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Graduate Programs

Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies
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MA in Interpreting Studies curriculum overview:

The program consists of 55 to 59 credits in advanced interpreting theory and practice with an emphasis in Teaching Interpreting. Individuals who are already seasoned and/or credentialed interpreters, will take courses primarily online to enhance their experience and knowledge. Students will complete a 4-creidt course in internship and portfolio or student teaching and portfolio.

Your plan of study:

Once admitted to MA in Interpreting Studies, you will work with an advisor to plan the courses you will take and how you will complete the academic requirements of the program. By filing this Program Plan (PDF form), you have a road map for completing your degree and clarity on what to expect.

 Courses for the MA in Interpreting Studies program

 Courses for the MA in Interpreting Studies program:

Interpreting Core (32 credits)

ED 611 Theories of Teaching and Learning

ED 633 Research and Writing (pre.req. 611)

ED 635 Action Research (pre. req. 633)

INT 523 Technology in Interpreting/Interpreter Education

INT 612 Proseminar

INT 618 Ethics and Professional Practice

INT 624 Teaching and Technology

INT 625 Interpreting as Practice Profession

INT 630 Communication in Professional Practice

INT 645 Research on Translation and Interpretation

INT 670 Leadership in Interpreting Education

INT 609 Practicum

 

Teaching Interpreting Core (13 credits)

INT 640 Teaching Ethics and Professional Practice

INT 650 Teaching Meaning Transfer

INT 655 Assessment for Interpreter Educators

INT 665 Interpreter Education Curriculum Development

INT 675 Adult Education

 

Additional Requirements for emphasis in Interpreting (4 credits)

INT 610 Internship and Portfolio

 

Additional Requirements for emphasis in Teaching Interpreting (4 credits)

INT 639 Student Teaching and Portfolio

 

Exit Requirements (6 credits)

INT 603 Thesis, Professional Project, and/or Field Study

 

Electives (not a requirement)

INT 606 Special Individual Studies (1-3)

INT 607 Seminar (1-3)

INT 608 Workshop (1-3)

 

 Course Sequence

 Course Sequence

Full-time Course Sequence:
Year One
Summer (9) Fall (9) Winter (9) Spring (9)

ED 611 Theories of Teaching & Learning

ED 633 Research and Writing ED 635 Action Research INT 645 Research on Translation & Interpretation
INT 625 Interpreting as Practice Profession INT 675 Adult Education INT 630 Communication in a Practice Profession INT 650 Teaching Meaning Transfer
INT 523 Technology in Interpreting/Interpreter Education INT 618 Ethics & Professional Practice INT 665 Interpreter Educational Curriculum Development INT 640 Teaching Ethics and Professional Practice
INT 612 Proseminar     INT 609 Practicum (2)

Full-time Course Sequence:
Year Two

Summer (9) Fall (10)
INT 670 Leadership Roles in the Field of Interpreting INT 639 Student Teaching and Portfolio or
INT 655 Assessment for Interpreter Educators INT 610 Internship & Portfolio
INT 624 Teaching and Technology INT 603 Thesis, Professional, Project and/or Field Study
ED 609 Practicum (2)  
 

 Course Descriptions

 Course Descriptions

INT 618: Ethics and Professional Practice (3 credits) Students examine Demand-Control theory and its relevance to occupational health, implications on stress, work effectiveness, and ethical decision-making. They will also examine demand-control schema and its application to interpreting as a practice profession. Students research and identify the elements of supervision as practitioners as well as mentors/instructors (constructive dialogue to improve the interpreting work product). In this course, students examine current professional and ethical decision-making practices, and explore the application of demand-control schema to professional and ethical practices.

INT 612: Proseminar (1 credit) Provides a foundation for inquiry about interpreting studies issues through critical reading, analytical writing, and thoughtful, collegial discussion. Students will receive general training relevant to graduate work in interpreting studies, such as technical writing, sampling and experimenting with technology used during the program.

INT 615: Communication for Interpreters (3 credits) In this course, students will examine interpersonal communication and discuss the role of an interpreter. Students will practice and apply principles of invention, organization, language, and delivery with focus on the development of skill and confidence in interpersonal communication (e.g., varied contexts/styles/ registers/topics) in English and in ASL. Students analyze and evaluate speeches in public settings; critically study invention, arrangement, and style.

INT 624: Teaching and Technology (1 credit) Students will explore new and emerging technologies used to enhance student engagement. Both synchronous and asynchronous methods will be discussed. Course will provide students with hands on experience in designing individual and collaborative student learning experiences.

