chirico-04X

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Courses of study

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Introductory courses in ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and logic comprise the core of the course of study for both majors and minors in philosophy. A capstone tutorial and a series of courses in the history of philosophy that provide students with a solid grounding in the history of philosophy are also required of both majors and minors. While majors and minors are both able to take a number of elective courses in the areas of philosophy of science, law, happiness, music, and art, majors have considerably greater freedom to pursue those elective offerings.

 

•  The Philosophy Major

 The Philosophy Minor                                                           

 

 

 

  • Philosophy component of the Honors Program
  • Philosophy + Religious studies | LACC

The mission of the Philosophy component of the Honors Program is to cultivate within students a thoughtful, informed, and critically reflective intellectual conscience by way of exposure to the questioning and dialectical development of ideas that make up the history of Western philosophy.

Requirements:

The 6 hour sequence in honors philosophy, Phl 201H and 202H.

Expected learning outcomes:

    • The student shall have an introductory knowledge of most of the major figures, philosophies, and relationships between them that constitute the history of Western philosophy, and of its interaction with religion in the West.
    • The student shall have experienced sustained participation in an ongoing community of philosophical inquiry, in which s/he learns by interpersonal practice and peer reinforcement the skills and dispositions of critical philosophical reasoning.
    • The student shall know what philosophical questions are, and what philosophical inquiry is and how to pursue it (e.g., in clarifying ideas) with some effectiveness when it is called for.
    • The student shall have developed the ability to interpret, reconstruct, and explain accurately and fairly a philosophical position other than her/his own, even when disagreeing with it.
    • The student shall have developed skill in the analysis and critical evaluation of arguments, in argument construction, and in exhibiting these skills in relation to positions of differing assumption and perspective.
    • The student shall have an introductory acquaintance with two or more subdisciplines of philosophy (epistemology {theory of knowledge}, metaphysics {theory of what is}, ethics, logic, or social philosophy), their basic questions, and some of the major alternative positions on those questions.
  • The student shall have a comprehension of the philosophic unsoundness of naive relativism and a knowledge of logical strategies for demonstrating its unsoundness.

The mission of the LACC requirement in Philosophy or Religious Studies is to cultivate within students a thoughtful, informed, and critically reflective intellectual conscience either by way of exposure to the questioning and dialectical development of ideas that exemplify one subfield of the Western tradition of philosophy (the pursuit of wisdom and truth) at its best or by way of immersion in an empathetically objective approach to learning about the great religious traditions of the world alongside one another.

Requirements:

any 3 hour Philosophy course or Religious Studies course (100-200 level only)

Expected learning outcomes:  For the LACC course in philosophy

    • The student shall exhibit critical thinking skills and a thoughtful sensibility when reasoning with other persons.
    • The student shall be able to discriminate between good reasoning and poor reasoning, and know what adequate rational backing for a claim involves.
    • The student shall be able to recognize and counteract prejudicial reaction and presumption in herself/himself and others.
    • The student shall be able to recognize, empathetically comprehend, and represent accurately the basic assumptions and world view exhibited in given intellectual position in contrast/comparison with her/his own.
    • The student shall know what philosophical questions are, and what philosophical inquiry is and how to pursue it (e.g., in clarifying ideas) with some effectiveness when it is called for.
    • The student shall have an introductory acquaintance with at least one subfield of philosophy, its basic questions, and some of the major alternative positions on those questions.
  • The student shall have a comprehension of the philosophic unsoundness of naive relativism and a knowledge of logical strategies for demonstrating its unsoundness.

For the LACC course in religious studies

    • The student shall have a basic knowledge and understanding of several of the major religious traditions of the world and of the full variety of human religious phenomena, and be able to counteract and correct distorted preconceptions about them.
    • The student shall have the ability to carry out empathetically objective research and interpretation of religious phenomena.
    • The student shall have the ability to discriminate among competing interpretations of religious phenomena as to their empathetic objectivity and factual soundness
    • The student shall be able to recognize and counteract prejudicial reaction and presumption in herself/himself and others.
  • The student shall be able to recognize, empathetically comprehend, and represent accurately the basic assumptions and world view exhibited in given religious tradition in contrast/comparison with her/his own.

 

 

Contact

Dr. Susan Daniel | (503) 838-8378 | daniels@wou.edu | BELL 318