if an on-line version
becomes available, the essence of the course - as defined by the
syllabus - should not change. 


After lengthy discussions, the meeting was adjourned.

Have a great spring break!


Minutes 14 March 2000

| No Comments

Special Senate Meeting: Martin Morris Presentation/On-Line
Curriculum Grant Information 

March 14, 2000 

Columbia Room, 3:30 p.m. 

1. Call to Order. 


2. Call of the Roll. 

Lowell Spring was present on behalf of Irja
Galvan. The following individuals were not present: Dean Bethea,
Judy Bullington, Ming-Chi Own, Tina Fuchs, Wangeshi Gatimu,
David Hargreaves, Linda Keller, Rebecca March-McCannell, Donna
Perry, Janeanne Rockwell-Kincanon, Stephanie Tunison, and Mike
Ward were absent. Several guests, both administrative and from
the School of Education, were present. 


3. Presentation from Martin Morris and Discussion.

This is a hopefully brief and general overview of what was an
informative 90 minute combined presentation and question/answer
session. The object of the meeting was to inform. No specific
votes or motions were taken. For additional information, please
review original materials about this grant and intellectual property
rights provided earlier via email. Some key points:

(a) The LAAP Grant is funded through OUS and eCollege, with
OUS funds supporting assessment and salary and eCollege money
for technology (server, laptops, and software) and training-related
travel stipends. OUS funding accounts for nearly twice the amount
provided via eCollege. "Ownership" of on-line converted materials
still remains somewhat "muddy" and, as recommended by Martin,
should remain a point of discussion as this campus becomes more
involved in both the internet and in grant-supported curriculum.
Likewise, general issues regarding copyrights and intellectual
ownership, academic freedom, and the appropriateness of on-line
courses for particular disciplines should remain a topic of discourse.

(b) The specific cohort target for these funds consists of
transitional teachers in the classroom who have a bachelors degree
in their content area but still need formal licensure. Such
transitional teachers have three years to obtain their licenses.
There are approximately 126 transitional teachers working in the
state and this program hopes to recruit 25. During involvement in
the on-line version of this MAT, masters students will have a
classroom mentor. Several questions were discussed regarding
student access not only to hard/software but also to weekend
contact with professors. In addition to on-line materials, it was
also suggested that video/audio presentations were being persued.
This program has been accredited. There will also be an additional
cohort involving special education.

(c) As indicated by Martin and several School of Education faculty
present, the implementation of the transitional license/MAT
program for its summer debut is proceeding on schedule. Current
faculty have now been scheduled for summer on-line courses and
will be involved in conversion/course preparataion this spring. OUS
funds will cover salary for extra preparation time (approximately
$1500 per faculty) and eCollege money is supporting laptops (PC
or Macs loaded with necessary software) and training for those
faculty involved in the conversion process. All faculty will receiving
regular FTE for on-line courses (i.e. entirely comparable to non-on-
line format equivalent classes).

(d) In terms of grant submission/approval protocol issues, Martin
noted that it was unfortunate this grant was available over a
matter of days and submitted without, indeed, more faculty input.
He and the Provost spoke on the need for improved mechanisms
for monitering and managing grant submissions on this campus. In
particular, grants requiring matching funds (historically, anywhere
between 5-100K) may need more formal scrutiny (e.g. via a
committee). However, it seems even more imperative, should such
a committee evolve, that all grants be prepared and
submitted in a timely and organized fashion if they are to be
reviewed properly and meet deadlines.

(e) The last major point I will highlight regarded the question
Faculty Senate was asked to consider when this issue was
originally brought forth: "Does an 'on-line' version of a class require
a course change/curriculum committee approval?" The Provost
suggested that the essence of a course lies not in the catalog
description but in the syllabus. Thus, even though a catalog
description usually does become altered if an on-line version
becomes available, the essence of the course - as defined by the
syllabus - should not change. 


After lengthy discussions, the meeting was adjourned.

Have a great spring break!


Minutes 22 February 2000

| No Comments

Faculty Senate Meeting 

Tuesday, February 22, 

3:30 p.m.

Columbia Room 


1.0 Call to Order 



2.0 Call of the Roll: 

Meredith Brodsky, Judy Bullington, Brian Caster,

Wangeshi Gatimu, David Hargreaves, Stephanie Tunison, Tina Fuchs,
Ming-Chi Own, and Martin Rodriguez-Perez were absent.


3.0. Corrections to and approval of the minutes from the previous senate
meeting/Agenda Adjustments. 

Minutes approved. There were no
agenda adjustments. 



4.0. Reports of the Presidents 



4.1. Senate President 

Joel discussed several Executive Committee
actions regarding
recently approved course changes or additons. He then summarized
impressions of his recent trip to the OUS Board meeting/rally at
Eugene. In particular, he noted several fine speeches made by
speakers and the large press received. He (and the faculty senate)
acknowledged Dr. Youngblood for declining a salary increase until
faculty salary decisions are resolved.


Joel (with input and further mention from/by Drs. Youngblood and
Minahan) discussed recently approved faculty spouse/dependent
benefits. In sum, these two-year trial benefits include 10 free hours of
study per term at any state institute.


