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Dance Department Courses

** To find current courses for the term: Real Time Class Availability

CourseTitleCreditsDescription
D 140Conditioning for Dancers1Conditioning for Dancers (1 each) Participation in physical (and mental) conditioning specifically designed for dancers. This course can be repeated once for credit. Students retaking course may be allowed to participate in their own individualized conditioning programs with instructor supervision. This course does not meet the LACC creative arts requirement.
D 170, 171, 172World Dance 1, 2, 31An introduction to the performance of traditional and popular dance styles from a selection of world dance perspectives. Emphasizing practice and performance, the course examines dance forms in relation to their specific cultural contexts. May be repeated for credit.
D 177, 178, 179Hip Hop 1, 2, 31An introduction to the performance of selected contemporary dance styles from urban-American street dance. To be taken in sequence. May be repeated for credit.
D 180, 181, 182Modern Dance 1, 2, 31 Modern dance technique heightens awareness of the expressive use of the body, builds physical, aesthetic and performance skills, and develops appreciation for the art form of dance. Creative expression, rhythm, movement patterns and dynamics are explored. An introduction to choreographic ideas may also be introduced. To be taken in sequence. May be repeated for credit.
D 185, 186, 178Ballet 1, 2, 31Introduction to the basic concepts of body alignment, the technical movement vocabulary in traditional ballet, the accompanying French terminology and the basic movement sequences that will develop strength and flexibility. To be taken in sequence. May be repeated for credit.
D 188, 189,190Jazz Dance 1, 2, 31
Introduction to the basic concepts of body alignment, the technical movement vocabulary in traditional ballet, the accompanying French terminology and the basic movement sequences that will develop strength and flexibility. To be taken in sequence. May be repeated for credit.
D 196, 197, 198Tap Dance1Introduction to the basic elements of tap dancing steps and techniques in a variety of styles. To be taken in sequence. May be repeated for credit. D 199 Special Studies (1-15) Terms and hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: by consent of instructor only
D 210, 211, 212Modern Dance 4, 5, 62) A continuation of the work outlined for modern dance 1, 2, 3 with emphasis on further development and mastery of technique, creative expressive, rhythmic and performance skills. May be repeated for credit
D 220, 221, 222Ballet 4, 5, 62A continuation of the work outlined for ballet 1, 2, 3 with emphasis on further development and mastery of technique, movement vocabu-lary, alignment and performance skills. May be repeated for credit
D 240Wellness for Dancers3Introduces dance majors to the importance of healthy practices for improved health, well being, and dance performance. A series of individual assessments and health screenings will be conducted for dancers to gain knowledge of their current practices and as a basis for designing programs for optimal wellness and performance. This course does not meet the LACC creative arts requirement.
D 250Drumming for Dancers1 - 3Course utilizes West African rhythms to develop the auditory skills for dancers to translate both oral and written drumming notation into kinesthetic expression. Dancers will develop skills that directly inform and support dance technique, choreography and pedagogy.
D 251Introduction to Dance3Introduces the origins of the various forms of dance, such as ballet, modern, musical theatre, jazz, tap, folk and popular dance forms. Also examined will be how and why people dance as well as how and why people watch dance.
D 260Dance Improvisation1Explorations to foster movement invention and spontaneity, including structured and open improvisations incorporating other media such as music, text and props. Concurrent registration in a dance technique class is strongly advised.
D 270Dance Partnering1 - 3D 270 Dance Partnering (1-3) Provides fundamental skills for beginning and intermediate partnering work with an emphasis on personal safety and creativity. Based on biomechanical principles, students develop skills to facilitate partnering interactions utilizing learned partnering vocabulary and sequences.
D 277, 278, 279Hip Hop 4, 5, 62Further study of selected contemporary dance styles from urban-American street dance. May be repeated for credit.
D 280, 281, 282Modern Dance 7, 8, 92Continuation with development of modern dance style and technique, expanding movement vocabulary, improvisational work, personal expression and performance quality. May be repeated for credit.
D 285, 286, 287Ballet 7, 8, 92) Introduction of a more advanced level of adagio, barre, petite and grande allegro. Emphasis will be placed on work in the center and across-the-floor combinations. May be repeated for credit.
D 288, 289, 290Jazz Dance 4, 5, 62Introduction to a more advanced level of technique focusing on rhythm, syncopation and body isolations. Various styles of jazz dance will be explored. May be repeated for credit.
D 296, 297, 298Tap Dance 4, 5, 62Further study of selected contemporary tap dance with an emphasis on developing longer and more complex rhythms and movement styles. May be repeated for credit.
D 300Human Movement Notation3A survey of notation methods used for the recording and analysis of basic movements of the human body. The methods will include: Labanotation, computer generated notation and video notation. These methods are applicable to those fields in which there is a need to record human motion: dance, athletics, anthropology and physiotherapy.
D 301, 302, 303Pointe Technique 1, 2, 31This course will introduce basic classical ballet vocabulary and pointe technique, historical perspectives, anatomy, as well as prevention of pointe related injuries. May be repeated for credit.
D 310Dance & Gender3Will analyze dance and choreography through the lens of gender and it’s effects on the development of dance as an art form.
