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Course Catalog

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Music

MUS 111 Beginning Musicianship (3)
Introduction to the elements of musical composition, including chords, scales, rhythm and notation. No previous musical experience required. Recommended for students who wish to take MUE 318 or MUE 320.

 

MUS 181, 182, 183 Voice Class (2 each)
Essentials of singing, including tone production, diction, style and interpretation.

 

MUS 189, 190, 191 Piano Proficiency (2 each)
Elementary piano course including rhythm, notation, transposition, harmonization, performance of easy repertoire and sight reading. First three terms of a six-term sequence specially designed for the music major who is preparing for the piano proficiency examination. Prerequisite: Must be declared music major or minor

 

MUS 199 Special Studies (1-15)
Terms and hours to be arranged.

 

MUS 201 Introduction to Music and Its Literature (3)
An introduction to music literature through the study of elements and organizing principles as they relate to music of all periods. Stress is placed on listening to music that is popular in the concert hall.

 

MUS 202 Music of Broadway (3)
An introduction to the elements and organizing principles of music as they relate to the music of Broadway. Stress is placed on developing fundamental listening skills with this music. An historical overview of Broadway music is included.

 

MUS 203 Jazz History (3)
An historical and analytical view of America’s first indigenous musical art form. Focus on major figures and stylistic periods from Dixieland to post-fusion.

 

MUS 204 Music of the World (3)
Investigation of music in culture. A comparative view, with emphasis on music of Africa, Indonesia, South America, India and Japan.

 

MUS 205 Music of the Black Heritage (3)
Survey of roots, influences and development of the music of Black composers and performers in America from pre-Civil War to the present.

 

MUS 206 Introduction to Music and MIDI (3)
A historical survey of electroacoustic music and the evolution of music technology, including an introduction to MIDI-based instruments, computer-music application, sound design and basic electroacoustic composition techniques.

 

MUS 207 Song Writing (3)
Students will study examples of successful popular songs and fundamentals of music theory and notation. Using music writing and playback software, students will compose and record original songs.

 

MUS 208 Popular Music in America (3)
Survey of popular music in America from 1840 to the present. Satisfies LACC in music.

 

MUS 209 Rock Music: A Social History (3)
A three decade overview of rock music history (1950-1980) and how the music both reflected and influenced societal attitudes and behaviors regarding: sexuality, human rights movements, utopian and counter-culture perspectives, and the influence of mass media in these areas.

 

MUS 210 Music Today (3)
An investigation of the music of our time. This class focuses on music from recent recordings and films, on the web, and in live performance, using those examples as points of departure to explore the influences and traditions they embody. Genres and traditions to be considered include American pop, jazz, classical, country, bluegrass, and music from South America and other regions of the world.

 

MUS 211, 212, 213 Music Theory I, II, III (3 each)
The study of elements and principles of musical structure: Functional Tonality from the perspective of mid-20th Century American popular song; 16th-Century counterpoint; and set theory. Includes concept development, analysis and composition. Students must achieve a grade of “C” or higher in MUS 212 to proceed to the next term of the sequence, and all subsequent terms of the Musicianship core.

 

MUS 211L, 212L, 213L Aural Skills I, II, III (2 each)
Study of sight singing, ear training and temporal acuity products. Corequisite: must be taken concurrently with MUS 211, 212, 213

 

MUS 218 Contemporary Composition Techniques I (3)
Introduction to contemporary strategies, systems, methods, and techniques of composing music for various genre and mediums. Compositions will be performed and critiqued. Prerequisite: MUS 211

 

MUS 250 Concert Attendance (0)
Concert attendance for music majors. Available P/NC only.

 

MUS 289, 290, 291 Piano Proficiency (2 each)
The study of solo repertoire and technical studies. Second three terms of a six-term sequence specially designed for the music major who is preparing for the piano proficiency examination. Prerequisite: MUS 191 or consent of instructor

 

MUS 310 Women in Music (3)
Women’s contributions to music from 1800 to the present will be presented from a variety of perspectives. Performers, composers, conductors and arts supporters will be central to the material.