Joel (also with input and further mention from/by Drs. Youngblood and
Chadney) discussed the approval of the new Anthropology degree.


Joel next encouraged the Faculty to begin thinking about new Faculty
Senate positions that will be open next year, including Executive
Committee Members and the Faculty Senate President. Elections should
begin in April. Joel said that our next meeting may not be until March 28
- although, he hinted, we may want/need to call a special meeting for
March 14th (and, indeed, see end of minutes - a special meeting was
approved for the 14th).


Finally, Joel summarized some OUS-raised issues regarding on-line
course development that would also be a focus of new business. In
particular, he noted that concerns had been raised regarding appropriate
FTE/overloading, not being able to meet with students (although he
suggested that Saturday meeting times were allowed and encouraged),
and expectations built into already approved OUS grants (which bring
into question issues of academic freedom, 'ownership' of curriculum, and
grant-writing protocol that involve major curriculum or program
changes). 



4.2 President of Western Oregon University 


Dr. Youngblood reiterated the new trial spouse/dependent benefits, the
Anthropology degree, and spoke briefly on the recent issue of 'arming'
campus security - which has been raised by PSU. She emphasized that a
decision on this issue would require several steps through the
Leglislature and OUS Board and that PSU was the primary impact site for
these decisions. Finally, Dr. Youngblood mentioned that a Title III grant
has been revised and submitted; this could provide 1.7 million dollars
over 5 years for improving technology, teaching, and learning on
campus. 


4.3 Student Body President 


Obie Garza reiterated ongoing plans to bring the Governor to campus and
educate students about voting (with an emphasis on the Sizemore
initiative). He noted that April is Diversity Month and briefly

summarized several planned events. He said that the new Chicano
studies minor will probably be approved in the spring. 



5.0 Reports of the Interinstitutional Faculty Senators: 


Irja Galvan summarized the recent February 4/5 meeting, which included a
discussion of the aforementioned crime/arming campus security issue
and an information-gathering session that compared salary gains by
different campuses. She emphasized that the new Legislature will have a
great deal of turnover this year (due to new term limits) and said IFS
encourages faculty to inform new members of the Legislature about what
it really means to be a university professor. She encouraged faculty to
read the minutes of that meeting, which are posted on the IFS website
(which is linked to our Faculty Senate website). 



6.0 Reports of Faculty Senate Sub-Committees: 


Joel briefly went down the list of sub-committees, mentioning a few
items. These included the following: Academic Requirements will be
meeting shortly to discuss the Writing Intensive course requirements.
Both the Graduate and the Curriculum Committee role in on-line course
approval will/may be a big issue on the horizon (see new business).
Janeanne spoke on behalf of the Jenson Lecture Committee, informing us
that next year's topic, World Peace, has been decided based on 'piggy-
backing' onto a planned conference in Portland. She hopes to bring at
least one major Nobel Laureate onto campus and seeks input from
Faculty on this matter. Laura also spoke on behalf on the Honor Code
Committee, saying that they would have their formal report by the next
meeting. 



7.0 Consideration of Old Business: 

None. 



8.0 Consideration of New Business: 



8.1 Bylaws Changes: 

Please review the email provided by Carol Harding
to read the specifics (briefly: moving new and old business after the
Reports of the Presidents, and requiring a one session wait period

between new proposals and consideration/voting). Carol spoke briefly
on the rationale for these proposals, indicating that the former will take
effect as early as Spring, 2000 and the latter in Fall, 2000. There was
some discussion but no vote. Faculty Senators, mirroring the theme of
proposal two, are encouraged to take these issues back to their Divisions
before formal consideration and a vote next time.


Joel mentioned that he and the Executive Committee have broached
several other potential Bylaw changes one of which, importantly, was
changing the role of the Vice President to include maintenance of the
Faculty Senate webpage. 



8.2 On-line Course/Program Development: 

This contentious issue was
raised and discussed at some length. Essentially, what is purported is
the following: a grant was written by Martin Morris (Director of
Extended Studies) to develop an entirely on-line curriculum/program (to
be up and running by Fall,

2000) that would be aimed at a cohort of working/distant classroom
teachers seeking advanced degrees/licensure. Monies were requested
via OUS and a corporation called "eCollege." The problem appears to be
that a limited number of actual faculty were consulted or informed of the
grant contents and they are now finding out about the grant
expectations and questioning several potential problems (timeframe,
appropriateness of on-line format, course/program change, and
accreditation, to name a few). Subsequent issues that have risen from
these discussions have involved, as mentioned before, academic
freedom, 'ownership' of curriculum, money/grant-driven curriculum, and
proper protocol for writing such a grant and approving
courses/programs. Martin Morris was not on hand to answer faculty
concerns, although Provost Minahan assured faculty that a significant
brake had been made in terms of heavily advertising this new program in
light of concerns. Joel has distributed an email from Martin Morris
summarizing grant issues. Following discussion, the Faculty Senate
approved a special meeting to formally discuss these issues with Martin
Morris on March 14th, provided he is available. 



The Meeting was adjourned.