INT 625: Interpreting as a Practice Profession (3 credits) In this advanced course, students examine the theory, practice, application, and evaluation of translation studies and the application to translation work between signed and spoken languages, in general, and, specifically, between ASL and English. DC-S supervision is applied to translation tasks and performances.

INT 630: Communication in a Practice Profession (3 credits) In this course, students will practice and apply the principles of interpretation/translation to interpersonal communication via the demand control schema constructs. Students will incorporate the practicum observations, supervision sessions (case conferencing) and hands-up practice to enhance students' skills in decision-making around meaning transfer, ethical dilemmas, and interpersonal communication.

INT 609: Practicum (4 credits) Students apply theory in various professional settings. Students will participate in DC-S observation, practice (when appropriate), and supervision. Observation encompasses interpreting between spoken languages and between signed and spoken languages. Interpreting settings may include: community, deaf blind, legal/court, medical, mental health, preK-12, post secondary, video relay, and video remote.

INT 670: Leadership Roles in the Field of Interpreting (3 credits) Students analyze local, national, and global trends in leadership practices for translators and interpreters. Focus is also on role definitions, training and supervision of interpreters and support staff, and materials needed. Students gain skills and knowledge to act as mentors and resources for less experienced and entry-level interpreters. Students examine the dynamics of discussion; group thinking and decision-making; interpersonal relations; types of leadership and the application of discussion techniques in society and interpreted events.

Research Courses

INT 611: Research on Translation and Interpretation (3 credits) Students research translation and interpretation theory. Students examine this body of research and evaluate the methods, findings, and implications. They propose and begin to conduct a research project that is qualitative, quantitative, and/or action based.

Teaching Interpreting Courses

INT 640: Teaching Ethics & Professional Practice (2 credits) Students develop teaching and assessing methods that infuse DC-S into the instruction of ethics & professionalism. They examine the ways DC-S may be infused into theory and practice courses and design curriculum. Students explore and apply theories and approaches of assessment in teaching ethics & professionalism, to include the following: authentic assessment and instructor, peer and self, feedback via professional supervision.

INT 645: Research on Translation and Interpretation (3 credits) Students research translation and interpretation theory. Students examine this body of research and evaluate the methods, findings, and implications. They propose and begin to conduct a research project that is qualitative, quantitative, and/or action based.

INT 650: Teaching Meaning Transfer (2 credits) Students prepare to teach and assess translation, consecutive interpreting, and simultaneous interpreting. They use self-assessment, self-reflection, and research-based practices in teaching design and implementation. They examine, develop, and/or administer assessments, and interpret assessment results.

INT 655: Assessment for Interpreter Educators (3 credits) Students acquire knowledge and theory in assessment construction, methodology, and the use of data in formative and summative assessment design. Students research methods used for curricular and program assessment and evaluation. They examine, develop, and/or administer assessments, and interpret assessment results. Students explore and apply theories and approaches of assessment in teaching interpreting, to include the following: authentic assessment, diagnostics, feedback, and self-assessment.

INT 665: Interpreter Education Curriculum Development (3 credits) This course examines recent scholarship on teaching and instruction as it pertains to adult students. Students will learn specific approaches and methods for classroom management and facilitation, as well as train-the-trainer techniques. Topics include establishing an outline and instructional objectives, assessing student performance, developing instructional technology, platform and presentation skills, and addressing difficult issues.

Students in this course will consider a number of strategies for curriculum development ranging from lesson design to program design. This will be a course where students will examine the various tools available to the new instructor in order for him/her to develop their own individualized means of curriculum development.

INT 675: Adult Education (3 credits) Students will explore the realities of adults as learners and the value of co-constructing the learning environment with students. Adult learning theories will be discussed and analyzed as well as various models for approaching adults as learners in the college classroom (whether live or on-line).

Additional Requirement for emphasis in Interpreting Studies

INT 610: Internship & Portfolio (4 credits) Provide advanced interpreting students and interpreter educators the opportunity to demonstrate interpreting, teaching, and other professional competencies acquired during their training. Competencies will be demonstrated during daily work activities in classroom and interpreting settings. Interns will have on-site supervision by appropriately trained and certified professionals.

Additional Requirement for emphasis in Teaching Interpreting

INT 639: Student Teaching & Portfolio (4 credits) Students teach in a pre-service or in-service interpreter education setting that fits the student’s interest and skill sets. During this experience, students will develop a teaching work sample and conduct an action research project. Students will complete 180 contact hours and participate in a seminar over a ten-week period. Students prepare and defend a professional portfolio.

Exit Requirements

INT 603, INT 606, INT 607, INT 608: (3 credits) Terms and hours to be arranged

 

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