 

MUS 311, 312, 313 Music Theory IV, V, VI (3 each)
The study of music through performance, listening, analysis and composing. Ear training and keyboard work included. Topical emphases: counterpoint, harmony, arranging and form. Prerequisite: MUS 213

 

MUS 311L, 312L, 313L Aural Skills IV, V, VI (1 each)
Development of ear training, singing and keyboard skills relating to musicianship studies. Taken concurrently with MUS 311,312,313.

 

MUS 314 Orchestration I (3)
Traditional and contemporary orchestration and Instrumentation techniques for brass and woodwind instruments with emphasis on range, transposition, idiomatic solo writing, idiomatic ensemble writing, and standard practices for various ensembles and genres. Student projects will be performed and critiqued. Prerequisite: MUS 213 or consent of instructor

 

MUS 315 Orchestration II (3)
Traditional and contemporary orchestration and instrumentation techniques for string and percussion instruments with emphasis on range, transposition, idiomatic solo writing, idiomatic ensemble writing and standard practices for various ensembles and genres. Student projects will be performed and critiqued. Prerequisite: MUS 213 or consent of instructor

 

MUS 320 Basic Conducting (3)
Techniques of conducting, vocal and instrumental, including analysis of composition conducted. The class serves as a laboratory for singing and playing compositions conducted. Prerequisite: MUS 213, or consent of instructor

 

MUS 321 Instrumental Conducting (3)
Continued study of techniques in conducting instrumental music including analysis of compositions conducted, work with transpositions and full scores. Opportunity to conduct instrumental ensemble. Prerequisite: MUS 320

 

MUS 322 Choral Conducting (3)
Problems and techniques in choral conducting, together with harmonic and structural analysis of musical scores. Students will be involved with the preparation of repertoire and proper interpretation of music of all periods, with special emphasis on problems and solutions in contemporary music. Prerequisite: MUS 320

 

MUS 330 Rhythmic Awareness (3)
An exploration of the musical components of rhythm in relation to dance. Elements such as beat, meter and form are studied and developed in the context of movement and choreography. Also explored is the potential for collaboration between dancers and musicians, and basic elements of rhythmic notation. Prerequisite: MUS 213, Beginning Dance sequence, or consent of instructor

 

MUS 331 Improvisation I (2)
The study of major and minor keys and chord-scale relationships, and analysis and performance of jazz standards with a strong tonal center. Emphasis on melodic fluency. Prerequisite: MUS 211

 

MUS 332 Improvisation II (2)
The advanced study of functional tonality from a jazz perspective, including tonal gravity, secondary dominants, substitute chords and scales, multi-level analysis, and performance of jazz standards with multiple tonal centers. Emphasis on repertoire from Tin-Pan Alley and the Bebop era. Prerequisite: MUS 331

 

MUS 333 Improvisation III (2)
The study and practice of varied improvisatory idioms and materials, including free and structured improvisation and nonfunctional tonality. Emphasis on performance of original compositions in a small-group setting.

 

MUS 341 Pedagogy Studies—Piano (2)
Study and evaluation of various methods of piano pedagogy for beginners through advanced students. Practical application of the methods is required.

 

MUS 342 Vocal Pedagogy (3)
Introduction of methods and materials for teaching singing in a studio or small class. Attention is given to all elements of vocal production: respiration, phonation, resonance and articulation. Practical application of the methods is required. Prerequisite: three terms of voice

 

MUS 345 The Business of Music (3)
Topics concerning legal aspects of professional musicians in the marketplace, including performance rights, copyright laws, royalties, contracts, and affiliations with publishers, agents and arts organizations.

 

MUS 351 Accompanying (2)
Study of skills required for successful accompanying of instrumentalists and vocalists. Practical application of the techniques required.

 

MUS 360 Music from the Ancient World through the Renaissance (3)
A historical survey of the music of the Western World, beginning with Ancient Greece and concluding in the late 16th century.

 

MUS 361 17th and 18th Century Music (3)
A historical survey of Western European art music from the early modern period through the enlightenment, covering composers from Monteverdi through Mozart.

 

MUS 362 19th and 20th Century Music (3)
A historical survey of Western European and American art music of the last two centuries, covering composers from Beethoven through today’s active artists.