Minutes 25 January 2000

| No Comments

Faculty Senate Meeting

Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2000

Columbia Room

1.0     Call to Order

2.0     Call of the Roll.  Meredith Brodsky,
Tina Fuchs, Martin

Rodriquez, Linda Stonecipher, and Stephanie Tunison were absent.

3.0     Previous minutes and meeting/Agenda Adjustments.

Minutes were approved.  No agenda adjustments.

4.0     Reports of the Presidents:

4.1  Senate President:  Joel summarized major senate events
from

fall term, 1999 (Diversity, Honor Code/Committee, Budget, and

PEBB).  He introduced Eric Cooley, the new Faculty Athletic

Representative (FAR) for NCAA.  He said that Eric would bring

forth Attendance Policy issues in the near future.  He

announced that the Faculty Senate now has webspace which

he, Chehalis, and I will continue to build.

Joel reminded faculty to review the list of Executive Committee-

approved curriculum changes that was provided prior to the

meeting and then reiterated the Faculty Senate's advisory role in

terms of curriculum issues (as precisely defined by the Senate

by-laws).  This statement was in response to Social Sciences'

request that the Curriculum Committee be changed to represent

the entire campus.  Joel discussed the fact that there are no

clear by-laws which define when the Executive Committee must

take specific curriculum issues to the entire senate;  decisions

are at the discretion of the Executive Committee members.  In
his

experience, however, new majors, major overhauls, or

contentious changes were always brought forth to the Faculty

Senate which, by definition, represents the entire campus (thus

making moot concerns about the current structure of the

Curriculum Committee).  Joel strongly urged concerned faculty

to keep this in mind when calls for new Executive Committee

came forth.

Joel announced that he had been asked to attend to the

upcoming OUS Board of Higher Education meeting and asked

for guidance regarding the invitation.  The Senate approved his

attendance, supporting the need to have broad faculty

representation, not just union-mediated presentations.

4.2  President of Western Oregon University:  Dr. Youngblood

reported current enrollment (3% up over last year) and

announced that the Anthropology degree was approved at the

recent Strategic Planning meeting.  She described recent PEBB

discussions with the governor;  when asked about her sense of

his "feeling" on the matter, she said it was not clear.

Dr. Youngblood was asked specifically about plans for the old

library.  She described two plans:   (1)  a less
expensive short

term plan that included conversion to offices and classrooms

but no elevator;  and (2) a long-term, multi-million dollar plan

that would build facilities for admissions, advising, and the

study skills center (including an elevator).

4.3  Student Body President:  Obie Garza described work to

educate students about current legislative or judicial issues

(including the Sizemore plan, student fees, tuition freeze/hikes,

and childcare).  He said the Chicano studies minor is moving

slowly but surely through the paperwork.  Finally, he discussed

a major voter registration campaign he is leading on campus

(that could bring the governor here in the spring).  Faculty

lauded, in particular, this effort.

5.0     Reports of the Interinstitutional Faculty
Senators:

Irja introduced Bob Turner, who has now officially replaced

Marion Schrock.  Irja described the December meeting, held at

PSU.  Key issues:  (1)  new budget model problems in
terms of

poorly-defined assessment categories for students (i.e. the

"blocks" that receive additional state funding);  (2)  PSU's

specific role as an urban university with an emphasis on

funding problems when the lines between the university and

the community are blurred;  (3)  concerns about the budget

model in terms of promoting bad competition, not union;  (4)

perceptions that a new university in Bend will not be a reality

any time soon because of the funding situation; (5) discussions

of the role of faculty on OUS (with the announcement that Dr.

Geraldine Richmond, who currently holds this position, will be

visiting Western in the near future);  and (6)  IFS now has
a

website (that will be linked into the new website shortly).

6.0     Reports of the Faculty Senate Sub-Committees:

6.2     Curriculum Committee:  Brian reported
that on-line

forms for course approvals should be available on the faculty

handbook website.  He also recommended a more judicious use

and assessment of  "slash" (or 400/500) courses.  Finally,
he

and Joel warned that on-line courses (specifically, faculty credit

loading thereof) may be an upcoming topic for review in the

Curriculum Committee and, hence, Faculty Senate.

6.4     Honors Committee:  Bob Turner unofficially

announced that two junior seminars had been made for next

year.

6.8     Honor Code Committee:  Laura summarized
the first

two meetings;  topics included a comparative review of variable

division/department policies and procedures on this campus, a

discussion of why an Honor Code was being considered at this

time (increased numbers?), and a discussion of the need for

both Professor Authority, Unity, and specific tailoring to

Western's unique needs.  Obie asked about student

representation on this committee (as he missed earlier meetings

that addressed/requested student involvement).  Two students

will be selected to participate on this committee.

8.0     New Business:  Joel reminded faculty
to review

extensive handouts provided about each of these topics.

Please refer to these handouts in order to understand the

presentations and rationale behind each proposal, as I will not

describe those here.

