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Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

Biology Course Offerings

BI 101, 102, 103 General Biology (5 each)
The major principles and methods of biol­ogy: BI 101 includes ecology, the diversity of life and an introduction to evolution. BI 102 considers cellular structure and function, energy transformations, genetics, evolu­tion, reproduction and development. BI 103 emphasizes the anatomy and physiology of plants and animals along with a brief treatment of animal behavior. This sequence is designed for students not intending to pursue further study in the biological sciences. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Offered during the academic year.


BI 101X, 102X, 103X General Biology Peer Led Team Learning (0)
Peer-led Team Learning (PLTL) is a sepa­rate, 0-credit course that uses a learning model designed for participating students registered in introductory biology series to develop a broader and deeper understand­ing of course concepts.


BI 211, 212, 213 Principles of Biology (5 each)
An introduction to the science of biology, including morphological, physiological and developmental aspects of living organisms; the phylogeny, evolution and ecology of both plants and animals, and fundamental concepts of genetics and molecular biology. Designed for the biology major. Four hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory period. Prerequisite: Passing grade in BI 211 required for admission to BI 212 and BI 213. Students interested in BI 211 are strongly en­couraged to have taken high school biology and chemistry or BI 102 and CH 104. BI 211 offered fall and winter term. BI 212 offered winter term. BI 213 offered spring term


BI 234 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)
Study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Uses lecture and laboratories utilizing human cadavers to cover the follow­ing topics: integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and immune system. Three one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BI 102 or BI 211 with a grade of C- or better; offered fall and winter terms


BI 235 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)
Study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Uses lecture and laboratories utilizing human cadavers to cover the follow­ing topics: nervous system, special senses, endocrine system and cardiovascular system. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BI 234; offered winter and spring terms103


BI 236 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)
Study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Uses lecture and laboratories utilizing human cadavers to cover the fol­lowing topics: respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system and reproductive system. Three one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BI 235; offered fall and spring terms


BI 314 Introductory Genetics (4)
Principles and mechanisms of inheritance, including consideration of patterns of inheri­tance, the nature of the gene, chromosome structure, gene action, population genetics and mechanisms of mutation. Three hours lecture plus one hour discussion section per week. Prerequisite: BI 211 or consent of instructor, and MTH 111 or equivalent; offered fall term.


BI 315 Cell Biology (4)
An introduction to cell structure and function required for the biology major. Examines the architecture and basic organelle activity in the intact cell and the major techniques cur­rently employed to study cells. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab each week. Prerequisites: BI 213, BI 314, and CH 221; offered winter term


BI 316 Evolution (4)
Introduction to the major concepts and principles of evolutionary biology with an emphasis on the sources of variation, mech­anisms of evolution, phylogenetics and the evolution of the human lineage. Three hours lecture plus one hour discussion session. Prerequisite: BI 212 and BI 314 or consent of instructor; offered spring term.


BI 317 Vertebrate Natural History (4)
The classification, behavior, life history and ecology of vertebrate animals, focusing primarily on amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. Laboratory will emphasize identi­fication and field studies of vertebrates that occur in Oregon. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Prerequi­sites: Introductory biology sequence; offered spring term of odd-numbered years


BI 318 Microbiology for the Health Sciences (4)
An introduction to the biology of microorgan­isms with an emphasis on infectious human disease agents, immunology and the control of disease through antimicrobial strategies and vaccination. Designed for students inter­ested in pre-nursing, pre-dental hygiene and entry level positions in public health laborato­ries. Laboratory component emphasizes skills with microscopes, identification testing and includes practical exams. Not open for credit to biology majors or minors. However, credit may be applied to the Human Biology minor. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour lab per week. Prerequisites: BI 102 or BI 211 with a grade of C- or better; offered winter and spring terms.


