Third Round

This last weekend was so much fun. I got invited by the childcare educator who I have been job shadowing and working with to see a different side of Buenos Aires. She took me to the bosques de Palermo, which is a large portion of the city filled with beautiful parks where people love to meet up to listen to music, exercise, take pictures, have picnics, and so much more. She took me for a walk to see Palermo in the daytime, where all the bars during the day become a shopping fair for jewelry, leather, clothes, shoes, and other items. It is amazing how Buenos Aires transitions from day to nighttime, laid back to full of life. She also had me try the typical and traditional carne asada (BBQ) and milanesa (crispy chicken) of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Additionally, I got to try the famous classical Havanna alfajores (pastries) and café (coffee) from this country. Must admit the food here is mouth watering.

This is a picture of the common graffiti found in the streets of Buenos Aires.

This is a picture of the common graffiti found in the streets of Buenos Aires.

This is a picture of a theater performance my co-worker and I saw as we walked along the bosques de Palermo.

This is a picture of a theater performance my co-worker and I saw as we walked along the bosques de Palermo.

This is a picture of the carne asada (BBQ) and milanesa (crispy chicken) that I had for lunch with my co-worker.

This is a picture of the carne asada (BBQ) and milanesa (crispy chicken) that I had for lunch with my co-worker.

This is a picture of me and my co-worker in los bosques de Palermo.

This is a picture  my co-worker  and I in the bosques de Palermo.

This is a picture I took during a musical performance done along the shopping fairs in Palermo, Buenos Aires.

This is a picture I took during a musical performance done along the shopping fairs in Palermo, Buenos Aires.

This is a picture of one of Palermo's plazas that I took while I walked around with my co-worker.

This is a picture of one of Palermo’s plazas that I took while I walked around with my co-worker.

The streets of Buenos Aires, Argentina.

The streets of Buenos Aires, Argentina.

This is a picture of some of the best coffee I have ever had along with some alfajores (pastries).

This is a picture of some of the best coffee I have ever had along with some alfajores (pastries).

Now, during this week I continued to work and job shadow the childcare educator, but a different one to observe the different approaches that are being taught. I have also been able to learn the difference between the healthcare systems here and the United States’, as well as how the private and public healthcare services work here. I have been very interested in everything that I have been learning here about the overall healthcare here in Argentina.

I never thought that being in Argentina would allow me to get a grasp of other cultures, but it has. I have been able to be surrounded by other cultures where I have been able to learn about new foods and customs.

Some authentic Brazilian food I got to try.

Some authentic Brazilian food I got to try.

Some authentic Colombian coffee that my new Colombian friends made me as we exchanged a cultural conversation. Not only that, but a great Colombian meal with my roommate from Colombia.

Some authentic Colombian coffee that my new Colombian friends made me as we exchanged a cultural conversation. Not only that, but a great Colombian meal with my roommate from Colombia.

It’s Just the Beginning

This week I have started getting the hang of it, like using the colectivo, knowing some of the streets, and really feeling comfortable in my work environment. Throughout my experience I have been meeting some lovely people here in the city of Buenos Aires most of whom I have had the pleasure to interact with at work. I must say the people here are amazing and beautiful.

This past weekend I got to see what the famous night-life is all about by walking around Palermo Hollywood and going to my first boliche (night club). I got to admit it is busy; it is true what they say, at night it all springs to life. It was a nice experience to get to see Argentina’s nightlife.

This week I was able to put some of my interpreting skills by helping my site coordinator interpret some papers from last week’s meeting about the OMGPIVC Worldwide Prevalence Study. Additionally, I was able to work and job shadow the primary prevention program and occupation here in the Sanatorio that focuses on childcare. I was really surprised on the emphasis of the childcare education in the Sanatorio Mater Dei. I was able to see the interaction with the childcare educator and her patients and hear her presentations and talks with the parents, but most importantly the mothers. One of the days will be a day I will never forget, because of the way she had helped a young mother with her first child. Witnessing what I did reassured me to continue to pursue my goal as a community health educator and nurse. I have learned so much from her this week, even though it was a short week due to the Paro (a strike) of all the closed access to the different systems of transportation in the city, such as buses, subways, taxis, and more this Thursday. The strike was to get the attention of the government, because of all the insecurity and the economy of inflation that has occurred in the last two months. This is why I am excited and looking forward to continue to learn and work with her again next week.