8.1  Graduate Committee Membership.  After presentations and

a moderate discussion that included concerns about the large

committee size, faculty workload, proper balance in terms of

campus representation, and the precise role of this committee

(review vs. advising), the Faculty Senate approved expansion of

the Graduate Committee with the amendment that one member

from Elementary/Secondary Education must come from Health

and P.E (the vote was 16 to 1).  Several typos in the proposal
were

also noted.

8.2  Change in CS Major.  After presentations and discussion

that included concerns about the frequency of course offerings,

faculty numbers/hires/workload, and the entire lack of writing

intensive coursework in the major, the Faculty Senate approved

the CS major changes.

8.3  New Major in Information Technology.  After presentations

and another discussion that included concerns about the entire

lack of writing intensive or speech coursework in the major, the

Faculty Senate approved the new major.

8.4  Withdrawal of Economics from Social Science Major and

Minor.  After presentations and a clarification of the Curriculum

Committee's decision (to support the petition to withdraw), the

Faculty Senate voted to uphold the Curriculum Committee's

decision, although the vote was not unanimous (14 to 1).

8.5  Withdrawal of Economics from the LACC Social Science

requirement.  After presentations and a clarification of the

Curriculum Committee's decision (not to support withdrawal),

the Faculty Senate voted to uphold the Curriculum Committee's

decision, although the vote was not unanimous (11 to 4).

The meeting was adjourned.

 

 

Minutes 07 December 1999

| No Comments

Special/Emergency Faculty Senate Meeting 

Tuesday, December 7, 1999, 

4:00 p.m.
Willamette Room 

1.0 Call to Order 


2.0 Call of the Roll: 

Several substitutions were: Sue Hill was
present for Linda Stonecipher; Eric Cooley was present for
Chehallis Strapp; I was voting on behalf of Irja Galvan and myself.
The following members were absent: Leo Rasca-Hidalgo, Meredith
Brodsky, Brian Caster, Ming-Chi Own, Audrey Clarke, Michael
Cihak, Wangeshi Gatimu, Tina Fuchs, Stephanie Tunison, Darryl
Thomas, Laura Riolli-Saltzman, Martin Rodriguez-Perez, Jim
Chadney, Obie Garza, Provost Minahan, and President
Youngblood. 


3.0 Joel introduced the topic of the special meeting: consideration
of the draft of the "Resolution of the Faculty Senate of Western
Oregon University" regarding the current PEBB situation. Carol
Harding distributed this draft. Marion Schrock then discussed the
history and current situation. Key points:

- Current PEBB benefits are good through 2000

- After this point, PEBB maintains that it will withdraw non-HMO
plans and opt-out cash back. Perceived problems with this
proposal include insurance cover during sabbaticals (HMO plans
cover 90 days only) and the loss of opt-out cash, which comprise,
in many faculty lives, appreciated and/or substantial salary.

- OUS must make its intentions to withdraw from PEBB by 1/1/00;
OSU and U of O Faculty Senates have put forth resolutions to do
so (Joel has distributed these via email previously).

- A statement to withdraw could result in a few potential scenarios:
(a) PEBB may withdraw its plans and willingly create a faculty-
specific program; (b) PEBB may not agree and OUS may seek
new coverage. PEBB decisions/contracts will be made at the end
of March, 2000.

- It is unclear how the Governor/Chancellor's Office will respond to
this problem given other PEBB issues in the state; concerns
about "political vengeance" given higher education budgets have
been raised. However, Marion reported that the Governor's office
listened carefully to the OUS issues during a recent presentation, a
potential good sign.

- The previously presented notion (1997 data) that faculty are a
"healthy" group of individuals who cost less to maintain (in terms of
insurance, that is) was not born out in the 1999 data. Reasons for
this, such as aging faculty and stress, were discussed.

- Given this discussion, we read the resolution draft. It was
suggested and approved that one item be changed (the statement
"Faculty ...represent a relatively low-cost pool..." was changed to
"Faculty... historically represent..."

- We approved the resolution. Joel will send the resolution to OUS
and the Governor. 


The meeting was adjourned.


Minutes 23 November 1999

| No Comments
Faculty Senate Meeting
3:30 Tuesday, November 23, 1999
Columbia Room, Werner University Center

1.0  Call to Order

2.0  Call of the Roll:  Stephanie Tunison, Linda Keller, Meredith
Brodsky, Leo Rasca-Hidalgo, Martin Rodriquez-Perez, Tina Fuchs,
and Obie Garza were absent.  Substitution:  Susan Daniel
substituted for Carol Harding.  A large contingent of guests were
present, including faculty, administrators, and a student reporter.

3.0  Corrections to minutes from the previous senate meeting:
Janeanne Rockwell-Kincanon put forth the correction/addition of her
election to the Honor Code Committee at the last meeting.  With
this correction, the previous minutes were approved.

Joel put forth that Item 8.1-8.3 (New Business:  Budget
Presentations and Question/Answer Discussion) be moved to the
first order of business.  This motion was approved.

(Sarah's Insert:  I have summarized and condensed 8.1-3 as much
as possible, owing to the fact that this portion of the meeting lasted
about two hours.  Substantial reports/paperwork was distributed;
please review and consult this information as I will not go into
specific details in the minutes.  Only a partial tape recording,
through the ninety-minute point is available, covering nearly all of
this section).

