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Graduate Programs

MS in Rehabilitation & Mental Health Counseling
Empowering individuals for sustainable living
  1. About
  2. Admission
  3. Courses
  4. Cost
  5. Faculty

MS RMHC curriculum overview overview:

Program core course requirements for the RC track begins the fall term each year and requires a minimum of seven sequential terms, including one summer term. The RCD and MHC tracks may be required to take additional courses in the summer. Most full-time RC and RCD student complete the program by June of their second year of studies. Courses are offered in three major areas: counseling theories and assessment, career and employment, and clinical experience. All three tracks take their core classes together.

CAUTION: Due to the intensity of full-time graduate coursework and assignments, students are asked NOT to work more than 20 hours per week their first year of study. Internship (winter and spring terms of year 2) requires 32-35 hours a week to successfully complete 600 clock hours including 240 direct client contact hours.

Your plan of study:

Once admitted to MS RMCH , you will work with an advisor to plan the courses you will take and how you will complete the academic requirements of the program. By filing this Program Plan (PDF form), you have a road map for completing your degree and clarity on what to expect.

 

 Courses and Course Sequencing for the MS RMHC program

 Courses for the MS in Ed: Curriculum and Instruction program

Courses normally taken during the first fall term are:

  • RC 632 Psychosocial and Environmental Aspects of Disability
  • RC 611 Introduction to the Helping Profession
  • RC 620 Professional Orientation to Rehabilitation Services and Resources
  • RC 625 Rehabilitation Counseling Research

Courses normally taken during the first winter term are:

  • RC 609 Practicum
  • RC 612 Counseling Theory and Techniques
  • RC 621 Job Development, Placement, and Retention
  • RC 633 Social and Cultural Diversity Issues in Rehabilitation Counseling

Courses normally taken during the first spring term are:

  • RC 522 Medical and Functional Aspects in Rehabilitation
  • RC 609 Practicum
  • RC 613 Lifestyle and Career Development
  • RC 634 Diagnosis/Treatment of Mental Illness in Rehabilitation

Courses normally taken during the summer term are four mornings per week:

  • RC 630 Group Work (2 credit hours)
  • RC 630L Group Lab (1 credit hour)
  • RC 631 Family, Disability, and Lifespan Development
  • RC 662 Measurement and Assessment Procedures in Deafness and Rehabilitation

Courses normally taken during the second fall term are:

  • RC 607 Seminar: Portfolio
  • RC 607 Transition and Self Determination in Rehabilitation
  • RC 609 Advanced Practicum
  • RC 650 Ethical Issues in Rehabilitation Counseling
  • RC 660 Case Management

Course normally taken during the second winter and spring terms :

  • RC 610 Internship (9 credit hours)

Courses required for Mental Health Counseling (MHC) track:

  • PSY 561 Psychopharmacology (4 credit hours)
  • PSY 607 Drug and Alcohol Assessment (4 credit hours)
  • PSY 607 Crisis Assessment and Intervention (1 credit hour)

NOTE : One-credit seminars are offered on a rotating basis specific to RC issues, (e.g., Assistive Technology/Worksite Modification; Rehabilitation Counseling with Special Populations such as Dual Diagnosis and Ex Offender; Self-Employment) and includes student participants who are employed as rehabilitation counselors.

Graduate Interns are expected to apply all of their knowledge and skills within the context of a full-time internship (RC 610) in a rehabilitation setting with clients who represent a variety of disability groups. RCD students are expected to complete their internship in a setting serving Deaf and Hard of Hearing clients. This will allow generalization of skills learned the first 6 terms, into a rehabilitation organization.

Educationally focused practicum
Approximately one-third of the program is comprised of practical/internship designed to give the student a clinically based experience with rehabilitation and independent living services designed for clients with various and severe disabilities. An excellent relationship exists through the program's advisory structure with the Oregon Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (OVRS), the Washington State Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (WA DVR), the Oregon Disabilities Commission, consumer groups, and CARF accredited community rehabilitation programs in Oregon . The program faculty adheres to CORE practicum standards and actively maintains contact with a variety of programs serving persons who are Deaf or have disabilities such as:

  • state offices of vocational rehabilitation;
  • state training schools and rehabilitation centers;
  • commission for the blind;
  • culturally (economically) disadvantaged populations;
  • disability consumer organizations;
  • veteran's administration vocational rehabilitation counseling;
  • independent living centers and/or agencies;
  • secondary and post-secondary offices that provide services to students who are Deaf and/or have mental or physical disabilities

Prospects after graduation
Over the past five years, 96-100 percent of our graduates were employed in appropriate professional fields within six months of graduation. Retention in the field of rehabilitation remains at 94 percent up to five years after graduation.

