Stream videos for class or fun with ‘Films on Demand’

films on demandWatch online streaming videos about everything from biographies of famous musicians to the history of unions in the U.S. to tips for writing fiction from famous writers (and much more!) for free. Use the videos in Films on Demand for class, to learn something new, or just to satisfy your curiosity.

Films On Demand is almost like the library’s version of YouTube, except it’s all legal and appropriate for use in class assignments!

More about Films on Demand

The vast Films on Demand archive currently includes more than 6,100 complete titles and 63,000 shorter video segments. You can browse by subject, such as Health & Medicine, World Languages, Nursing, Criminal Justice & Law, or Archival Films & Newsreels, under the ‘Collections’ menu option. Or you can simply search for videos using keywords.

Happy watching!

 

The ‘Find it @ WOU’ button is your friend

find it @ wouDoing research for that final paper? Then you’ve probably come across the ‘Find it @ WOU’ button. Often, students are confused about what it does, but it’s a powerful tool that can get you to the articles you need no matter where they’re located. So, it’s worth checking out!

More about 'Find it @ WOU'...

When you click the ‘Find it @ WOU’ button for an article in any WOU database, you will see one of four different scenarios for getting the full text of the article:

  1. A link to another WOU database that has the full-text article
  2. A message that WOU owns the article, but in print. You can either go to the physical shelf in the library where the journal is located and copy or scan your article, or you can choose the ‘Scan and Deliver’ option and we will scan it for you and email it to you as a PDF.
  3. A page or link that says WOU has access to the article via OnDemand. You will either be able to order the article yourself by following the on-screen prompts, or the library may need to order it for you, depending on which option shows up.
  4. A note that WOU does not own the article, but that we can get it from another library if you fill out the WOU Interlibrary Loan form linked from the page.

Find out more about each of these scenarios and see screenshots of what they look like here: http://research.wou.edu/finditatwou

Learn about other countries with ‘A to Z the World’

Thinking about studying abroad? Taking a class with an international focus? Just want to learn about another country? A to Z the World is the database for you.

A to Z the World
Covering 175 countries and territories, A to Z the World is a great resource to learn about social and cultural customs, important travel and business information, and much more. It has a snapshot for each country – from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe – if you just want some quick info, or you can go into more depth on a variety of topics related to each country.

Get the full text – just click ‘Find it @ WOU’

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Sometimes full articles are available directly from the library databases, and you will see this icon:
PDF Full Text
But in many instances, there is no link to the full text of the article, and you only have the summary (or even just the citation information).  This is when you use the ‘Find it @ WOU’ button. It looks like this:
Find it @ WOU
Just click it and you will be taken to a page with information about how to access the full text of your article.
Need more help? Check out our Find it @ WOU tutorial to discover the different ways we might link you to the full text in our electronic sources, to our print sources & Scan & Deliver service, to Articles OnDemand, and to Interlibrary Loan, as appropriate.

What do people think? Find poll results on your topic

Polling the Nations is an online database of public opinion polls containing the full text of 600,000+ questions and responses, from 18,000+ surveys and 1,700+ polling organizations, conducted from 1986 through the present in the United States and more than 100 other countries around the world. Questions cover politics and elections; big issues such as health care, education, and the environment; personal beliefs and household activities such as commuting, prayer and religion, and sleep habits; and opinions of prominent people. All the polls in the database used scientifically selected random samples.

Biography Reference Center

Biography Reference CenterBiography Reference Center serves up detailed and concise biographies, in full-text, from respected reference sources and magazine articles. In addition to searching by name for a known individual, you can discover notable people by searching fields or browsing categories. Search fields include profession or activity, nationality or U.S. ethnicity, gender, lifespan, and places of birth and death.  Over 30 genre categories cluster together people who have commonalities even when their professions diverge: for example, Activists & Reformers, Business Leaders, Obama Administration, or World War II.

Need statistics to support your thesis?

logo for ProQuest Statistical InsightProQuest Statistical Insight provides data from agencies of the federal government, major international intergovernmental organizations, professional and trade organizations, commercial publishers, independent research organizations, state government agencies, and universities. It’s a single search across many authoritative sources.

All I see is the article’s summary–where’s the whole article?

Sometimes full articles are available directly from the library databases.  But in many instances, there is no link to the full text of the article, and you only have the summary (or even just the citation information).  This is when you use the  Find it @ WOU button.

Find it @ WOUSee our Find it @ WOU tutorial to discover how we’ll link you to the full text in our electronic sources, to our print sources & Scan & Deliver service, to Articles OnDemand, and to Interlibrary Loan, as appropriate.

 

Educational Content, Curricula, and Standards

Kraus Curriculum Development Library
Kraus Curriculum Development Library
is a database of educational materials from course content (lesson plans, learning activities) to teacher and administrator strategies, from educational legislation to academic standards by subject and grade level.  The materials come from state departments of education and other government agencies,  as well as local school districts, professional associations, non-profit organizations, and other sources that have educational concerns. Documents published after 2000 are available on the site as PDFs and/or HTML files.