8.1:  Budget Presentation - Provost Minahan, with Sherry Perry
Provost Minahan stressed that he believes a budget presentation
must become a quarterly component of Senate Meetings given the
now tuition-driven funding model.  He defined that our budget
consists of two funding sources (1)  Fees/tuition, now kept 100%
on campus and (2) State-appropriated additions that are program-
specific in amount.  He next went on to acknowledge that faculty
are severely underpaid, summarizing findings by the AAUP
regarding comparison institute salaries.  He noted that Western's
excellent fringe benefits should be considered alongside salaries.

He then reported that, in contrast with many perceptions, there
was not adequate budget to fulfill salary increases beyond the
Chancellor Office-defined adjustments (4% overall, with yearly
increments until 2001).  He explained, using distributed budget
tables, that, while freshman enrollment exceeded expectations,
upper division and masters level enrollment failed to meet
expectations.  He did stress that retention was up significantly
between the freshman and sophomore level, however.  The net
effect was that the university would have to return 1.5 million (of
an approximately 30 million pre-allocation by the state) by the end
of the year based on estimates.  He emphasized that raising
salaries is of utmost importance and, to best deal with faculty
expectations/bargaining, that a search/hiring freeze for new faculty
hires will take effect to free up monies for this process.  Only direct
replacement of retirees or special hires will occur.  He also
emphasized that classified salaries were now decoupled from
faculty salaries and that this recent separation should
assist with faculty negotiations.

Sherry Perry went through distributed budget reports carefully,
corroborating specific points made by the Provost.

8.2:  Budget Presentation -  Ed Dover

Ed Dover described the basic tuition/state model as the visible
budget (i.e. the 30 million outlined in the Provost's presentation)
and then suggested that we also consider revenue that was not
included in this budget, including distance education, unrestricted
gifts, service funds, auxiliary enterprise, and miscellaneous
gifts/grants/contracts.  Revenue and budget combined, he stated,
should total over 67 million dollars - adequate for salary increases
beyond the Chancellor's Office-approved increase.  A summary of
this budget/revenue was distributed.  He suggested that monies for
salary be re-appropriated from funds within this revenue as many
were defined in terms of faculty development and advancement.

He went on to directly compare several named faculty and
administrators in terms of salary.  Finally, he distributed a
comparison of different potential faculty salaries over the next two
years based on either (a)  the WOU Management Plan/Offer;  or (b)
 basic Social Security/cost of living adjustments, pointing out that
they are essentially equal.

8.3  Budget Presentation Question/Answer Discussion

Some highlights of the major issues:

(1)  Much discussion throughout this section went into the Higher
Education Board's nearly three-year-old stated commitment to
raising Oregon faculty salaries above the 50th percentile
(nationwide).  Dr. Youngblood said that she has repeatedly raised
this issue with the Board with no movement/answers.  In response
to follow-up questions about how other campuses are dealing with
salaries, she said that other campuses had or were in the process
of negotiating only (approximately) 2-5% budget increases.

(2)  Related to point (1), significant questions were raised regarding
the legislature-approved additional 100 million dollars for higher
education (namely:  why was only 11 million of this amount
allocated for salaries given the Board's apparent commitment to
this issue and where is the rest of the money going?).  Reasons for
the 11 million allotment were not clear and questions about the
latter point yielded limited hard information;  Provost Minahan said
at least 15 million was reserved to covering tuition freeze
expenses.  Sherry Perry also pointed out where our allotment of
this sum is on the provided budget sheets.

(3)  Significant discussion also went into the question of who
"defines" (or approves) salaries.  While it was stated that the
Chancellor's Office must approve salaries, it was suggested that,
legally, Western could, in fact, argue for autonomy (and, thus,
substantial salary increases).

(4)  The question of whether an actual budget expenditure report
was available for review was raised.  Sherry Perry said that all
previous years' reports were available in the library.  The current
report has been made available to union leaders/bargaining team
members.

(5)  It was also stressed that some of the "revenue" sources noted
by Ed Dover were inaccessible to appropriation for salaries.  The
Auxiliary monies, for example, are student activity fee generated,
to be used only for student activity-associated activities.  Gray
areas, however, include what constitutes "faculty development" and
"administrative" salaries that pertain to faculty with partial
administrative duties.

(6)  The question of why we were seemingly not "seeing" that
anticipated extra revenue (i.e. the money that used to get sent
back to the legislature to assist other campuses) was raised.
Simply, it's too early to see that progress after only eight weeks of
the new model.

(7)  The issue of comparing a twelve-month salary (i.e. generally
administrative) to a nine-month salary (i.e.generally faculty) was
also raised because it appeared as though faculty salaries, when
"expanded" to twelve months, were often similar to a twelve month
salaries.  Several faculty felt that professors are expected to be
productive and are evaluated on the basis of development that
occurs twelve months of the year and that any such comparisons
were inappropriate.

During the above discussion, there were two motions to extend the
meeting.  Both were approved.  Finally, it was moved and approved
that we move on to old business, extending this final segment of
the meeting another twenty minutes.