 

 Course Descriptions

 Course Descriptions

Prerequisite: consent of program coordinator RC 407/507 Seminar (1-9)

Terms and hours to be arranged.

 

RC 409 Advanced Practicum III (1-3)

Third or advanced supervised field experience designed for undergraduate students exploring the rehabilitation counseling profession. Prerequisite: consent of program coordinator

 

RC 422/522 Medical and Functional Aspects of Disability in Rehabilitation (3)

Overview of both medical and functional aspects of disability in rehabilitation. Examines the most common illnesses and disabilities encountered for case management in rehabilitation-related settings. Included is an overview of environmental/attitudinal barriers of various disabling conditions, focusing on young adult through mature adult populations; basic medical terminology, etiology, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of various diseases and health issues resulting in disability, and medical information needed to facilitate service delivery for persons with disabilities. Students will be introduced to the functional aspects of disability and possible resources for an individual who may need rehabilitation engineering and/or technology services.

 

RC 475/575 Hearing Loss and Assistive Technology (1)

Provides students with an understanding of the impact of hearing loss on access to oral/ aural communication, and exposes students to a wide range of technology that can improve communication access for individuals experiencing hearing loss across a variety of settings (e.g., employment, education, postsecondary, home, and recreation). Samples of assistive listening, speech-to-text, telecommunication, alerting devices will be demonstrated. Use of interpreters will also be discussed

 

RC 476/576 Professional Identity in Rehabilitation Counseling (1)

Provides an overall orientation to graduate studies in the rehabilitation counseling education (RCE) program at WOU. Students will have opportunity to learn about both state and national professional organizations as well as counselor licensure and certification programs.

 

RC 490/590 Professional Issues: Rehabilitation Counseling with Deaf Clients (3)

Course will assist students in becoming aware of the specialized issues found in doing vocational (and related) counseling with Deaf, Deaf-Blind and Hard of Hearing individuals. Upon completing this course, students will have an understand of the psychological, social and vocational implications of having a hearing loss and will have experienced an extensive review of the rehabilitation service system's response to the unique needs of people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Students will also be familiar with legal, governmental and online resources related to service provision with this population.

 

RC 606 Special Projects (1-9)

Terms and hours to be arranged.

 

RC 607 Seminar (1-9)

Terms and hours to be arranged.

 

RC 608 Workshop (1-6)

Terms and hours to be arranged. rehabilitation counseling

 

RC 609 Practicum (3)

Provides an opportunity to apply basic counseling skills in a relatively safe environment. Will meet weekly and includes analysis and feedback regarding students' counseling skills development as well as peer review. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 610 Internship (18 minimum)

Students perform two full-terms (9 credits per term) of on-site placement with a state or community rehabilitation counseling agency or social service agency charged with meeting the specific rehabilitation needs of clients. Total internship will consist of a minimum of 18 credit hours which includes 600 hours of counselor-in-training experience and 240 hours of direct client contact. CRC supervision is a required portion of internship experience. Prerequisites: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 611 Introduction to the Helping Profession (3)

First in a series of three courses that present theories and techniques for effective counseling in the field of rehabilitation. This course designed to provide an in-depth study of problem-management counseling approach to counseling that can be applied to numerous disciplines in rehabilitation counseling when working with clients who are Deaf or who have disabilities. Formation of general interpersonal skills and basic helping relationships is stressed. Students will begin to develop an understanding of his or her own personality and belief system and how it may affect the provision of professional services to individuals who are Deaf or who have disabilities. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 612 Theory and Techniques of Counseling (3)

Overview of a variety of contrasting theoretical counseling models underlying both individual and group practice in counseling. Second of three courses that present theories and techniques used in effective rehabilitation counseling. Emphasis is placed on the appropriateness of selected theories when counseling persons with disabilities. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 613 Lifestyle and Career Development (3)

Explores the foundational issues of work, principles of human and career development, and major career counseling theories as applied to different stages in life (early childhood to senior adult). Course will address the significance of lifestyle and career decision making processes. The integration of career development and counseling theories will be considered for a "whole person" approach to persons with disabilities. Special attention will be given to the impact of developmental, environmental, and attiudinal barriers faced by persons with disabilities in the career development process. Ethnic, racial, social, and gender issues related to career development will be considered. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 620 Professional Orientation to Rehabilitation Services and Resources (3)

Introductory overview of the professional field of rehabilitation counseling. A historical context is used as a foundation for the way service is currently delivered. The steps involved in the development of the Vocational Rehabilitation case file and various philosophical and service delivery models are reviewed. Additional, the roles and perspectives of various members in the rehabilitation, counseling field are explored. Practical tools and resources are taught and developed along with projects aimed at hands on application. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 621 Job Development, Placement and Retention (3)

