Skip to main content
Switch to text-only version
Get accessibility information and assistance


Course Catalog

Back to the index of course descriptions

 

 

American Sign Language/English Interpreting

INT 253 Comparative Linguistics: ASL/English (3)
Designed to compare the grammatical structures of American Sign Language and English. Students will use a comparative/contrastive approach to the study of ASL and English and will focus on grammatically-acceptable ASL productions. Students are introduced to the linguistic and culturally-based communication issues that impact the interpreting process.

 

INT 254 Introduction to the Profession of Interpreting (3)
An introductory overview to the profession of interpreting. Course content includes the history of interpreting, terminology, the responsibilities, skills, aptitudes of interpreters, the process of becoming an interpreter, employment environment and options, and current issues.

 

INT 330 Theory and Process of Interpreting I (3)
Introduces the sociolinguistic factors that influence communication, strategies for analyzing discourse and the theory and process of bilingual/bicultural interpreting. Course content includes the ways in which speakers construct messages, current theories in the process of interpreting, language acquisition/language learning theory and their impact on the interpreting process. Content also includes interpreting task analysis, pre-interpreting skills and process management skills that promote the effective analysis of interpreted messages. Prerequisite: admission to Interpreting program

 

INT 330L Theory and Process of Interpreting I Lab (1)
This interpreting lab, to be taken concurrently with INT 330, offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and to practice the techniques introduced in INT 330. In this lab, students will practice interpreting task analysis, pre-interpreting skills and process management skills.

 

INT 340 Ethics and Decision Making for Interpreters (3)
Includes a study of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Code of Professional Conduct, ethics-related terminology, values systems and change, the ways in which situational, institutional and legal constraints affect professional decision making, and becoming an ethical professional. Course content includes information on group theory and skills, decision making, problem solving, conflict resolution, stress management and communication skills.

 

INT 341 Theory and Process of Interpreting II (3)
Introduces students to the analysis and production aspects of ASL-to-English and English-to-ASL interpretation. Students analyze texts using a Goal-to-Detail information management system and practice a variety of visualization techniques. Students participate in group translations of ASL and English texts and consecutively interpret analyzed monologues and dialogues.

 

INT 341L Theory and Process of Interpreting II Lab (1)
This interpreting lab, to be taken concurrently with INT 341, offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and to practice the techniques introduced in the Interpreting II class. In this lab, students analyze texts, develop individual and group translations and practice consecutive interpretation.

 

INT 342 Theory and Process of Interpreting III (3)
Concentrates on the production aspects of ASL-to-English and English-to-ASL interpretation. Students conduct linguistic and functional analyses of texts focusing on register, style, and effect of presenters. Students consecutively interpret from both pre-analyzed and unfamiliar monologues and dialogues whose content is taken from community interpreting settings. Students work with taped messages and with guest speakers.

 

INT 342L Theory and Process of Interpreting III Lab (1)
This interpreting lab, to be taken concurrently with INT 342, offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and to practice the techniques introduced in the Interpreting III class. In this lab, students analyze texts for register, style and affect; practice consecutive interpretations of pre-analyzed monologues and dialogues, and practice consecutive interpretations of unfamiliar material.

 

INT 365 Interpreting in Community Settings (3)
Introduces students to a variety of settings in which interpreters work and the vocabulary and discourse patterns used by consumers in these settings. Through contact with interpreters and consumers, students become familiar with the specific vocabulary, professional issues, ethical considerations, knowledge bases and skills related to each community setting. Students will be introduced to several interpreting settings, including social service, government, legal, medical, mental health, business, religious, performing arts and sports activities.

 

INT 406 Individual Studies in Interpreting (1-3)
Terms and hours to be arranged. Designed for individual or special studies in a limited area of interest under the guidance of a designated faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor

 

INT 407 Seminar: Interpreting (1-12)
Terms and hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: consent of instructor

 

INT 408 Workshop (1-12)
Terms and hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: consent of instructor

 

INT 409 Practicum: Interpreting (1-12)
Terms and hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: consent of instructor

 

INT 410 Internship (3-12)
Offers students the opportunity to work with a professional interpreter who serves as a mentor. Students observe professional interpreters, provide interpreting services while under supervision and perform independent interpreting assignments. Students apply the t heory, knowledge and skills obtained in the classroom to the delivery of interpreting services, acquire new professional knowledge and s kills, and develop effective professional work habits and positive working relationships with co-workers and consumers.