4.0  Reports of the Presidents
4.1 Senate President

Joel summarized events at the recent Executive Committee
Meeting, including the approval of 4.11 (PE 461).  He reminded
senators that the next official meeting was January 11, although an
emergency meeting could be called by a minimum of 16 senators.
He previewed a key issue at the next meeting regarding PEBB
options as outlined in a recent OSU Faculty Senate letter.  He will
be distributing copies of this letter to senators shortly.

4.2  President of Western Oregon University

Dr. Youngblood reported the passing of the new Anthropology
Degree;  it will now move in the mandatory 45-day wait period for
review/comment by private institutes.

4.3  Student Body President:  Obie Garza was absent

5.0-6.7  There were no reports by IFS or any Faculty Senate Sub-
Committees.

7.0  Consideration of Old Business

7.1  IFS Senator Election

Nominees Bob Turner and Dovie Trevino were put forth for
consideration of a four-year term, replacing Marion Schrock during
his final year and continuing for the duration of the regularly three-
year term. Bob Turner was elected.

7.2  Final Honor Code Committee Members

Humanities still needs to provide a member.  Despite this, it was
requested that the committee meet, elect a chair, and begin
discussions.

7.3  Enrollment Committee

Education will provide a member shortly.  Joel will be verifying that
Mark Henkels intends to represent Liberal Arts and Sciences.

7.4  Faculty Senate Diversity Statement

Two issues were discussed:  First, questions about the
statement's assertion that public documentation of
crimes/violations must be encouraged on campus was brought up
as a potential violation of the constitutional rights/civil privacy rights
of violators.  It was suggested that the policy should be applied
only as a general anonymous report in the newspaper (for
example).  Second, questions about the publication format of the
faculty statement were entertained.  It was decided to place
the statement in the WOU newspaper as a full page.  The
statement was approved.

The meeting was adjourned (at nearly 6 p.m., I will add).
 
 

Minutes 9 November 1999

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Faculty Senate Meeting 

November 9, 1999 

Columbia Roomer, Werner University Center 

1.0 Call to Order 


2.0 Call of the Roll: 

Meredith Brodsky, Jim Chadney, Ming-Chi Own,
Andrey Clarke, Tina Fuchs, Leo Rasca-Hidalgo, Darryl Thomas, Linda
Stonecipher, Stephanie Tunison, and Marion Schrock were absent

3.0 Corrections to and approval of the minutes from the previous
senate meeting; Agenda adjustments. Minutes approved. No
adjustments. 


4.0 Reports of the Presidents 


4.1 Senate President: 

Joel said there had not been an Executive
Meeting on Monday and thus there were no decisions about
Curriculum Proposals yet. 


4.2 President of Western Oregon University. 

President Youngblood
invited questions. Provost Minahan answered questions about the
state of several newly proposed degrees. He emphasized that there is a
mandatory wait period of 45 days during which time private
universities may consider/respond to new offerings at other
universities. The MS has been approved in Social Policy. The
Anthropology degree awaits approval. The Forensic Chemistry
program has been approved but awaits an appropriate new hire. 


4.3 Student Body President. 

Obie Garza discussed the recent passage
of Resolution 99101, which regards diversity and tolerance on campus.
He described recent meetings with Governor Kitzhaber, which
regarded tuition freezes and childcare assistance for students. He
mentioned working with Provost Minahan on a proposed Chicana
minor for Western. Finally, he discussed his recent experiences at the
conference for the American Council of Education. 


5.0 Reports of Interinstitutional Faculty Senators: 

none. 


6.0 Reports of Faculty Senate Sub-Committees: 

Only Brian Caster
(Curriculum Committee) spoke, reminding faculty that the last meeting
of the term would be next Tuesday (11/16). 


7.0 Consideration of Old Business: 


7.1 WOU and Diversity: 

Members from most divisions shared input
derived from faculty at recent division meetings. These included
issuing several public statements: the placement of advertisements in
the university newspaper and the holding of public rallies, both aimed
at supporting diversity, tolerance, and respect on campus. These also
included recommendations about specific campus policy that should be
considered: (1) that a diversity/respect statement be included in any
potential Honor Code being drawn up; and (2) that a special
category of misconduct (and penalty) be defined for "hate crimes" in
the campus conduct code. Obie Garza emphasized the faculty could do
many things simply in the classroom. 


7.2 IFS Member election: 

None - See Joel's recent email about
specifics for this position. 


7.3 Honor Code Committee Member election: 

Karen Haberman
(Natural Sciences/Math), Bob Aldridge (Creative Arts/Music), Kim
Jensen (Social Sciences), Linda Keller (Special Education), Laura
Riolli-Saltzman (Business and Economics) were elected.
Health/Physical Education, Humanities, and Computer Science still
need to elect members to this Sub-Committee. 


7.4 Enrollment Committee Member election: 

None. Please gather
nominees for this sub-committee. 


7.5 Faculty Senate Webpage: 

Chehalis Strapp and Sarah Boomer
volunteered to work with Joel on this site (as described at the last
meeting). It was also recommended that an ordered discussion group
function be available on this site so that issues may be further debated
by senators on-line. Sarah Johnson (Instructional
Designer/Educational Media Center) will be consulted. 