Examines job development and placement techniques that assist individuals with disabilities in achieving and retaining meaningful employment. Relevant factors to be explored include: transferable skills analysis, work site modification, job readiness, job search skills, job coaching, and work hardening. Job placement strategies discussed will include effective employer consultation and networking strategies with community agencies. The placement process presented will include focus on guiding persons with disabilities toward informed choice and personal vocational goal attainment. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 625 Rehabilitation Counseling Research (3)

Course will assist the rehabilitation counseling student in developing the required skills in the area of research that are needed for evidence based practice. Students are expected to gain knowledge and skills in the following areas: literature review; research critique; basic statistics; research methods; and ethical, legal, and cultural issues related to research and evaluation. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 630 Group Work (2)

The primary objective in this course is to increase student knowledge of background, theory and processes in groups. In addition, the student concurrently takes RC 630L to experience practical application of group theory and techniques by participating as a member in 10 hours of group sessions. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 630L Group Work Lab (1)

Group counseling lab, to be taken concurrently with RC 630, offers students an opportunity to experience group theories, observe techniques, and enter into self-introspection in a group setting. All discussion and personal sharing will be kept strictly confidential within the group. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 631 Family, Disability, and Life Span Development (3)

Provides an understanding of the nature and needs of individuals at all developmental levels, from birth to old age. Family systems and families who have members who are Deaf or who have disabilities will be explored. Topics will include: (a) a general overview of the expanded family life cycle; (b) an explanation of Erikson's psychosocial developmental stages; (c) introduction of family counseling theories and clinical application; (d) use of genograms to track family history through the family life cycle; and (e) understanding of how diverse characteristics including gender, spirituality, age, ethnic or cultural background, sexual orientation, and socio-economic status impact the family throughout the life span. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 632 Psychosocial and Environmental Aspects of Disability (3)

Analysis of the psychological and social impact of disability from an individual, family, community perspective. Experiential class activities will focus on building understanding and empathy while considering what influence Rehabilitation Counselors have on people who are Deaf and/or have disabilities. It will include analysis of how persons with disabilities are affected by the psychosocial influences, cultural and spiritual beliefs, attitudes, values and environmental factors, as well as the diversity issues of their environment. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 633 Social and Cultural Diversity Issues in Rehabilitation Counseling (3)

Intended to increase student's understanding of issues and dynamics when providing rehabilitation counseling across social, cultural and community lines. Students will explore the nature of society and culture and how these impact the rehabilitation counseling process. Emphasis is placed on students examining their own cultural identity, attitudes, and biases. Attention will be given to developing understanding of gender, class, race, ethnicity, disability, family structure, roles and values, and various lifestyles. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 634 Diagnosis and Treatment of Mental Illness in Rehabilitation (3)

Designed to help broaden students' knowledge and conceptual understanding of diagnosis and treatment of mental illness in a rehabilitation setting. Students will be introduced to how to read a psychological evaluation and make general diagnostic decisions using the current DSM. Course will focus on the diagnosis of prevalent mental illness disorders encountered by rehabilitation counselors including how to compose short and long-term treatment plans. Emphasis will be on culturally competent and gender sociolo gy specific interventions, and special mental health issues for groups who have been subject to oppression such as those with other physical, sensory, or mental disabilities. Prerequisite: admission to REC program or consent of instructor

 

RC 650 Ethics and Issues in Rehabilitation Counseling (3)

Overview of the professional and ethical principals applied to rehabilitation casework, organization policy, and disability law. A counselor's responsibilities and duties will be explored in the context of the CRCC and other codes of ethics specific to the rehabilitation counseling field. Ethical decision making models will be reviewed and applied. Relevant factors to be explore include: managing boundaries, confidentiality, professional training, supervision, advocacy, and multicultural competency. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 660 Caseload Management in Rehabilitation Counseling (3)

Examines strategies for providing effective and efficient case management services for persons with disabilities in a rehabilitation agency. Case and caseload management principles and systems within rehabilitation services will be explored. Contemporary issues faced by the rehabilitation counselor managing a caseload of clients who are Deaf and/or have disabilities will be discussed and practiced, e.g. counselor preparedness, client intake, eligibility determination, financial participation, vocational assessment, and individualized plan development; maintaining confidential file information; counselor certification and ethics; and case management with specialized client caseloads (e.g. clients with hearing loss or clients who have mental illness). Crisis management tools and conflict resolution strategies as well as time management principles will be examined in promoting the counselors' ability to successfully manage a full caseload of clients with severe disabilities. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

RC 662 Measurement and Assessment Procedures in Deafness and in Rehabilitation (3)

Examines the selection, administration and interpretation of various psychological, achievement and interest instruments used with persons who have disabilities or who are Deaf or hard of hearing. Students will also become aware of various resources that are available in the rehabilitation community. Prerequisite: admission to RCE program or consent of instructor

 

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