GIS Geology3

EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE MINOR

Earth Science students learn about geoscience with an emphasis on the scientific method, problem solving, and interdisciplinary science education. Our graduates are prepared for careers in geoscience, education, environmental management and natural hazards mitigation.  They are also ready to make wise decisions on important issues related natural resources, environmental quality and sustainability in Oregon and beyond.

WOU Earth Science Students:
  • Learn about the physical, chemical, and biological processes operating in the Earth System.
  • Apply technology-based methods to solve geologic problems and communicate results.
  • Conduct scientific investigations in laboratory and field settings.
Faculty: 

Professors: Jeffrey Myers, Stephen Taylor, Jeffrey Templeton

Assistant Professor: Melinda Shimizu

Earth System Science minor…………………………… 25-28

Minor Requirements   10 credits

ES 104 Earth System Science (5)

ES 105 Earth System Science (5) -or- ES 106 Earth System Science (5)

Choose two: (6)

ES 331 Introduction to Oceanography (3)

ES 390 Basic Meteorology (3)

GS 351 Elements of Astronomy (3)

Choose one: (3-4)

ES 341 Geographic Information Systems I (4)

ES 473 Environmental Geology (4)

ES 476 Hydrology (3)

ES 492 Advanced GIS Applications in Earth Science (4)

Choose one: (3-4)

ES 354 Volcanoes and Earthquakes (4)

ES 454 Volcanology (4)

ES 460 Energy and Mineral Resources (3)

Choose one: (3-4)

ES 304 Survey of the Fossil Record (3)

ES 431 Paleobiology (4)

ES 453 Geology of the Pacific Northwest (4)

ES 491 Stratigraphy and Depositional Systems (3)

 

Earth Science Student Handbook  –  Earth_Science_Advising_Guide_July_2015

 

Earth System Science Courses

ES 104,105,106 Earth System Science (5)

This three-term sequence of courses integrates the critical concepts of chemistry, physics, and geology in the context of the Earth as a system. ES 104: Focus on the Solar System, the processes driven by the interior of Earth, including plate tectonics, earthquakes, and volcanism, and introduction to study of Earth materials. ES 105: Focus on physical and chemical processes occurring at the surface of Earth with an emphasis on energy in the Earth system. ES 106: Focus on human impacts to the Earth system, including chemical and physical aspects of water pollution, oceanography, air pollution, meteorology, and global climate change. Not open to students who have taken more advanced course in the corresponding subject matter. All three courses require three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

ES 304 Survey of the Fossil Record (3)

Explores the 4 billion year fossil record of life on earth. Begins with a survey of the diversity of fossil forms and the criteria used to distinguish fossils on the basis of hard part morphology. Then examines the evolution of increasingly complex forms of life from the pre-Phanerozoic through the recent, from simple prokaryotic cells to complex metazoans. The final week examines the use of fossils as proxies for the measurement of paleotemperature, precipitation, and other climatic variables. The course emphasizes concise and precise writing and critical thinking skills. Two hours of lecture and two hours of lab weekly.

ES 331 Introduction to Oceanography (3)

An introduction to physical oceanography with topics including seafloor tectonics, ocean basin physiography, sediment production and transport, physical properties of sea water, chemistry of sea water, air-sea interaction, ocean circulation, tides, waves, and coastal processes. Concepts of physics, chemistry, geology, and mathematics (through algebra) are incorporated to supplement topical discussions of ocean processes. Three hours of lecture and active learning per week.

ES 341 Geographic Information Systems I (4):

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems using the ArcGIS software platform. Topics include cartographic principles, coordinate systems, map projections, vector/raster data models, geodatabases, attribute data management, data exploration/queries, data display, map production, geoprocessing, attribute/feature editing, and metadata. Four hours of lecture and active learning per week. Prerequisite: ES 340, or consent of instructor.

ES 351 Geology for Educators (3)

Lab intensive course emphasizing fundamental principles of geology, including topics in rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, constructive and destructive earth surface processes, geological hazards, and hydrology, which form the Oregon Science Benchmark Standards in Earth Science. Two hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Cannot be used as an upperdivision
elective for students majoring in Earth Science.

