Soap Box Prints 2:
Prints, Politics & Democracy September - December 2009

This American Print Alliance exhibit demonstrates printmaking’s vital role in social and political discourse. Using traditional techniques and new innovations, today’s artists use this easily disseminated and most democratic art to encourage every-one to take part in government of, by and for the people.

Twenty-eight prints were selected based on the expression of ideas and quality of the work. No attempt was made to balance artists from different parts of the country, various techniques, or liberal or conservative ideas. Works were chosen by Alliance director Dr. Carol Pulin to create an exhibition that is visually exciting, with multiple viewpoints that are thought provoking and even confrontational. The exhibition itself demonstrates that prints can have an influential role in the democratic process.

Soap Box   1. A carton or crate used to hold soap.   2. A temporary platform like a shipping crate on which one stands while making a spontaneous and often impassioned public speech or call for action.

Artists interpreted the exhibition theme broadly to include the principles, rights and responsibilities of democracy. Prints can inspire people to defend their freedoms (of speech and the press, religion, etc.), demonstrate for fair governance, serve in elected office, vote and engage in political life. Artwork was not rejected for being controversial or not reflecting the views and opinions of the Alliance's director and board of representatives. As a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, the Alliance may not campaign for or against candidates for office, and we asked artists to choose subjects that looked beyond the 2008 elections.

The above information was taken directly from the American Print Alliance website. Visit the website to see detail images of the prints selected in this exhibit.

 

LOCATION: 2rd Floor Lobby
CURATOR: Amy Reynolds and Marissa Clausen, WOU Art Student
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This page was modified January 25, 2010 mtc.