 

INT 420/520 Deaf History: Social and Cultural Issues (3)
Introduces students to a history of the social, cultural, political, educational and social service aspects of the Deaf community. Students examine the norms and values of Deaf culture, the linguistic, educational, social and professional influences on the Deaf community, and the ways in which deaf and hearing people interact in American society.

 

INT 441 Theory and Process of Interpreting IV (3)
Concentrates on the production aspects of spontaneous ASL-to-English and English-to-ASL interpreting. Students incorporate linguistic and functional text analyses into their consecutive interpreting performances. Students work with recorded messages and with guest speakers in interpreting situations that include monologues, dialogues, interviews and group discussions. Emphasis is on accurate and fluent interpretations, and students are introduced to team interpreting techniques.

 

INT 441L Theory and Process of Interpreting IV Lab (1)
This interpreting lab, to be taken concurrently with INT 441, offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and to practice the techniques introduced in the Interpreting IV class. In this lab, students practice consecutive interpretations of spontaneous monologues, dialogues, interviews and group discussions. Students also practice team interpreting techniques.

 

INT 442 Theory and Process of Interpreting V (3)
This course concentrates on the successful interpretation of texts within a simultaneous interpreting framework. Students incorporate linguistic and functional text analyses into simultaneous interpretations, work with both recorded material and guest presenters. Students are expected to produce accurate and fluent simultaneous interpretations of increasingly difficult monologues, dialogues, interviews, and group discussions.

 

INT 442L Theory and Process of Interpreting V Lab (1)
This interpreting lab, to be taken concurrently with INT 442, offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and to practice the techniques introduced in the Interpreting V class. In this lab, students practice simultaneous interpretations of increasingly difficult monologues, dialogues, interviews and group discussions.

 

INT 465 Current Issues for Interpreters (3)
Investigates current issues facing the professional interpreter. For example, students discuss issues of bilingualism/biculturalism, legal statutes and liability, certification and quality assurance, confidentiality, accountability, minority status of American Sign Language and Deaf Culture, oppression and empowerment of the Deaf Community, the interpreter as a cross-cultural mediator and other contemporary issues.

 

INT 466 Interpreting in Postsecondary Settings (3)
Introduces students to working in postsecondary settings in which interpreters work and the vocabulary and discourse patterns used by consumers in these settings. Students will become familiar with the specific vocabulary, professional issues, ethical considerations, knowledge base and skills related to the postsecondary setting. Students will be introduced to several interpreting settings.

 

INT 467 Interpreting in Educational Settings (3)
Designed to apply advanced interpreting, and classroom support skills to educational settings. Strategies for interpreting frozen texts, negotiating situational-based signs and interpreting for presenters from various content areas who have a variety of instructional styles. Students are introduced to the effect of hearing loss on language and educational development and to the laws that affect the education of Deaf/Hard of Hearing students. Students practice tutoring, note taking and inservice techniques, and discuss the ways that interpreters collaborate with other professionals to work with Deaf and Hard of Hearing students.

 

INT 468 Specialized Interpreting Techniques (2)
Students are introduced to specialized communication and interpreting techniques that are used with a variety of consumers and in specific situations. Students are introduced to oral, deaf-blind and manually-coded English interpreting techniques. This course includes work with television/videotape cameras, telephones, microphones and assistive listening devices.

 

INT 492 Language and Communication Systems: Deaf and Hard of Hearing (3)
Students will develop knowledge of the linguistic principles of American Sign Language and English, the different modes of communication used by Deaf and Hard of Hearing persons, the various language and communication policies and signed systems used in the classroom. Students will assess language and communication functioning and the language continuum. They will apply research findings to interpretation and practice interpreting classroom discourse.

 

Back to the index of course descriptions 

Contact

Office of the Registrar ph: 503-838-8327; fax: 503-838-9696 | or e-mail: registrar@wou.edu

MissionWestern Oregon University | 345 N. Monmouth Ave. | Monmouth OR 97361 | 503-838-8000(V/TTY) | Admissions 1-877-877-1593 | webmaster@wou.edu Text only
sandman-127 Remote IP: 54.227.5.234 ((none!))