ES 354 Volcanoes and Earthquakes (4)

Introduction to earthquake phenomena with an emphasis on the impact to people, infrastructure, and natural resources in Oregon and the western United States. Course will focus on using seismology to interpret interior of Earth, mechanisms that cause earthquakes, relation to plate tectronics, and associated hazards.  Four hour of lecture and active learning per week; supplemental field trips will be incorporated as needed.  Pre-req: Intro geology course, or consent of instructor.

ES 390 Basic Meteorology (3)

An introductory study of atmospheric processes and meteorologic phenomena. Topics include structure of the atmosphere, heat transfer, air pressure, precipitation, circulation, data collection, and weather forecasting. Three hours of lecture and active learning per week.

ES 431/531 Paleobiology (4)

The evolution of terrestrial and marine ecosystems interpreted from the fossil record; the application of paleontological data to resolving problems in earth history. Offered alternate years. Four hours of lecture and active learning. PREREQ: a beginning biology course or consent of instructor. RECOMMENDED: ES 203.

ES 453/553 Geology of the Pacific Northwest (4)

An introduction to the geology, geological history, tectonic evolution, geological resources, and landscape development of Western North America, with an emphasis on the geology of Oregon. Four hours of lecture and active learning. PREREQ: A general geology course or consent of instructor.

ES 454/554 Volcanology (3)

Study of the processes and products of volcanism. Focus is on rock types, structures, field relations, tectonic settings, conditions of origin, and geologic history of volcanism with specific emphasis on the Pacific Northwest. Three hours of lecture and active learning per week; supplemental field trips will be incorporated as needed. Offered in alternating years. PREREQ:Introductory geology course, or consent of instructor.

ES 460/560 Energy and Mineral Resources (3)

Focus on the geology of energy and mineral resources in terms of their description, occurrence, origin, and distribution. Also consider extraction, treatment, uses, and reserves of mineral and energy resources; the historical, economic, and social issues involved with certain resources; and the environmental implications of the use and exploitation of resources. Three hours of lecture and active learning per week. Offered in alternating years. PREREQ: Introductory geology course, or consent of instructor.

ES 473 Environmental Geology (4)

The study of contemporary environmental issues as related to geologic systems. Topics include geologic hazards, land use, groundwater-surface water-soil contamination, remediation technologies, environmental planning, habitat restoration, applied analytical techniques, and consulting practice. Four hours of lecture and active learning per week. Supplemental field trips will be incorporated as needed. PREREQ: ES 201, ES 202, or consent of instructor.

ES 476 Hydrology

Investigation of near-surface hydrologic systems of the Earth. Topics include the hydrologic cycle, water budgets, introductory fluid dynamics, groundwater systems, watershed analysis, water quality and water resource evaluation. Three hours of lecture and active learning per week. Supplemental field trips will be incorporated as needed. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: ES 201, ES 202, or consent of instructor.

ES 491 Stratigraphy and Despositional Systems (4)

This course is designed for both Earth Science majors and general interest audiences. The course offers an overview of clastic depositional environments and sequences, including continental, marine marginal, and deep marine settings. Concepts and applications of facies and stratigraphic modeling will be explored, with an emphasis on natural resource exploration and recovery. Examination of tectonic controls on the nature and distribution of facies and paleoenvironments of sedimentary basins in tectonically active settings. Offered in alternating years. Three hours of lecture and active learning. PREREQ: a general geology course or consent of instructor; RECOMMENDED: ES 392.

ES 492/592 Advanced GIS Applications in Earth Science (4):

Focus on the application of geographic information systems to real-world problems in the Earth sciences. Emphasis is placed on the use of computer technology in analyzing spatial and temporal relationships of geologic systems. Four hours of lecture and active learning per week. Prerequisite: ES 342, or consent of instructor.

 

 

 

 

 

Contact Us:

Department of Earth and Physical Science

Department Chair: Jeff Templeton  

503-838-8858   l    email: templej@wou.edu l   Location: Natural Science Building  NS 211