Ponce de Leon

Unit Overview

Intro Lesson Plans

Vikings

Marco Polo

B. Dias

V. da Gama

Columbus

A. Vespucci

Balboa

Magellan

Northwest Passage

Ponce de Leon

Cortes

Pizarro

Jeopardy Review

Resources

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Lesson Plan 18

Benchmark:
       Fifth Grade/Writing
Unit Goal:
       Students will use a variety of strategies such as brainstorming and making lists to present important ideas using an organizational structure.
Objective 2.5: 
After reading to the students, pages 77-81 in Around the World in a Hundred Years by Jean Fritz, the students will create a brochure enticing sailors from the year 1513 to join Ponce de Leon on his voyage to search for The Fountain of Youth. 
Materials:


         ~Around the World in a Hundred Years by Jean Fritz
         ~Ponce de Leon Wants You worksheet

Procedure:
A. Anticipatory set
          Ask the students if they have ever heard of The Fountain of Youth.  Let some of them share their ideas as to what it is.  Tell them the explorer they are going to learn about today was the man who went in search of such a thing.
B. Teaching
Read to the students pages 77-81 in Around the World in a Hundred Years by Jean Fritz.  This book will give you details of Ponce de Leon and his journeys that lead him to discover and name Florida, as well as go in search of The Fountain of Youth.        
C. Independent Application
         Pass out the Ponce de Leon Wants You worksheet to each student.  The main idea of the activity is to turn it into a brochure that would entice sailors to join Ponce de Leon’s crew.  Have the students work on the writing portion first.  They need to fill in the brochure as if they were back in 1513, trying to get men to read their brochure.
         Once the writing is complete, the students need to then draw two pictures in the boxes provided.  One should depict what they think Florida would have looked like in 1513, and the other is for them to draw what they think The Fountain of Youth would look like.  To finish the activity, they need to cut out the brochure, fold it in half, and draw a front cover on it.  The cover should have a title that would get someone’s attention.
D. Closure
         The students need to glue this brochure into their Explorer Books onto page 11, with the cover of the brochure showing.
Meeting Varying Needs:
         Some students may need help dictating for them, and others may need help coming up with some ideas.  The good thing about this lesson is that if a student gets done with the writing portion early, there is plenty of drawing and coloring that needs to be done.  If a student is struggling with completing the whole activity, it would not be difficult to finish the coloring at home.
Assessment:
         As long as the students have completed all of the steps required from this activity, assessment will be easy.  They will need to use complete sentences of course when they are writing.

What Will You Need?
Lesson Plan 19

Benchmark:
       Fifth Grade/Writing
Unit Goal:
       Students will use a variety of strategies such as brainstorming and making lists to present important ideas using an organizational structure.
Objective 2.6: 
After using the students to physically represent the size of a ship, the students will write in complete sentences to the store clerk asking for food, weapons, tools, and trade for their sea voyage they are going to take. 
Materials:


       ~A measurement tool to measure out the size of a ship (86ft long, 25ft wide)
         ~What Will You Need? worksheet

Procedure:
A. Anticipatory set
         Add Ponce de Leon to the Wall Map and their timelines.  Recap on his accomplishments as you do this.  Talk about if the students really were back in 1513 and they had to get a ship ready for an expedition.  Ask them if they would know what to pack, and how much to pack.
B. Teaching/Group Application
         A ship used for exploring back in those days were roughly 86 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 18 feet deep.  With your measuring tool, take the students outside into a wide-open area, and have the students line up in a line. 
Have one student stand on the starting point, and then take your measuring tool and measure out to 43 feet.  Place one student at that point, and then measure another 43 feet and have another student stand at the ending point.  You have just created a straight line measuring 86 feet.  Back at the middle student, measure out 12.5 feet to the right (have a student stand there) and 12.5 feet to the left (have a student mark that place).  You should have a crossed formed with 5 students.  With your remaining students, have them fill in the spaces between your starting students.  (Remember, a boat is wider in the middle than it is at the front or the back.)
 

C. Independent Application
         Once the students can see the relative size of the ship, take them back into the classroom and pass out What Will You Need? worksheet to each student.  This worksheet is set as if the student was the captain of his or her own ship and they had to pack it for a 3-month expedition.  The students have to write a letter to the store clerk asking for the items they will need. 
         The directions state that the writing has to be done in complete sentences asking for food for a crew of 25, tools, weapons, and parts for repairing the ship. 
D. Closure
         Once the students have completed this writing, ask for some volunteers to read their letter to the class.  It would be fun to pretend to be the clerk and “jot” down what they are asking for.  If you come across a student who has left out the quantity of each item, point that out after they have finished reading their letter.  Encourage students to go back and make sure they have done this correctly.
Meeting Varying Needs:
         Every student will be able to participate in the size of the ship activity.  The class can help you count out the feet, but you will be doing the measuring.  You will go around and help dictate, or offer ideas to students who need some extra assistance.
Assessment:
         Check to see if each student letter is written in complete sentences, has covered food, tools, weapons, and repair, and has a quantity of some kind for each item.