BI 321 Systematic Field Botany (4)
Designed to give practical experience in the identification of common plant families and species of the Willamette Valley. Includes the learning of major characteristics of plant families from a phylogenetic perspective and the use of tools for plant identification. Field collections that emphasize careful observa­tion and records of ecological relations as plants are collected and field trips to se­lected sites are required. Three lectures plus one three-hour laboratory period. BI 101 or BI 213 recommended; offered spring term


BI 324 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (5)
A comparative analysis of vertebrate mor­phology, emphasizing the study of organs and organ systems, and an introduction to the taxonomy, evolution and functional morphology of the vertebrates. Included in this course will be an examination of human anatomy utilizing cadavers. Three one-hour lectures and two two-hour laboratories. Prerequisite: BI 212 or consent of instructor; offered fall term of even-numbered years


BI 326 Developmental Biology (4)
Development of model vertebrates and invertebrates from fertilization through or­ganogenesis; includes analyses of early cell cleavage, morphogenesis, differentiation and growth. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequi­sites: BI 315 and one year of chemistry, or consent of instructor; offered winter term of even-numbered years


BI 330 Plant Physiology (5)
An examination of the physiological pro­cesses and mechanisms involved in plant nutrition, photosynthesis, assimilation of organic and inorganic materials, energy balance, water requirements, growth factors and organismic control. Three hours lecture and one four-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite; BI 213 and CH 223 or consent of instructor; offered winter term of even-numbered years


BI 331 General Microbiology (4)
Selected topics in the science of microbiol­ogy with an emphasis on microbial structures and physiology as they impact diversity and ecology, biotechnology, and diseases (bacterial, viral, and protozoal). Involved lab component represents nearly half course grade. Prerequisites: BI 211, 212, 213, 314, CH 221, 222, 223, WR 135; offered winter and spring terms


BI 334 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)
Selected topics in the area of human anat­omy and physiology with an emphasis on the physiological processes that govern the human body and the anatomical landscape that allows for these processes to occur. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BI 212; offered fall term of odd-numbered years


BI 335 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)
Selected topics in the area of human anat­omy and physiology with an emphasis on the physiological processes that govern the human body and the anatomical landscape that allows for these processes to occur. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BI 334; offered winter term of even-numbered years


BI 336 Human Histology and Physiology (4)
The study of microscopic anatomy of the human body integrated with the function of cells, tissues and organs. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratories. Prerequisites: BI 102, 103 or BI 211, BI 212 or consent of the instructor; offered spring term


BI 357 General Ecology (4)
Focuses on the patterns of distribution and abundance of organisms in space and through time. Explores the underlying causes, both natural and anthropogenic, of these patterns at the population, community and ecosystem levels for a variety of organisms and ecosystems. In the lab, students will engage in nearly all phases of ecological research. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BI 211, 212, 213, MTH 111, WR 135; offered fall term


BI 360 Animal Behavior (4)
A consideration of the basic problems in animal behavior, including ecological adap­tations of behavioral patterns, mechanisms underlying behavior, social behavior, and the nature and organization of animal societies. Three lectures and one three-hour labora­tory. Prerequisites: Introductory biology sequence (100 or 200 series) or consent of instructor; offered winter term of odd-num­bered years


BI 361 Marine Ecology (5)
Explores the ecology and diversity of marine ecosystems worldwide, and focuses on adaptations, life histories and interactions of organisms with each other and their environ­ment. Regions covered include temperate, tropical and polar seas, the open ocean and the deep sea. Laboratory time is divided between field trips to the Oregon coast and observation of living marine organisms. Three one-hour lectures and one four-hour labora­tory period. Prerequisites: BI 212 and 213 or consent of instructor; offered spring term


BI 370 Environmental Science (4)
The study of how humans interact with their environment and the effect of the environ­ment on human society. Topics include basic ecological principals, human population growth, environmental health, air and water pollution, ecosystem change and global impacts. Does not substitute for BI 357 in the biology major program. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory including field work. Prerequisite: BI 101 or equivalent; offered fall term


BI 371 Structure of Seed Plants (4)
The morphology, anatomy and reproduc­tion of seed plants from an evolutionary perspective. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods. Prerequisite: BI 213 or consent of instructor – offered fall term of odd-numbered years


BI 406 Individual Study (1-15)
Terms and hours to be arranged. Eligible for the RP grade option.


BI 407/507 Seminar (1-15)
Terms and hours to be arranged. Eligible for the RP grade option.


BI 408 Workshop (1-9)
Eligible for the RP grade option.


BI 409 Practicum (1-9)
Eligible for the RP grade option.