Even though the country has had some trouble it does not fail to impress me with its culture and people. One of the things I ran into is this week was a performance on the streets of the lovely Argentine Tango and for the first time I got to ride an underground subway. I have tried to see as much as I possibly could this week by walking around the city. I got to say there is so much to see, after all it is a city of about 2.9 million people.

 

I took this as I waited for the underground subway to take me around the city.

I took this as I waited for the underground subway to take me around the city.

The tango performance I ran into as I walked around the streets of Florida in Buenos Aires.

The tango performance I ran into as I walked around the streets of Florida in Buenos Aires.

Feeling Homesick

I know it has only been two weeks now, but I cannot help feeling homesick. Being in a different country with new people, new job, new home, new everything its very over whelming. This being my first time far away from home, I guess the feeling should have been expected. I am just thankful I have many people back home that have and continue to be there to support me. Like one important person said to me, “It is the first few weeks that are the hardest after that you might not even want to come back” and that is what I am waiting for.

A little advice I would give to others that are feeling the same way, would be: To take advantage of the opportunity, because it is a short period of time, and it is a once in a life time opportunity that does not come along very often, to take the experience as a growing opportunity, to see, do, and learn new things because new and change is good, to take everything in because when you do go home you will be taking so much with you. I do not mean just the souvenirs, and to know that you have everything and everyone waiting for you when you go home.

Now, even though I have been feeling homesick I have been surprising myself with how I have been adjusting to the culture, the city, the language, which my Latin background from Mexico has given me an advantage, my new home, and my internship. I still have so much to learn, but I am taking it all one-step at a time.

Many Firsts

This week was great I feel like I have so much to say. It was full of many new experiences.

Monday, I was able to start my very first internship at the Sanatorio Mater Dei in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Since it was my first day I did not do allot. I was introduced to some of the employees, I received my uniform and locker, and I was shown a small glimpse of the history of the Sanatorio. Additionally, I was able to join my site coordinator from the Sanatorio to a meeting about the One Million Global Catheters PIVC Worldwide Prevalence Study (OMGPIVC). The PIVC stands for peripheral intravenous catheter that is used to medically provide intravenous fluids and medications directly to the vein, which has risks such as inflammation and infections. Due to the risks many institutions around the globe including the United States are participating to promote awareness and care. This study is known to be the largest international prevalence investigation. I was really fascinated and impressed to hear the process of this study and how about 50 countries are participating. I cannot wait to hear the results. After my internship I joined my new friend from Brazil from BAC to walk around to see the beautiful Congress to end my day.

This is my first day on my internship of the Sanatorio Mater Dei, a prestigious private hospital.

This is my first day on my internship of the Sanatorio Mater Dei, a prestigious private hospital.

During the OMG PIVC meeting with my site coordinator of the Sanatorio.

During the OMG PIVC meeting with my site coordinator of the Sanatorio.

Took this picture o the Congresso during my walk with my Brazilian friend.

Took this picture of the Congresso during my walk with my Brazilian friend.

Tuesday was scary. I was able to take the colectivo (bus) by myself to work and back which by the way I was successful at. In my internship I took a safety course that taught me all the regulations and procedures done when there is an emergency. Then I had the opportunity to meet some of the nurses in the neurotologist for babies and nursery section of the hospital where I was given a tour and had the opportunity to shadow them. After, I was able to take a course that is provided by the Sanatorio to teach mothers about the benefits of lactation. After my internship I arrived home with surprising news of my new roommate from Columbia, who by the way is so genuine. Not only that but I was able to join my BAC coordinator with my previous roommate for some helados (ice cream). What a great way to end my day.

A picture of the helado I had with my BAC coordinator and my previous roommate. It included banana split, chocolate mouse, and a mystery flavor. It is something to try here in Argentina.

A picture of the helado I had with my BAC coordinator and my previous roommate. It included banana split, chocolate mouse, and a mystery flavor. It is something I recommend trying in Argentina.

Wednesday, I did not go to work. Why?! Well because it was a holiday, which is a day to honor the Veterans from the Faulklands War between Argentina and the UK. Having the day off I was able to take a walk with my roommate from Columbia to Puerto Madero to eat and explore Argentina the rest of the day.

Getting some Mexican food with my new roommate in Puerto Madero.

Getting some delicious food with my new roommate in Puerto Madero.

La Casa Rosada (house of government), which is the executive mansion of the president of Argentina.

La Casa Rosada (house of government), which is the executive mansion of the president of Argentina.