8.0 Consideration of New Business 


8.1 Evaluation of the Writing Intensive Class Designation: 

A lengthy
discussion of this topic ensued following Carol Harding's introduction
and overview of writing intensive coursework and the approval
process. Some major points:

- Joel recommended that the Academic Requirements Committee
perform a re-evaluation of the writing intensive requirements. This
motion was approved by the Senate.

- It is unclear whether there are enough designated writing intensive
classes in each major to allow students to complete writing
requirements; faculty are strongly encouraged to develop new
curriculum or seek approval for potential writing intensive coursework
they currently teach.

- A previously published handbook on writing intensive classes will be
re-published by the registrar and made available through the writing
center.

- Comments about the lengthiness of the paperwork/process were made
by a faculty member who had recently submitted materials for approval.

- There was moderate discussion about the appropriateness of some
writing intensive requirements for certain disciplines (e.g. science and
math).

- Requests were made to better list "writing intensive" courses in the
schedule and the catalog; one problem noted was that some general
courses had been approved writing intensive as taught by one faculty
but not by others (and this complicated records).

- The questions of student feedback, faculty evaluation/perceptions of
student writing in upper division courses, and post-graduate
evaluation of Western's program was undertaken, albeit with little
resolution. Relative to other Oregon Universities, it was noted, Western
requires the minimum number of freshman writing courses (because we
require upper division writing). Thus, the efficacy of supplementary
writing intensive-desginated upper division coursework must be
strongly considered. 


The meeting was adjourned.


Minutes 12 October 1999

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Faculty Senate Meeting 

Tuesday, October 12, 

3:30 p.m.
North Pacific Room 

I. Call to Order 


II. Call of the Roll: 

Merideth Brodsky, Marion Schrock, Michael
Cihak, Tina Fuchs, Leo Rasca-Hidalgo, and Martin Rodriguez
Perez were absent. I explained the nametag process that I would
be using to take roll. Joel introduced new individuals: Senators
Andrey Clarke (Social Sciences) and Donna Perry (Social
Sciences), and the new ASWOU President (Obie Garza). 


III. Corrections to and approval of the minutes from the previous
senate meeting/Agenda Adjustments. Minutes approved. 


IV. Reports of the Presidents 

A. Senate President
Joel welcomed everyone and provided a general introduction to the
meeting. 

B. President of Western Oregon University
Dr. Youngblood spoke on the following issues:
- The library is on schedule with complete funding.
- The Werner Center is scheduled for completion in March, 2000.
- Freshmen enrollment is up 14%; overall is up 3% (approximately).
- A draft of the new Preamble and revised Mission Statement was
issued for consideration. The Preamble is a new requirement from
the State Board; it is meant to address the unique role of Western
in the State System and will be submitted shortly to the
Chancellor's Office. Input is requested. Dr. Youngblood
suggested, too, that it should reflect the aspirations of the
university. This prompted questions about program changes and
development. The specific mention of Fire Administration was also
discussed; Dr. Youngblood emphasized that Western is unique in
providing this training. Revisions in the Mission statement include
a point that addresses diversity and another point that emphasizes
Division II athletics. Input should be directed to either Joel or Dr.
Youngblood. 


C. Student Body President
Obie Garza introduced himelf and his freshman assistant and then
addressed the following points:
- A new computer lab was established in the Werner Center using
incidental fees (it should be operating in Winter).
- On-line Registration for 3rd and 4th year students should be
available in winter.
- Students are working to extend computer center hours and
improve the fitness center.
- Jim Hoag was commended for assistance with many of the
computer-related issues described.
- Obi also commended the new mission statement and added that
he will be involved with diversity and recruitment services and
programs heavily.
- Student elections will be held shortly to fill remaining positions,
including those that serve university subcommittees.
- Final comments were made about homecoming, the new mascot
uniform, and the upcoming ASWOU retreat. 


V. Reports of the Interinstitutional Faculty Senators
Marion provided Joel with a summary of the recent meeting and
Joel distributed this hand-out and highlighted the following: 

- The new budget model was the major focus of the meeting.
- The issue of faculty salary and perks was discussed further: In
particular, it was noted that some other institutes were strongly
advocating free tuition be given to faculty members' families
(although the legality of this may be in question). Dr. Youngblood
noted that this may be a topic at an upcoming Board Meeting in
terms of our university; Dr. Minahan pointed out that increasing
salaries should be carefully weighed against increasing perks.
- It was also noted that Western should avoid "regional"
classification.

STRONG note: Marion's term will end this November and his
position needs to be filled (elected in the Faculty Senate) prior to
the week one December IFS meeting. General requirements:
nontenured faculty will attend weekend meetings at institutes
around the state (expenses paid) approximately five times a year.
The IFS senator plays a KEY role in speaking on behalf of the
University to the leglislature. Please announce this at Division
Meetings to solicit nominees in four weeks. 