BI 424 Human Dissection (3)
A study of gross anatomy of the human body through the dissection of a cadaver. Prerequi­sites: Upper-division standing and permission of instructor – offered spring term


BI 432 Immunology (4)
A course on immune mechanisms, includ­ing the nature of antigens, antibodies and their interactions, the anatomy, cell biology, genetics, regulation, diseases of mammalian immune system and the use of antibodies as tools in the clinical and research laboratory. Two lectures and two three-hour laborato­ries. Prerequisites: BI 315 and one year of chemistry, or consent of instructor – offered winter term of odd-numbered years


BI 434 Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (4)
A comparative analysis of vertebrate physiol­ogy, emphasizing how different kinds of ver­tebrates work and why they have evolved to work the way they do. Included in this course will be an examination of various aspects of human physiology. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BI 212 or consent of instructor – offered winter term of odd-numbered years


BI 441/541 Human Heredity (3-4)
Basic principles of inheritance, including Mendelian patterns of inheritance, mo­lecular genetics, chromosomal aberrations, sex determination, gene mapping, genetic engineering and population genetics as it relates to humans. The lab illustrates topics included in the lecture. Offered spring term.


BI 451 Invertebrate Zoology (5)
A systematic study of invertebrates, with a comparative approach to anatomy, physiol­ogy, behavior, life history and evolution. Emphasizes the relatedness of structure and function and focuses on the adapta­tions of these animals to their environments. Observation of living marine invertebrates is emphasized in the lab. Three one-hour lectures and one four-hour laboratory period. Prerequisite: BI 212 or consent of instructor – offered spring term of even-numbered years


BI 453/553 Marine Vertebrates (4)
Investigates the anatomy, physiology, be­havior, and ecology of marine vertebrates, focusing on challenges unique to the marine environment. Students will compare marine fish, reptiles, birds and mammals in explo­ration of different topics. Current issues such as over fishing and effects of marine pollutants will also be included. Four lecture hours. Prerequisite: Introductory biology sequence (100 or 200 series) or consent of instructor – offered winter term of even-numbered years


BI 454/554 Plant Ecology (4)
Focuses on the patterns of distribution and abundance of organisms in space and through time. Explores the underlying causes, both natural and anthropogenic, of these patterns at the population, community and ecosystem levels for a variety of plants and ecosystems. In the lab, students will engage in nearly all phases of ecological re­search. Emphasis will be placed on learning to effectively communicate ecological con­cepts in writing to a non-scientific audience. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: BI 211, 212, 213, MTH 111, WR 135; offered spring term of even-numbered years


BI 458/558 Field Biology (3-4)
Systematics, life histories and field methods in selected areas of biology. Lecture, labora­tory and field trips to be scheduled. Eligible for the RP grade option. Prerequisite: Introductory sequence in biology or consent of instructor – offered summer


BI 461/561 Conservation Biology (4)
Introduction to the principles and practices of conservation biology. Topics include biodiversity, extinctions, habitat fragmenta­tion, restoration ecology, impacts of invasive species, and sustainability, among oth­ers. Particular emphasis will be placed on subjects pertinent to Oregon and temperate regions. Two 80-minute lectures plus three field trips. Prerequisite: Introductory biology sequence or consent of instructor – offered fall term of even-numbered years


BI 474 Biology of Insects (5)
Focuses on the anatomy, physiology, behav­ior and life history strategies of insects. Also examines the evolutionary relationships and diversity of this most varied group of ani­mals. A significant portion of the lab period is spent in the field. Three one-hour lectures and one four-hour laboratory period. Pre­requisites: BI 212 or consent of instructor – offered spring term of odd-numbered years


BI 475 Molecular Biology (4)
Structure and function of the gene. Study of genome structure and selected cases of the regulation of transcription and translation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Includes the complexity, stability and alterations of the genome in order to understand molecular evolution and the action of viruses. Two lec­tures and one four-hour lab. Prerequisites: BI 314, BI 315 and one year of chemistry or consent of instructor – offered spring term of odd numbered years


BI 606 Special Individual Studies (1-9)
Terms and hours to be arranged. Eligible for the RP grade option.


BI 608 Workshop (1-9)
Terms and hours to be arranged. Eligible for the RP grade option.


BI 609 Practicum (1-9)
Terms and hours to be arranged. Eligible for the RP grade option.


BI 624 Human Dissection (2-5)
Advanced study of the gross anatomy of the human body through the dissection of a cadaver. The exact number of credits will be determined by the background of the student and goals agreed upon by the stu­dent and instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor – of­fered spring term

 
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