 

MUS 363 Ethnomusicology I (3)
Introduction to the discipline of ethnomusicology. Course focuses on the relationship of music and cultures. Will include specific study of selected world cultures. Prerequisite: MUS 213 or consent of instructor

 

MUS 364 Ethnomusicology II (3)
In depth study of music and lifeway of selected world cultures will be followed by field research in local musical subcultures. Prerequisite: MUS 363

 

MUS 365 Jazz Styles and Analysis (3)
An historical, analytical and theoretical view of America’s first indigenous musical art form, with a focus on major jazz figures and stylistic periods from Dixieland to post-fusion. This course is designed for music majors. Prerequisite: MUS 213 or consent of instructor

 

MUS 366 Music Since 1950 (3)
Historical investigation of the major compositional styles developed by late 20th century composers, as well as a consideration of cross influences among classical, popular and folk genres worldwide. Prerequisites: MUS 362, 364, and 365

 

MUS 399 Special Studies (1-3)

 

MUS 405 Senior Seminar and Project (3)
Overview of contemporary music worldwide and selected topics for focused study. Selection, development, and presentation of a senior project. Prerequisite: senior standing in music; may be repeated for credit

 

MUS 406 Special Individual Studies (1-15)
Terms and hours to be arranged. Designed for individual or special studies in a limited area of interest under the guidance of a designated faculty member.

 

MUS 407 Seminar (1-15)
Terms and hours to be arranged.

 

MUS 408 Workshops (1-15)
Terms and hours to be arranged.

 

MUS 409 Practicum (1-12)
Terms and hours to be arranged. Field experience in areas other than public school teaching. Maximum of 12 hours.

 

MUS 414/514 Jazz Theory (3)
An introduction to the elements of jazz theory and jazz composition, including harmony, scales, modes, rhythms, instrumentation, melodic fluency, voicings, orchestration, ear training, jazz nomenclature, and manuscript. Compositions and arrangements for jazz combos will be performed and critiqued. Prerequisite: MUS 213 or consent of instructor

 

MUS 415/515 Jazz Arranging I (3)
Arranging and composing for jazz combo and large ensemble with emphasis on the big band. Topics include: harmonizing melodic lines, voicings, orchestrating for the instrumental sections, and form. Compositions and arrangements for jazz combos and instrumental sections of the big band will be performed and critiqued. Prerequisite: MUS 414/514 or consent of instructor

 

MUS 416/516 Jazz Arranging II (3)
Advanced arranging and composition techniques for the big band with emphasis on counterpoint, 5-part voicing, extended forms, Latin jazz styles, and advanced orchestration and instrumentation. Compositions and arrangements for the big band will be performed and critiqued. Prerequisite: MUS 415/515

 

MUS 417 Counterpoint (3)
Study of and experience in writing in various imitative and non-imitative contrapuntal styles, with emphasis on 16th century counterpoint. Prerequisite: MUS 313

 

MUS 418/518 Contemporary Composition Techniques II (3)
Contemporary strategies, systems, methods, and techniques of composing music for various styles, genres and mediums. Compositions will be performed and critiqued. Prerequisite: MUS 218 and MUS 313

 

MUS 419 Music and Technology (4)
An introduction to computers and music technology, emphasizing algorithmic programming, sequencing, digital sound design, and multimedia authoring tools. Includes weekly studio times. Prerequisites: MTH 111, CS 160 and MUS 213

 

MUS 420/520 Electronic Music I (3)
Teaches basic means of creating and manipulating electronic music, including basic synthesizer operations, sequencing, MIDI, and basic audio equipment techniques. Prerequisite: MUS 206

 

MUS 421/521 Electronic Music II (3)
Advanced means of manipulating a digital/audio workstation, including hard-disk recording, basic recording techniques, CD mastering, utilizing digital hardware and software equipment, and composition of original works. Prerequisite: MUS 420/520

 