Took this near the famous Casa Rosada (Government House) during my walk with my new roommate.

Took this near the famous Casa Rosada (Government House) during my walk with my new roommate.

This was my first empanada I tried here in Argentina.

This was my first empanada I tried here in Argentina after a long day of exploring the city

Thursday and Friday, were a little busier at the Sanatorio where I got to join the new nurses who were integrating to the hospital. After, work on Friday I had my first experience of getting lost trying to find the famous Obelisco of the city Buenos Aires. Fortunately I was able to find my way back, but wow it was scary. I cannot wait for what is more to come!!

Well till next time.

The Obelisco of the great city of Buenos Aires located at the Plaza de República.

The Obelisco of the great city of Buenos Aires located at the Plaza de República.

Arrival

As I landed in Buenos Aires, Argentina my heart started pounding as different possible situations were occurring in my head. Additionally, I had my parents’ voices and phrases repeating over and over such as,”Stay calm when you arrive, be smart, be careful, pay attention, if you get lost ask people around you to help, call immediately once you arrive, do not forget your luggage and to go through immigration, find who ever is picking you up as fast as you can, trust and do not trust people,….”

As I got off the plane I observed what everyone was doing and followed them which allowed me to go through everything much faster. After the long line of immigration my nerves started to kick once again, but as soon as I got all my paper work checked and got my luggage my mission was to find the individual, who was sent to pick me up from Buenos Aires Cultural (BAC). Once I spotted my name on a poster, like the movies, I walked right to him, who welcomed me with a surprise handshake and a kiss on the cheek. As we walked for a ride to BAC I could not help and notice all the traffic, people, buildings, and everything around me, I was in shock. I was able to calm down as he was able to point out buildings and teach me some common phrases used in Buenos Aires and so much more.

Once I arrived to BAC I knew I was not at home, I was in Buenos Aires an incredible and amazing city. As I walked in I was greeted with more kisses on the cheek, which I continued to be surprised from each time since I am not used to it, I guess you can say I was very welcomed. Then I was given a tour of my new, yet temporary home then my room, which I have enjoyed.

This is a picture of my bedroom.

This is a picture of my bedroom.

This is a picture of the hallway of my apartment, which you can see as you walk inside.
This is a picture of the hallway of my apartment, which you can see as you walk inside.

After I settled down, I was introduced to the rest of the diverse group of residents of BAC, who I joined to drink the traditional drink, mate (hot tea), which I found strange, but so very delicious all at once. Then I was able to have some interesting long conversations the rest of the night as we all enjoyed some delicious carne asada (BBQ), which is famous in Argentina. I could not have asked for a better first day in Buenos Aires.

This is the mate (hot tea), which I tried my first day.

This is the mate (hot tea), which I tried my first day.

The next day, Friday my coordinator from BAC took me for a walk to see a little of what the city has to offer. Then I had the opportunity to go to the cinema with a new friend, another student residing in BAC from Brazil to watch Captain America in Castellano, the native tongue here in Argentina. I had a plethora of fun! Saturday, I was able to join another friend, who I am very lucky to share a room with, to try the coffee of Argentina with some sweet facturas (pastry). Then I joined her again with my lovely coordinator and another friend to the shopping (mall) to watch another movie. Today, Sunday I have been able to relax and prepare for my first day tomorrow in my internship, which I am extremely antsy for.

This was a picture I took when my BAC coordinator took me for a walk in the city. There was a great amount of performances and other great things to see.

This was a picture I took when my BAC coordinator took me for a walk in the city. There was a great amount of performances and other great things to see.

This was another picture I took as I walked around the streets of the shopping (mall) districts with my coordinator.

This was another picture I took as I walked around the streets of the shopping (mall) districts with my coordinator.

This is a picture of the facturas (pastries)  and coffee I had with my roommate.
This is a picture of the facturas (pastries) and coffee I had with my roommate.

I am loving Argentina!

My 72 days of Adventure!

Many of us including myself seem to be waiting for something to come to us, for a change to happen. Well I decided that I was tired of waiting, so I decided to step out of my comfort zone, seek out opportunities, and challenge myself by taking on a new and different adventure.

I decided to make my own path by going out to a place for 72 days where I have never been, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

You might be wondering why Argentina. Well there are many reasons, a few are that it is a Latin country where its citizens are proud of their nation, how it is a family oriented country full of celebrations, a country influenced by music and other arts, and because of its healthcare system. Now, from all the places in Argentina I selected Buenos Aires not only because it is the capital, but because it is one of the largest cities in the world where I will be exposed to many new things.