VI. Reports of Faculty Senate Subcommittees
Brian reviewed a comprehensive list of all faculty subcommittees
and their members (this list was provided to each senator). Please
note vacancies and solicit faculty nominees via Division Meetings.
Some other key comments:
- A new committee (Jensen Lecture Committee) was formed and is
headed by Dale Canon. It was requested that a Library Faculty
position be added to this committee. This was tabled for
discussion until the next meeting.
- The Honors Committee has an approved additional site for a
Liberal Arts Faculty Member.
- Brian reported that the Curriculum Committee will hold their first
meeting next Tuesday and again on Nov. 16. Please note that if
you are considering proposal submission.
- While there was no Graduate report, it was noted by Dr. Minahan
that a new Director of Graduate Studies should be hired by July,
2000; the advertisement for the position has just been placed.
It was also emphasized that graduate student attendance in this
committee must improve.
- Darryl reported on behalf of the Academic Information Committee:
on-line registration, grade submission, and web-based rosters were
all mentioned as new services for faculty and students at Western.
The the library seeks to update and utilize more electronic sources
for books or journals.
- There was no report from the Honors or International Committee. 


VII. Old Business 

A. Honor Code:
Joel discussed an email sent by Mike Walsh (Judicial Affairs)
regarding his interest in working with faculty to establish an Honor
Code at Western (noting that we lack a true code and, at present,
work under a "Code of Responsibilities" in the Student Handbook).

There was some discussion about Honor Codes at other institutes:
- Please survey the semi-comprehensive site provided by Joel and
Chehalis (see the recent email from Joel).
- Chehalis noted her findings that other Oregon institutes have no
coherent code that operates for the entire university.
- I noted that the Rice University Honor Code homepage (linked
within the aforementioned site) was extremely useful.
- Joel requested that faculty further examine these sources to
resume discussion next time.

Other generally related comments were made:
- Student involvement must be considered in this issue.
- Ultimately, a subcommittee should be formed.
- There remained some question about how carefully the Student
Handbook was discussed during Orientation week.
- Library representatives offered to examine what steps they could
take to alert students about intellectual ownership in terms of
plagiarism given that they provide students with resources.
- General reminders: leaving exams and assignments outside
offices should be avoided (there may be students who do randomly
take these items for distribution/sale?)
- Questions were raised about who was to document cases, given
the time-consuming nature of this task. 

B. Vice President Election
Laura Riolla-Saltzmann was nominated and approved. 

C. Special Message Regarding Expansion
A message from Social Science, via Roshani Shay, was conveyed
by Joel regarding their interest in carefully examining enrollment
and class size as the University seeks expansion. Dr. Youngblood
mentioned that Michael Cihak is heading an Enrollment
Management Advisory Council and thus it may be wise to integrate
both interested groups. It was decided that that would be a topic
for the Executive Committee Meeting. 


The meeting was adjourned.


Minutes 13 July 1999

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Faculty Senate Meeting 

Tuesday, July 13, 1999; 

2:00 p.m.
Columbia Room 


(1) Call to Order 



(2) Call of the Roll: 

Present: Joel Alexander, Chehalis Strepp, Carl Stevenson, Linda
Stonecipher, Laura Riolli-Saltzman, Judy Bullington, Carol Harding,
Janeanne Rockwell-Kincanon, Sarah Boomer, Mike Ward, Irja Galvan,
Rebecca March-McCannell, Linda Keller, and John Minahan 


(3) Corrections/Approval of previous minutes, Agenda Adjustments: 

Susan Woods' previous minutes have not been located; notes or tape
recording will be searched for. 


(4) Reports of the Presidents: 

Senate President: Introduction

President of Western Oregon University:
John Minahan addressed the following -

(a) Working under existing budget until legislature convenes 

(b) Summarized courses approved by curriculum committee 

(c) North Coast Expansion:
- Newport/Tilamook/Astoria programs will emphasize 300 level
curriculum, most a duplicate of existing courses
- Assessment of potential students shows that criminal justice,
computer science, business strong components; art in question
- Estimated 6-7 adjunct faculty coast residents targeted for
hire 

(d) new one-year catalog out in August; next year's should be
a four-year catalog 

(e) summer enrollment steady; several questions about summer
program management and future course offerings addressed

Student Body President: absent 


(5) Reports of the Interinstitutional Faculty Senators: 

Irja Galvan
- no report 


(6) Reports of the Faculty Senate Sub-Committees: 

no report

- Committee on Committees: Carl Stevenson and Rebecca
Marsh-McCannell volunteered for two new positions 


(7) Consideration of old business: 

- new Secretary: Sarah Boomer
- new Vice President: subject for first fall meeting; contact Joel
if interested in nomination (should have one year minimum senate
experience). Job duties: holding elections, filling in for Senate
President, and attending executive committee meetings 


(8) Plans for Upcoming Year: ("Homework" for Senators)

Honor Code: 

- address need for code vs. improved syllabi
- collect codes from other schools; review current handbook
- address avenues for solving cases (in-house vs. judicial affairs) -
address mentoring junior faculty
- suggestion: include discussions with Student Senate

Writing Intensive Courses:
- Review approval process
- Review requirements
- Review Teaching
- Review follow-up process

Add New Issues: gather from Division/Department


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