The Recreation Collection has moved

Recreation Collection new locationLooking for a book to read for fun? Check out the library’s Recreation Collection in its NEW temporary location on the short bookshelves between the computer banks on the 1st floor. The collection will live here during the construction of the new library cafe this winter.

As always, you can browse the Recreation Collection online, too. And if you’re just not sure what you want to read next, let us help! Fill out this short form and your WOU librarians will get back to you with a book or two you might like.

Happy Reading!

Changes coming to the library!

Hamersly LibraryWOU’s Dean of Library Services, Dr. Allen McKiel, emailed out the following announcement to campus on Monday about changes coming to Hamersly Library:

“There are exciting changes afoot at Hamersly Library. I am delighted to announce that over winter break, we will begin physical modifications to enhance the learning commons environment to better meet the needs of a twenty-first century campus. The addition of a first floor café will be the first tangible sign of these changes…” Read the Dean’s full announcement here.

Announcement: Hamersly Library Learning Commons

Hamersly LibraryWOU’s Dean of Library Services, Dr. Allen McKiel, emailed out the following announcement to campus on Monday about changes coming to Hamersly Library:

“There are exciting changes afoot at Hamersly Library. I am delighted to announce that over winter break, we will begin physical modifications to enhance the learning commons environment to better meet the needs of a twenty-first century campus. The addition of a first floor café will be the first tangible sign of these changes.

Among other prominent features of the learning commons will be increased group study spaces, additional computers, space for tutoring, more power outlets, and technology and assistance for video and audio production. A library foundation account with donor funds remaining from the initial building construction are being used to fund the project.

It is important to note that all of these expanded resources and services will be in addition to, and not in replace of, the library collections.

The ongoing design of the Hamersly learning commons thus far has been informed by a wide variety of sources including: library usage data, library literature (most notably an Education Advisory Board learning commons study), a WOU student survey (326 participants), visits to learning commons of other libraries, as well as ongoing discussion and consultation with WOU food services, the physical plant, architectural services, WOU administration, and faculty and staff currently involved with tutoring in the library.

At the time Hamersly Library was designed and built, some of the learning commons trends were already emerging particularly the emphasis on group projects. Hamersly library was built with more group study rooms than libraries built earlier. Nevertheless, there are not enough to accommodate the growing demand. The expanded study spaces of the learning commons will be comprised of a variety of furnishings including living room style, additional traditional study tables of various sizes, and wheeled, modular pieces to facilitate custom groupings.

Along with reconfiguration of study and service areas, another aspect of the project involves finishing unused space on the 3rd floor for archives collections and general storage space.

Please feel free to come see or email me or your librarian with questions or suggestions.”

Tech Tuesday: Microphones

Are you are working on a video or digital project for a class or student organization? Using a microphone for the voice over, instead of relying on the microphone on your iPhone or video camera, will make a world of difference in the final project.

The library has several different types of microphones that you can check out and that will lend a professional touch to your finished product. Learn more:



Tech Tuesday: tripods

Are you filming something for a class project, your student organization, or just for your own artistic expression? Well, unless you’re going for a Blair Witch Project-style camera shake, you will want a tripod.

The library has both floor stand and tabletop tripods in several different sizes and styles that you can check out! Learn more:



New exhibit on the 3rd floor

Never Again poster sampleThe final exhibit of the term is up on the 3rd floor of the library and continues with the term-long theme of ‘NEVER AGAIN’:

Holocaust Posters, 1933-1945
An Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith Poster Exhibit

This evocative poster series begins in pre-Holocaust Europe, when Jewish communities were centers of cultural and social ferment. The ensuing horror is unforgettably invoked in these posters, which portray a word gone mad and another world isolated and destroyed.

Exhibit Dates: November 7 – December 11

Txt us ur ?s

Text your questions to the libraryDid you know that we can answer your questions via text? Whether you need help reserving a study room, want to know the library’s hours, or want some guidance on a research assignment, you can do it all on your phone.
Text us at 503-383-WOU1 (9681).

If you tried to use the text service recently and had trouble, we were having some technical difficulties. But fear not, they have all been resolved and we’re ready to answer your texts again.

Tlk 2 u l8er! 😉

Ask for a librarian when you need research help

Your WOU librarians are here to help you learn how to do college-level research so that you can complete your class assignments. There is no question too simple or too complicated to come to us with. Here are some examples of the types of questions we commonly help students with:

–How do I find articles that are “peer-reviewed” for my research paper – and what does “peer-review” even mean?
–I only have the title for an article I’m supposed to find – can you help me?
–How do I cite this article/conference presentation/blog post using proper APA style?
–How do I find primary sources regarding German agriculture before and after the Industrial Revolution? We love helping with wild questions like this. (Seriously, we do.)

You can always ask directly for the available librarian at the Information Desk, or you can schedule an appointment with the librarian appropriate to your subject area. You can also consult the subject or class-specific research guides compiled by your librarians. Good luck with mid-terms!

New exhibit now open: Hiroshima Ground Zero

Hiroshima Ground ZeroThe second of the featured traveling exhibits making a stop at Hamersly Library this fall is open for visitors. The Hiroshima Ground Zero exhibit is made up of a series of posters from the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum in Japan that inform of the aftermath and effects of nuclear weapons. Designed for schools and suitable for all ages, the posters promote peace through education.

The exhibit will run from Friday, October 16th – Sunday, November 1st on the 3rd floor of the library. In conjunction with the exhibit, we will be hosting a lecture from Hiroshima survivor, Ed Kawasaki of Portland on Wednesday, October 28th at 4:00 p.m. in HL 107. See a full schedule of events here.

Watch Tim Wise’s film “White Like Me” for free

white like meProminent anti-racist writer and educator Tim Wise is coming to campus to speak on Tuesday, Oct 13th at 4pm in the WUC Pacific Room.

In addition to his books, many of which are available through the library, Wise has also been featured in several documentaries, including the 2013 Media Education Foundation release, “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America.” As a WOU student, faculty, or staff, you can stream this film through the library.

The film, which Wise co-wrote and co-produced, has been called “A phenomenal educational tool in the struggle against racism,” and “One of the best films made on the unfinished quest for racial justice,” by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva of Duke University, and Robert Jensen of the University of Texas, respectively. Learn more.