I can assure you that when I decided to take on this amazing opportunity, which I have been blessed with, I was very nervous. I was nervous for the flight, because I have never been on a plane, let alone by myself. Not only that, but I was very scared and anxious to live in a huge city, because I have never lived in one, so I was afraid to get lost. I was excited to see a new culture and country where I would be part of the culture, get the chance to work in it, and meet new people. I felt sad knowing that I would be far away from my family for the first time. Now, even with all my research I felt uncertain, because even knowing what I might expect was not enough, because it is something new which can go in any direction, but with the support I had I was able to push forward.

Prior to my departure, I was full of mixed emotions. After my family said goodbye I was alone and all I could do was maintain myself. As I was trying to find my way to my first flight I was slightly confused, but I was very fortunate to have met friendly people along the way willing to help. I will especially be thankful to an angel of a woman, who sat by me from Portland to Houston, she was such a confidence booster. I can honestly say that for being my first flight, alone, I felt like I did pretty ‘good’ even though I was shaky every time the plane would take off and land. This was definitely a memorable and amazing learning experience.

I took both of these pictures, one before my departure and the other one as I was in the air heading to Houston, Texas from Portland, Oregon.

I took both of these pictures, one before my departure and the other one as I was in the air heading to Houston, Texas from Portland, Oregon.

I took both of these pictures, one before my departure and the other one as I was in the air heading to Houston, Texas from Portland, Oregon.

I took both of these pictures, one before my departure and the other one as I was in the air heading to Houston, Texas from Portland, Oregon.

Week 7 in Argentina. Got to go to an estancia this week.

My seventh week here has been extremely great, and I’m starting to think about how weird it is that I have to go home soon. I’ve been living in a residency with around 35-40 other people who are mostly from Spanish speaking countries. I have three roommates right now, and we all share the same room. I sleep on the top bunk. Needless to say my exposure to Spanish has been pretty intense. I also have been studying the language five hours a day, five days a week. It’s insane how much better my Spanish abilities are since I’ve come here. I wish I could stay here for just a few months more to become more fluent and make fewer errors when I’m trying to speak the language.

 

One aspect about living in Buenos Aires that fascinates me is the variety of reactions I get from strangers that I talk to when they realize that I can’t speak Spanish fluently. Porteños are used to coming into contact with foreigners, but most of the people they meet can already speak Spanish. Some people underestimate how much Spanish I know and they freak out when they think it will be impossible to communicate with me. Some of my friends overestimate how much Spanish I know and they end up talked way to quickly about topics that are way over my head in Spanish. In short, I’ve become really comfortable talking to people in Spanish even though it isn’t perfect and my accent isn’t that great. It’s been fun trying to trick Spanish speakers that I understand what they are saying to me, even though, in reality, I only understood a couple of words that they said.

 

This week was really fun because CIS took us on a trip to an estancia! An estancia is basically an Argentina version of what we in the US call a ranch. I got to ride a horse, eat authentic food while watching people dance the tango and play local music. Overall it was an amazing experience! I also loved that I had my own room with a queen sized bed. There was really good internet there too which is crazy.

The house on the left is giant and very rustic looking on the inside. There was another house on the estancia where people could sleep that was equally nice.

The house on the left is giant and very rustic looking on the inside. There was another house on the estancia where people could sleep that was equally nice.

I got to take part in a giant maté circle at the estancia

I got to take part in a giant maté circle at the estancia

 

This was our entertainment while we enjoyed a six course meal included 4 different types of bbq style meats

This was our entertainment while we enjoyed a six course meal included 4 different types of bbq style meats

 

The horses knew to follow the leader.

The horses knew to follow the leader.

 

There was a show involving this guy demonstrating how they train the horses by dominating them and getting them to be comfortable with human contact.

There was a show involving this guy demonstrating how they train the horses by dominating them and getting them to be comfortable with human contact.

 

Week 6 in Argentina

The last few weeks have been extremely busy, but I have caught my second cold since I have been here so I feel like this is the best time to write about what I have been doing for the past two weeks. Now that I have gotten my second cold here, I have learned why Argentinians (Porteños) always carry around and use hand sanitizer. You are constantly touching germy things like a hand rail on the subway or bus. Plus, most of the foods here are eaten with your hands such as the media luna or empanada.