MUS 422/522 Electronic Music III (3)
Introduces students to theory and practices of digital synthesis and digital signal processing for applications in computer music, digital audio production, and multimedia. Using GUI software and object oriented programming languages, students learn basic programming techniques as they apply to new computer based technologies of music and audio production. Students participate in classroom activities and complete assigned work during lab time in the WOU Digital Audio Production Studio and MIDI lab. Prerequisite: MUS 421

 

MUS 423/523 Scoring for Film and Television (3)
Composing music for film and television with emphasis on the industry, synchronization and timings, spotting, dramatic conceptualization, orchestration, recording techniques, styles and genres. Underscoring projects will be performed, recorded and critiqued. Includes weekly studio times for scoring productions, composition and sound track transcriptions. Prerequisite: MUS 422/522

 

MUS 424/524 Vocal Literature (3)
Study of traditional “classical” vocal literature from Renaissance lute song through the 20th century viewed in terms of: melody, harmony, rhythm, accompaniment form and poetry, with consideration of style and performance practice.

 

MUS 425/525 Keyboard Literature (3)
An overview of keyboard literature from Baroque, Classical, Romantic and 20th Century periods. Activities include listening, study of style, performance practices and score identification.

 

MUS 428/528 Choral Literature (3)
Study of choral music’s place, style, and performance practice in each of the major Western European historical style periods. Includes examination of the choral genre in various world musics. Activities include listening, as well as studying representative scores.

 

MUS 429/529 Literature for Instrumental Ensembles (3)
Research, inventory, and selection of effective repertoire for the successful instrumental ensemble performer. Course concentrates on published music from the late 18th century to the present for modern orchestral and chamber ensembles.

 

MUS 430/530 Advanced Improvisation (3)
Transcription, analysis and performance of Instrumental and/or vocal Improvisation In contemporary, historical and ethnographic musical styles. Prerequisite: Ability to improvise convincingly in a complex tonal harmonic context

 

MUS 455 Lyric Diction (3)
Essentials of diction for singers in English, Italian, German and French using I.P.A. symbols.

 

MUS 460/560 Special Topics in Music History (3)
A cultural study on a historical, artistic, literary, or philosophical movement using the role of music in that movement as a catalyst or point of departure with which to explore it. The central topic will change with each offering in order to address the diverse interests and needs of the student body.

 

MUS 465/565 Special Topics In Music Theory (3)
Consideration of contemporary, historical, and ethnographic musical practices. Each term will focus on one or more topics such as species counterpoint, orchestration, serial music, minimalism, non-Western structures or cross-cultural influences.

 

MUS 606 Special Individual Studies (1-3)
This course is designed for graduate advanced individual study under the guidance of a designated faculty member.

 

MUS 607 Seminar (1-15)
Terms and hours to be arranged.

 

MUS 608 Workshop (1-15)
Terms and hours to be arranged.

 

MUS 640 College Pedagogy in Music (1-6)
Curricular development, learning assessment, philosophical perspectives and practical issues studied through observation of and collaboration with WOU faculty in the delivery of undergraduate coursework. Course may be repeated for credit when taken in conjunction with different undergraduate courses. Prerequisite: consent of instructor

 

MUS 675 Introduction to Graduate Research (3)
Introduces students to formal and informal scholarly communication and research in music. Finding resources, reading and interpreting research, and understanding and applying the principles of objective investigation will be the focus.

 

MUS 680 Special Topics in Contemporary Musicology (3)
A musicology seminar designed to provide graduate students with an intense one-term examination of a musical style, period, or philosophy from the last 125 years. The topic will change with each offering in order to address the diverse interests and needs of the student body.

 

MUS 685 Contemporary Readings in Music (3)
An investigation of contemporary writings in areas such as music criticism, comparative musicology, musical semiology and cognitive science.

 

MUS 690 Recording and Media Production (1)
Designed to orient musicians towards technical and business concerns involved in professional recording. Course objectives include understanding the roles of recording engineers and producers so as to be able to communicate effectively, understanding basic technical processes involved in the recording process so as to be able to translate aesthetic intent to correct technical language, and understanding what one should expect in the recording process in order to exert greater aesthetic control. Degree candidates must take three consecutive terms of MUS 690. A maximum of three credits can be applied to the degree.

 

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