D 330Rhythmic Awareness3Exploration of the musical components of rhythm in relation to dance. Elements such as beat, meter and form are studied and developed in the context of movement and choreography. Also explored is the potential for collaboration between dancers and musicians and basic elements of rhythmic notation.
D 351Dance Composition I3Dance Composition I (3) This course will explore choreographic concepts as they relate to the elements of space, time and force. Emphasis will be placed on solo compositions. Prerequisite: Dance Improvisation
D 352Dance Composition II3This course will explore choreographic concepts as they relate to the elements of spatial design, musical form, character study and textural differences. Prerequisite: D 351
D 357Dance in Musical Theatre3Examines the development of musical theatre dance from the 19th century to present. Includes selected choreographers, their works and the role they played in the development of American musical theatre.
D 376, 377, 378Ballet 10, 11, 122Further development and mastery of advanced barre, adagio, petit and grand allegro technique. Emphasis will be placed on an advanced pre-professional level of technical and performance skills. May be repeated for credit
D 380, 381, 382Modern Dance 10, 11, 122Advanced study with emphasis on a higher level of technical, improvisational, personal expression and performance skills. May be repeated for credit.
D 390Kinesiology For Dance3Survey of kinesiology principles as related to basic movement. The areas stressed are anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, movement behavior, and various alignment and conditioning techniques. Students become aware of their personal movement behavior and investigate ways of becoming movement efficient.
D 399Special Studies: Dance Concert and/or Musicl1 - 3 Participation, by performing or crewing, in a dance concert or musical theatre production. By audition only. May be repeated for credit. Eligible for the RP grade option.
D 405Senior Project2Each graduating senior with a B.A./B.S. in dance or a B.A./B.S. in the arts with a dance emphasis will complete a final capstone experi-ence on a selected topic in the field of dance. Students are responsible for the creation, rehearsal, research and the project presentation. Eligible for the RP grade option.
D 406Independent Studies in Dance1 - 3) For students who wish to study in depth selected topics in dance history, theory, education or criticism. Only 3 credit hours of D 406 and D 408, singly or combined, count as electives in the dance minor. May be repeated for credit. Eligible for the RP grade option. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
D 407Seminar1 - 15Terms and hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit. D 408 Workshop (1-15) Terms and hours to be arranged. (To allow for various workshops in dance, i.e., Pas de Deux, men’s techniques, African dance, etc.) May be repeated for credit.
D 409Internship1 - 6Terms and hours to be arranged. Supervised practical experience in a professional dance field. Such experiences may include performing in a dance company, teaching at a dance studio/school and choreographing for studios or companies or schools. May be repeated for credit. Eligible for the RP grade option.
D 450Dance Repertory1 - 3Intermediate and advanced students have an opportunity to work with regionally and/ or nationally renowned guest artists who set repertory works, historical works or create new work on WOU dance students. The piece will be performed in the annual dance concert at WOU and is often performed and adjudicated at the regional American College Dance Festival. By audition only. May be repeated for credit. Eligible for the RP grade option.
D 451Dance Production3Provides the practical and theoretical knowledge of the various areas of dance production. Included will be practical experience in sound production, lighting, costume, makeup, management and publicity.
D 451LDance Production Lab1Designed to give students a hands-on experience in the study and practical application of the aesthetic and technical aspects of the production of a dance concert. To be taken concurrently with D 451.
D 453Ballet History3Covers development of ballet from its roots in the Renaissance Courts through the Romantic and Classical eras to the present.
D 454Evolution of Modern Dance3Covers the development of modern dance and the philosophies of the leading modern dancers of the 20th century from Duncan to the present.
D 455Group Choreography3Examines the use of groups of dancers as they relate to design, shape , focus, space and balance. Introduction to and experience with formal dance structure will be included as well as analysis and evaluation of well known choreographic works. Other special considerations of group choreography will also be addressed. Prerequisites: D 352
D 460Dance & Technology3Introduction to the use of desktop multimedia applications and peripherals applied specifically to dance production and the creative process.
D 491Creative Dance for Children3Course explores dance concepts and expressive movement. Included will be how creative movement develops creativity, supports learning in other subject areas and fosters understanding of other cultures at an elementary education level.
D493/593Dance for the Classroom from Around the World3Study and experience ethnic dances from various geographical and cultural areas of the world. These dances will be examined in relationship to their cultural context and relevance within the given society.
D 494Dance Pedagogy3Study and evaluation of methods and materials for teaching dance in a studio setting. The topics examined include: how to build a dance class, what to teach and methodology involved. Practical application of the methods will be emphasized.
D 496Creativity3) Explores the mind/body connection as an integral link in the creative process as it relates to the creation of art, health, well-being, and an overall life perspective.
 

Contact:

Department of Theatre/Dance

503-838-8461    l    email: janovid@wou.edu    l   Rice Auditorium (RA 105)  Box Office Phone: 503-838-8462