On Saturday and Sunday during week 6, I got to visit a city called Tigre which is a famous and heavily populated area of Buenos Aires. It takes about two hours to get there from where I live by using public transportation, and the crowds on the bus and on the train are ridiculous on the weekends.

I have never taken the train in Buenos Aires and that in itself was an experience. The train is frustratingly slow and makes several stops on the way to Tigre. Hundreds of people take the train on the weekends and it is nearly impossible to get comfortable and find a good seat. At the beginning, the train drives by the slums of Buenos Aires which look like an area where a severe earthquake hit, only there are actually people living in these destroyed buildings. You know people live there because there are clothes hanging on wires in the abandoned, destroyed housing.

When we finally got to Tigre, we had a tour guide and we got to take a boat around the city. Tigre is the name of a river the flows around the city, and we were able to take a tourist boat that pointed out the attractions of the city. There are a lot of people that do recreational activities like rowing and canoeing on the lake, which is weird because of how cold it is right now in Buenos Aires.

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This is the tour boat we went on

This is the tour boat we went on

A nice view towards Tigre
A nice view towards Tigre

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Tigre is also home to one of the biggest amusement parks in South America (which in reality isn't that big). I don't know if I'd actually ride on any of the rides because I've seen some reports of ride failure, not at this amusement park, but in Rosario, Argentina recently.

Tigre is also home to one of the biggest amusement parks in South America (which in reality isn’t that big). I don’t know if I’d actually ride on any of the rides because I’ve seen some reports of ride failure, not at this amusement park, but in Rosario, Argentina recently.

Tigre is also home to several mercados selling all kinds of random trinkets, clothing, toys and other souvenirs. It is definitely a cool place to go on the weekend because it has water sports, local food, souvenirs and it’s bursting with people. We were also able to attend a maté museum before leaving.

Maté is a huge part of the culture here. You can’t talk about BA without mentioning how obsessive they are with their Maté tradition. I’m pretty sure most people have seen Yerba Maté in stores in the US and I had heard of it before I came here, but they maté here is more fresh and there are various rules and traditions that go along with drinking maté. It’s meant to be shared with a group of people and it’s a very communal activity.

Basically there is a cup or container that they call “maté” and the leaves they put in the cup are called Yerba. The cup is filled with 3/4 maté and the rest is filled with hot water. The resulting yerba/water mix is meant to be drank with a metal straw with little holes on the end to filter the yerba particles.

One person is in charge of filling up the maté cup with hot water, and it generally only takes a minute or so per person to drink the maté. When the person in charge gives you the maté, you have to drink ALL of it. You don’t pass it to the person next to you when you’re done. You give it back to the person with the thermos of hot water in charge of refilling the maté. I like the taste of maté but it has an extremely strong flavor the first time you drink it so it takes awhile to get used to. 1091035_10151558739853091_633053936_o

This is my second try drinking mate. I think I'm addicted!

This is my second try drinking mate. I think I’m addicted!

Arrival Post and First Week in Argentina.

When I landed in Buenos Aires, I was lucky enough to have been able to connect with three other study abroad students who were equally confused as to what to do after we landed. Annoyingly stressful and worrying thoughts kept popping into my head while I was waiting in the extremely long line to get my passport stamped and to get through customs like, “Was I supposed to recheck my luggage when I transferred in Texas? Was I supposed to pick up my luggage before waiting in line to get through customs? What do I do if CIS is not here to pick me up and I have no phone?” Luckily for me, none of these worries ended up being a problem for me and I was able to easily find my luggage and my ride to my residency.

The long long line of people trying to get into Argentina from the United States.

The long long line of people trying to get into Argentina from the United States.

Being driven through the streets of Argentina was surreal, and I was way too tired to be able to process the fact that I was in a strange land far away from home. My mind kept trying to make comparisons to places I have been before in the United States to these new places and images I was observing while being driven through Buenos Aires. The grey skies and cold weather reminded me of Oregon. Being an Oregon native, I am accustomed to seeing stores in all Spanish. This kept me from feeling too odd while observing a city that only speaks and operates in Spanish.

This statue is right next to where I live. I use it as a reference point to know when to get off the bus on my way home from school.

This statue is right next to where I live. I use it as a reference point to know when to get off the bus on my way home from school.

After being being dropped off at my residency and taking a long nap, my CIS advisor took me and another CIS student on a tour around the residence area. One thing I noticed while on my walk is that Buenos Aires does not feel like a extremely foreign country on the outside. The buildings, architecture, clothing, and advertisements are very similar to the western culture that I am used to. It wasn’t until I tried ordering food by myself that I truly felt like an outsider to the culture.

Me and Leah having dinner at a really nice restaurante in BA. This was my first Argentine meal.

Me and Leah having dinner at a really nice restaurante in BA. This was my first Argentine meal.

One thing that really amuses me is how much culture in the United States has become infused with the culture in Buenos Aires, especially in terms of US entertainment. There are many US brands, fast food, TV shows and movies here. I was in a fancy bakery the other day and they we playing the song “Gangsta’s Paradise” by Coolio. I was hanging out at a big billiards/bar here and 90% of the songs that they played were current pop hits and a few 80s and 90s hits as well. One of the bars that we walked by had a cover band that were doing several covers of famous songs from the US. It’s interesting how far away from home US culture has spread.

Another interesting event that happened to me was that I was able to make friends with people from a different study abroad program in the US. My first or second day here, I was able to join along with student from their program for a guided tour of a very nice Catholic church as well as one of the nicest graveyards in the entire world. The graveyard tour was definitely the highlight of my trip so far because I was able to learn about the history of all of the famous Argentine figures that were buried there (such as Evita) and I also got to observe the immaculate sculptures and art that went in to making the mausoleums that these Argentines were buried in.

Glimpse of just of few of the immaculate mausoleums that we got to see.

Glimpse of just of few of the immaculate mausoleums that we got to see.

Picture of the pope inside of a Catholic church

Picture of the pope inside of a Catholic church

This what the exit of the graveyard looked like.

This what the exit of the graveyard looked like.

The only thing that has frightened me about being here so far is that I have been repeatedly told to be careful about valuable electronics such as cameras, phones and computers. This has made me wary to use my phone to take pictures. I also brought a non-digital 35mm camera, but I’m afraid to use this camera too in case someone mistakes it for a nice camera. It also makes me look more like a tourist.

I am looking forward to the coming week and will hopefully have many more stories and pictures to share on next week’s blog!

Less than 24 hours

I currently have a break from a project we have been working on and I decided I’d write my last blog entry. Argentina has open my eyes in varies ways. Whether it was listening to the many conversations that happened within the VOX space, seeing the reality of folks living within Rosario in comparison to the outer cities/towns or towns in the northern part of Argentina, interacting with people from different backgrounds and ideologies, challenging myself to see things from another point of view even though it at times was extremely uncomfortable, working with the resources available, and so much more has definitely made me grow as an individual. All of the relationships I established and folks I came across is probably the biggest thing I am going to miss and take with me. I know that it will not end here; now that I will be flying back to Oregon. My wish and intentions are to continue to keep in touch and collaborating with everyone in one way or another. Furthermore, I am going to miss not being able to participate more within the organization. Now that I am leaving, things have been picking up so much more. NOW for instances. We are working on promoting the group and a bar of Rosario and making videos. I’ll literally be working until a few hours before I leave. On another note, there are projects to go to neighborhoods, HIV survey, or an event for the Stonewall Riots that I have been contributing too that I wont be able to be present at the time of the event. I wish I could stay to see how everything turns out, but I am also aware that this day would come.

Going home is a bitter sweet feeling. I am super excited to see my family and friends (now that I am not as emotional as I was last week and am basically in a “okay, lets go now” mentality). I know as soon as I get to Independence, I am going to go eat some Primos tacos and a torta with lots of hot sauce! I have been applying for jobs and have a few meetings and things I need to do right when I get back so that’ll help me in a sense transition back. I think though after that, it’s going to be a process once again getting use to the whole USA culture and how life is over there. Being in Argentina, I was most of the time surrounded by folks who thought and acted much different than what U.S. citizen think and do. As a social science major, I knew where I stood in terms of my view of the U.S.A and being here reinforced that. Now stepping back in, I hope it doesn’t overwhelm me…I’ll be fine though…

I fly out from Buenos Aires in less than 24 hours and will arrive to Portland around noon on Tuesday. I can’t wait to finally be able to drive my car HAHA. But seriously, if there is something i really can’t wait for, it is the food. I CAN’T WAIT TO EAT SOME DELICIOUS MEXICAN FOOOOOOOD!!!

Argentina has been real and welcoming. I thank you Argentina. But my time has come. Oregon, nos vemos en unas horas!